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  • Contains 22 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 02/02/2022 at 2:00 PM (EST)

    A monthly training series geared towards addressing vicarious trauma response across VTRI Community Implementation Site partners.

    A monthly training series geared towards addressing vicarious trauma response across VTRI Community Implementation Site partners.

    Target Audience: Community Implementation Sites

    Overall Objective: A training series hosted by the Vicarious Trauma Response Initiative for all partner organizations across the 12 Community Implementation Sites focusing on mitigating the negative effects of work-related trauma exposure and building partnerships and collaborations to address vicarious trauma response on an organizational level.

    Project Funding Provided By: The Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice

    Includes: Monthly webinars hosted by the Vicarious Trauma Response Initiative 

    Meg Garvin

    Executive Director & Clinical Professor of Law, MA, JD

    National Crime Victim Law Institute

    Meg Garvin is the Executive Director of the National Crime Victim Law Institute (NCVLI) and a Clinical Professor of Law at Lewis & Clark Law School. Ms. Garvin is recognized as a leading expert on victims’ rights. She has testified before Congress, state legislatures and the Judicial Proceedings Panel on Sexual Assault in the Military. In her expert capacity she has served on the Defense Advisory Committee on Investigation, Prosecution and Defense of Sexual Assault in the Armed Forces, the Victims Advisory Group of the United States Sentencing Commission, and the Victim Services Subcommittee, of the Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crime Panel of the United States Department of Defense, as co-chair of the American Bar Association’s Criminal Justice Section Victims Committee, co-chair of the Oregon Attorney General’s Crime Victims’ Rights Task Force and as a member of the Legislative & Public Policy Committee of the Oregon Attorney General’s Sexual Assault Task Force.  She has received numerous awards in recognition of her work, including in 2015 the John W. Gillis Leadership Award from National Parents of Murdered Children; in 2020, the American Bar Association Criminal Justice Section’s Frank Carrington Crime Victim Attorney Award, and in 2021, the Hardy Myers Victim Advocacy Award from the Oregon Crime Victims Law Center. Prior to joining NCVLI, Ms. Garvin practiced law in Minneapolis, Minnesota and clerked for the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Pronouns: she/her/hers. 

    Chris Newlin

    Executive Director, MS LPC

    National Children's Advocacy Center

    Chris Newlin is the executive director of the National Children’s Advocacy Center (NCAC) in Huntsville, AL, where he is responsible for providing leadership and management of the agency, as well as participating in national and international training and leadership activities regarding the protection of children.  The NCAC was the first Children’s Advocacy Center (CAC) in the world and provides child abuse prevention and intervention services in Huntsville/Madison County; and also houses the NCAC Training Center, the Southern Regional Children’s Advocacy Center, the NCAC Virtual Training Center, and the Child Abuse Library Online (CALiO).  The NCAC is a past multi-year winner of the Better Business Bureau’s Torch Award for Workplace Ethics; 2012 Huntsville/Madison County Chamber of Commerce Non-Profit of the Year; 2016 Federal Bureau of Investigation Director’s Community Leadership Award recipient; (multi-year finalist), winner in 2017 and 2019 of the Huntsville/Madison County Chamber of Commerce Best Places to Work; and a Private Sector Member of the Virtual Global Taskforce.  Chris has more than 24 years of experience working in CACs as a forensic interviewervictim advocateclinical director, and executive director. He has provided training in more than 30 countries at numerous international conferences and continues to provide technical assistance on a regular basis to professionals working to develop multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) and CACs throughout the world. Chris received his master’s degree in school psychology from the University of Central Arkansas, is a licensed professional counselor, and has completed coursework at the Harvard University Business School Executive Education Program.

    Paula Gomez Stordy

    Senior Director of National Training and Technical Assistance

    Esperanza United

    Paula Gomez Stordy has more than 25 years of experience working in the field of gender-based violence, of which 17 years were in non-profit management. She is the Senior Director of National Training and Technical Assistance for Esperanza United: National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities, a national resource center with a focus on providing training, research, and policy advocacy to prevent and end domestic violence and sexual assault. Ms. Gomez Stordy directs national training and technical assistance overseeing federal grants, programming, and supervision of staff to enhance culturally responsive approaches and capacity to both mainstream and culturally specific organizations across the country.

    Leo Martinez

    Project Manager

    Esperanza United

    Leo Martinez is a Project Manager with Esperanza United, formerly Casa de Esperanza - National Latin@ Network. With Esperanza United he currently works providing Language Access and Cultural Responsiveness training as part of the national resource center on domestic violence in the Latino community; he is a Training and Technical Assistance lead with the Vicarious Trauma Response Initiative, a national initiative funded by the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) and led by the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP); he informs the Intimate Partner Homicide project focused on Latino victims and funded by the Office on Violence against Women (OVW). He also collaborates on the Enhancing Access Peer to Peer project focused on language access, funded also by the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC). 

  • Contains 5 Component(s)

    Officer Family Wellness Podcast Series interviews experts on various health and wellness topics to inform law enforcement leaders and help families thrive.

    Officer Family Wellness Podcast Series features a variety of subject matter experts with insight for those looking to create or enhance family wellness both in policing agencies and at home. Episodes feature discussions on sleep hygiene, communication in families, financial wellness, suicide prevention, and family resilience. 

    Target Audience: Agency leadership, officers and policing families. 

    Overall Objective: Provide insight and tangible actions for law enforcement stakeholders looking to enhance officer family wellness. 

    Project Funding Provided By: Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) 

    Includes: Podcast episode topics include healthy sleep habits, communication, financial wellness, suicide prevention, and family resilience.

    Dr. Lois James

    Assistant Professor

    Washington State University College of Nursing

    Lois James, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Washington State University (WSU) College of Nursing, where she focuses on bias, stress, sleep, and performance in “high stress” populations such as police officers, military personnel, nurses, and top tier athletes. 

    Cyndi Doyle, LPC-S, NCC, CDWF, CCISM

    Licensed Professional Counselor Supervisor

    Code4Couples

    Cyndi Doyle is a Licensed Professional Counselor Supervisor in Texas, National Certified Counselor, and Certified Daring Way Facilitator for Dr. Brene Brown. She is the co-owner of Pecan Branch Counseling in Denton, Texas. Cyndi is certified in Critical Incident Stress Management and serves on local CISM teams as well as the Dallas/Fort Worth regional team. Cyndi's passions include serving the first responder community and other mental health professionals. In 2017, Cyndi's passion for first responders and their spouses inspired her to found Code4Couples, a company dedicated to support and increase resilience in first responders, their spouses, and their relationships. Through her Code4Couples podcast, Cyndi normalizes experiences of first responders and their spouses by sharing her own journey and stories as a Law Enforcement spouse, educates them on related mental health and relationship difficulties, empowers them with tools, techniques, and resources, and promotes connection within the First Responder community.  

    Daniel Scesney

    Chief

    Grand Prairie, Texas Police Department

    Chief Daniel Scesney (Grand Prairie, Texas Police Department) came to Texas in 1998 after serving his country in the United States Marine Corps as a Military Police Officer. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice Administration from Columbia College and a Master of Science in Criminal Justice and Criminology from Texas Christian University (TCU). His career with GPPD began in 2001 during which time he served in a variety of capacities including Patrol Officer, Directed Patrol Unit, SWAT Team Leader, Narcotics, Property Crimes, Domestic Crimes, Major Crimes (including adult and child homicide investigations), Patrol Supervisor, and has commanded both the Special Operations and Investigative Services Bureau as the Assistant Chief of Police.  

    Deborah Marson, CDFA, M.B.A., IACP Women’s Leadership Institute

    Deborah Marson teaches the financial wellness lesson of IACP’s Women’s Leadership Institute course, in which she discusses retirement, investments, estate planning, and other pertinent financial topics to law enforcement professionals from around the globe. Ms. Marson has over 12 years of experience specializing in comprehensive financial planning.  Her professional expertise in financial planning includes the areas of Budgeting, Investments, Tax Planning, Retirement, College Planning and Life, Disability and Long-Term Care Insurance.  

    Dr. Robert Cipriano

    Police Psychologist

    SIMCIP GROUP Forensic-Psychological Consultants

    Dr. Robert J. Cipriano Jr. has been working with the community professionally within the field of psychology for 22 years. His undergraduate training in psychology was completed at Florida State University and he completed a doctoral program accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) in clinical psychology at Carlos Albizu University in Miami, Florida. He completed his doctoral internship at one of the largest state hospitals that housed the “criminally insane” within the Central United States. He currently owns and has developed his training and consulting business, SIMCIP GROUP Forensic-Psychological Consultants, located in Pembroke Pines, Florida. 

    Ret. Deputy Chief Dianne Bernhard

    Executive Director

    Concerns of Police Survivors

    During her 21 years with the Columbia Police Department, Dianne Bernhard rose from patrol officer to deputy chief, supervised the Youth Services Unit, and served as the president of the Missouri School Resource Officer Association. 

    Bernhard retired from CPD to take a job as executive director of Concerns of Police Survivors — a national organization that supports the families of officers killed in the line of duty. Bernhard knows what it's like to lose a colleague. She said the hardest day of her career was when Officer Molly Bowden was killed during a traffic stop in 2005. 

    Bernhard joined CPD in 1992 as a patrol officer. Five years later, after serving as a detective and a community police officer, she was promoted to sergeant. In 2007, she was promoted to lieutenant and was responsible for daytime and evening patrols. She was promoted to deputy chief in 2012.

    As executive director, Bernhard leads an organization whose programs have helped 32,000 people. 

    Sgt. Kevin Kinney and Megan Kinney

    Sergeant Kevin Kinney is a Headquarters Sergeant with the State of South Dakota Highway Patrol. Kevin has been with the agency for over 17 years. One of his roles is working on officer and staff wellness and helping the officers learn how to be resilient in this type of job that tends to wear people out. 

    Megan Kinney has been married to Kevin Kinney for 20 years. She is very passionate about Officer Wellness and how the family is involved in supporting their officer. Megan and Kevin have four daughters that keep them pretty busy. 

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A series of virtual listening sessions that provide public safety personnel with information on the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on providing emergency services and responding to victims through vicarious trauma lens.

    A series of virtual listening sessions that provide public safety personnel with information on the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on providing emergency services and responding to victims through vicarious trauma lens. 

    Target Audience: Fire and Emergency Medical Services personnel

    Overall Objective: To provide Fire and EMS personnel with information on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and vicarious trauma strategies.

    Project Funding Provided By: The Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime.

    Includes: A series of virtual listening sessions featuring discussions between subject matter experts, including IACP President Chief Steven R. Casstevens, that provide Fire and EMS personnel with information on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on emergency responders, and vicarious trauma response strategies.

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Serving crime victims from linguistically diverse communities requires preparation and use of strategies embedded at all layers of the justice process. Framed around the seven critical needs of victims (safety, support, information, access, continuity, voice, justice), this webinar provides law enforcement and allied professionals an overview of legal obligations and standards around language access, tips for working with interpreters, and promising practices for police agencies. By addressing language access needs, agencies can eliminate or reduce barriers and support victims’ participation in the criminal justice system, thereby enhancing investigations, prosecution of crimes, and public safety.

    Serving crime victims from linguistically diverse communities requires preparation and use of strategies embedded at all layers of the justice process. Framed around the seven critical needs of victims (safety, support, information, access, continuity, voice, justice), this webinar provides law enforcement and allied professionals an overview of legal obligations and standards around language access, tips for working with interpreters, and promising practices for police agencies. By addressing language access needs, agencies can eliminate or reduce barriers and support victims’ participation in the criminal justice system, thereby enhancing investigations, prosecution of crimes, and public safety.

    Target Audience: Law enforcement and allied professionals (e.g., victim services personnel, communications personnel, crime scene personnel) 

    Overall Objectives: At the conclusion of the webinar, participants will be better able to: 1. Identify and give examples of the seven critical needs of victims. 2. Understand the language access compliance requirements of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. 3. Implement language access strategies in the justice system. 4. Identify points of contact in law enforcement agencies and system- and community-based victim service organizations. 

    Project Funding Provided By: Office for Victims of Crime (OVC)

    This presentation was developed by the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) under Cooperative Agreement 2018-V3-GX-K066 and the Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence (API-GBV) under Cooperative Agreement 2018-V3-GX-K061, both awarded by the Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this presentation are those of the contributors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the U.S. Department of Justice. 

    Shelli Sonnenberg

    Detective

    Boise, Idaho, Police Department

    Detective Shelli Sonnenberg graduated cum laude from the University of Idaho in 1998, with a degree in Crime and Justice Studies. Shelli began her law enforcement career with the Boise Police Department in 1999, at which time she was honored to be voted President of her POST Academy. She spent the first 4 years of her career working in patrol, 9 years on the Community Policing Team, as a Neighborhood Contact Officer and then the Refugee Liaison. The last 9 years she has been assigned to the Criminal Investigation Division, as a Detective. She is also a Crisis Negotiator and a member of the Honor Guard. In 2006, Detective Sonnenberg was chosen BPD Officer of the Year by her peers, something she considers a highlight in her career. Some of her most rewarding work came when she was the Refugee Liaison. Shelli worked closely with the refugee resettlement agencies and community outreach groups in the Boise area, providing educational and safety information to the New Americans when they arrive in the U.S. In turn, she created a Refugee Awareness curriculum to assist her fellow officers in the field and then created the Boise PD Interpreter/Translator Program, which is used to help officers and LEP persons communicate in a more efficient manner. This program is also used by the other agencies in the Treasure Valley when a language barrier exists. In 2009, Boise PD was honored by the Vera Institute of Justice as one of the top cities in the US who were “Bridging the Language Divide.

    Cannon Han

    Senior Program Manager

    Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence

    Cannon Han is a Senior Program Manager with API-GBV.  He has over ten years of experience providing technical assistance and training to programs on: Title VI compliance and advocacy; language access; interpretation; and translation. Prior to re-joining API, he was the Title VI Administrator for Caltrain and the San Mateo Transit District.  He also served as a Senior Court Services Analyst with the California Administrative Office of the Courts, Court Interpreter Program, and an attorney with the Mental Health Advocacy Project. 

    Heather Dooley

    Project Manager, IACP

    Heather Dooley is currently a Project Manager for the International Association of Chiefs of Police, and her portfolio includes primary management of the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) Enhancing Law Enforcement Response to Victims (ELERV) initiative and co-management of the OVC Law Enforcement-Based Victim Services (LEV) Program. Her responsibilities include oversight of demonstration sites teams and grantees, training content and resource development, and delivery of training and technical assistance on victim-centered, trauma-informed practices in law enforcement agencies. Ms. Dooley also served as an Advisory Board Member for the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) Measuring Success in the Criminal Justice System’s Response to Domestic/Dating Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking Assault, and Stalking: A Pilot Project. Before joining the IACP, Ms. Dooley served as the Social Services Program Coordinator for the Travis County Sheriff’s Office Victim Services Unit in Austin, TX, where she managed volunteer and internship programs, provided direct services to victims of crime and crisis circumstances, and provided training for Unit personnel and sworn personnel. Ms. Dooley has participated in a variety of community-wide collaborative efforts, including initiatives focused on enhancing sexual assault response, promoting a trauma-informed approach to intimate partner violence, and improving outcomes for children and families in the child welfare system. Ms. Dooley has a Master of Social Work degree and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A series of virtual listening sessions that provide law enforcement and first responder personnel with information on strategies and lessons learned around supporting victims and agency personnel as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    A series of virtual listening sessions that provide law enforcement and first responder personnel with information on strategies and lessons learned around supporting victims and agency personnel as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Target Audience: Law enforcement officers and first responder personnel

    Overall Objective: To provide information on the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on policing through a vicarious trauma lens.

    Project Funding Provided By: The Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime.

    Includes: A series of virtual listening sessions featuring discussions between subject matter experts, including IACP President Chief Steven R. Casstevens, that provide law enforcement officers and first responder personnel with information on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on policing and vicarious trauma response strategies.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    This webinar will cover specific, demonstrated approaches from an individual and agency perspective to identify, respond to, manage, and prevent distress that impacts an officer’s ability to do their job effectively.

    Stress is a normal reaction to daily pressures. Law enforcement officers’ stress can build up over the course of navigating difficult life and work events. When this stress becomes too much to deal with or overwhelms an officer’s coping mechanisms, distress can occur and impact safety and wellness. To maintain a healthy and optimal level of functioning, individuals and agencies must recognize when distress is occurring and be equipped to employ strategies to restore balance. Whether it is recognizing when yourself or your fellow officer might need more support or implementing organizational changes to support officer safety and wellness, everyone has a role to play when distress occurs. 

    Target Audience: Law enforcement officers

    Overall Objectives: To provide law enforcement officers with strategies to help prevent distress from occurring and to restore balance

    Project Funding Provided By: Bureau of Justice Assistance

    Includes: A webinar that highlights stress prevention approaches from an individual and agency perspective 

    Jennifer D. Griffin, Captain, PhD

    Captain / Ph.D.

    Delaware State Police / University of Delaware

    Captain Jennifer D. Griffin, Ph.D. is a Patrol Operations Commander and Chair of the Employee Wellness Unit for the Delaware State Police, an Adjunct Professor at the University of Delaware (U.D.), a certified Performance Coach, Yoga Alliance RYT 200 Yoga Instructor, and a Performance and Mental Training Coach for the U.D. Div. 1 Women’s Field Hockey Team. She has over 21 years of law enforcement experience in a variety of assignments and ranks. She has a Doctorate from the University of Delaware Sociology / Criminal Justice Department, where she currently teaches four classes. Captain Griffin is a peer-reviewed author and presents nationally and internationally to include: The United States of America, China, Taiwan, and Canada. She is an F.B.I. National Academy Associates Training Committee member & Comprehensive Officer Resiliency Program Master Instructor, and a recognized Resiliency Subject Matter Expert with the United States Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Collaborative Reform Initiative Technical Assistance Center (CRI-TAC). She is also a graduate of the F.B.I. National Academy graduate of Session 268, United States Secret Service Dignitary Protection Seminar, and the I.A.C.P. Leadership in Police Organizations (L.P.O.) Program. She has presented numerous times at both the I.A.C.P. Annual Conference and the I.A.C.P. Officer Safety and Wellness Symposium.

    Audrey Fellingham

    Officer

    Metropolitan Nashville, Tennessee, Police Department

    Audrey Fellingham has been a law enforcement officer for eight years total. She was first a patrol officer for Metropolitan Nashville Police Department in Nashville, TN. and currently is a patrol officer for Durham Police Department in North Carolina. Audrey is also a military veteran having served two tours of duty in Iraq while she was an active duty soldier assigned to 101st Airborne Division out of Fort Campbell, KY. and is currently an Army Reservist Staff Sergeant with the 377th CBRN Company.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A series of virtual listening sessions that provide first responder personnel with information around the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the field of victim advocacy. The sessions explore strategies and lessons learned to continue providing trauma informed services to victims while ensuring first responders are healthy and resilient.

    A series of virtual listening sessions that provide first responder personnel with information around the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the field of victim advocacy. The sessions explore strategies and lessons learned to continue providing trauma informed services to victims while ensuring first responders are healthy and resilient.

    Target Audience: Law enforcement officers, first responder personnel, and victim advocates/victim services personnel

    Overall Objective: To provide information on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the victim advocacy field and vicarious trauma response strategies.

    Project Funding Provided By: The Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime.

    Includes: A series of virtual listening sessions featuring discussions between subject matter experts, including IACP President Chief Steven R. Casstevens, that provide law enforcement officers, first responder personnel, and victim advocates with information on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, and vicarious trauma response strategies.

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Understanding the effects of grief, signs of complicated grief, and strategies that can be supportive after a loss is critical for officers to continue to be able to do their work effectively. Implementing policies and programs to help officers recognize and access appropriate supports to process the pain from grief and loss can help officers heal and agencies to continue to operate. This webinar will present both agency and individual best practices that can help officers heal and grow from grief and loss. Officers, command staff, law enforcement employee assistance program personnel, officer safety and wellness staff, and mental health professionals all have a role to play in helping individuals and agencies struggling with these issues and are encouraged to attend.

    Understanding the effects of grief, signs of complicated grief, and strategies that can be supportive after a loss is critical for officers to continue to be able to do their work effectively. Implementing policies and programs to help officers recognize and access appropriate supports to process the pain from grief and loss can help officers heal and agencies to continue to operate. This webinar will present both agency and individual best practices that can help officers heal and grow from grief and loss. Officers, command staff, law enforcement employee assistance program personnel, officer safety and wellness staff, and mental health professionals all have a role to play in helping individuals and agencies struggling with these issues and are encouraged to attend.

    Target Audience: Law enforcement professionals

    Overall Objective: To provide agencies and individuals with best practices that can help officers heal and grow from grief and loss

    Project Funding Provided By: Bureau of Justice Assistance

    Includes: A webinar featuring subject matter experts discussing strategies to help officers heal and grow from grief and loss

    Robert A. Swartz

    Detective/Director

    Taunton, Massachusetts, Police Department /Southeastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council CISM

    Detective Robert Swartz is a 32-year Law Enforcement veteran. Swartz is currently assigned to the City of Taunton Massachusetts Police Department’s Detective Division.  In addition, Detective Swartz was a key participant in the creation of the Southeastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council’s Critical Incident Stress Management and Peer Support Team.  Swartz has served as the Director/Commander since the team’s inception. He is personally familiar with trauma and the result of exposure and is a certified instructor in Critical Incident Stress Management.

    Lewis Schlosser, PhD

    Police Psychologist

    The Institute for Forensic Psychology

    Lewis Z. Schlosser, PhD, ABPP, is the managing partner at the Institute for Forensic Psychology, which is a police and public safety focused specialty practice based in Oakland, New Jersey. Dr. Schlosser is a licensed psychologist in New York (#16482), New Jersey (#4822), and Maine (PS2163). He is Board Certified in Police and Public Safety Psychology (#8539) and Counseling Psychology (#6558) by the American Board of Professional Psychology. He is a former tenured Associate Professor at Seton Hall University and former in-house Director of Psychological Services for the New York City Correction Department. Dr. Schlosser has conducted over 10,000 law enforcement psychological evaluations, including pre-employment, promotional, and fitness for duty evaluations. He provides training to police personnel on a variety of topics related to officer mental health, with special expertise in officer wellness and fitness for duty.Dr. Schlosser is a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, Police Psychological Services Section. He currently serves on the Executive Board of the Police Psychological Services Section as the General Chair. Dr. Schlosser is also an affiliate member of the New Jersey State Association of Chiefs of Police and the Bergen County Police Chief's Association. He was recently named as the first Chief Psychologist for the New Jersey Association of Chiefs of Police. He is a member of the New Jersey Police Surgeons. Dr. Schlosser is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association.Dr. Schlosser earned his Bachelor’s degree in Psychology, his Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling, and his PhD in Counseling Psychology, all from the University of Maryland at College Park.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar will guide anti-human trafficking task forces through the stages of group development and provide evaluation metrics for self-assessment and strategic planning.

    Navigating the Roadmap: A Guide to Development and Operations for Multidisciplinary Anti-Human Trafficking Task Forces: A webinar that discusses the stages of group development with assessment metrics that are designed to assist interdisciplinary groups with achieving and assessing collaborative impact as teams.

    Target Audience: Law Enforcement Personnel, Prosecutors, Victim Service Providers, and Allied Stakeholders

    Overall Objective: To provide anti-human trafficking task forces with a tool to identify needs and gaps in processes, collaboration, growth, performance, and progress toward requirements of grant funding (if applicable); to reinforce that development of a multidisciplinary task force is a process that requires time, attention, and intention; and to equip task forces with resources that support capacity building and sustainability.  

    Project Funding Provided By: This product is supported by the International Association of Chiefs of Police under 2020-VT-BX-K002 awarded by the Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this product are those of the contributors and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

    Includes: A webinar that will help participants to classify four distinct areas of work in which task force efforts are grounded, describe the process of task force development through five stages, communicate two practical ways in which they can use the Roadmap in their jurisdiction, and identify two ways that conducting a task force self-assessment using the Roadmap can identify gaps and/or develop strategies for improving the collaborative functioning of a task force.

    Please consider having a copy of the Development and Operations Roadmap handy for your reference during this webinar. You can also see the Roadmap in the Handouts section in IACPlearn. 

    To learn more about IACP’s anti-human trafficking resources, go to the https://www.theiacp.org/projects/anti-human-trafficking-training-and-technical-assistance.

    Erin Albright, JD

    Co-Director of Project Roadmap

    ICF

    Erin Albright is the Co-Director of Project Roadmap, which provides expert technical assistance to human trafficking task forces across the United States. She is an internationally recognized anti-trafficking expert with over a dozen years of experience establishing, guiding, and funding initiatives of all sizes and at every stage of development. Her work focuses on building capacity to combat labor trafficking, development and operations of multi-disciplinary teams, and improving law enforcement responses to human trafficking. A subject matter expert for the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the United Nations Office on Drugs & Crime, the US Commission on Human Rights, and the California Office of Emergency Services, she has also worked globally with countries from Armenia to Uzbekistan. In the United States, her partners and clients range from the Department of Justice and the American Bar Association to 23 state and local task forces. 

    Her most recent accolade was a three-year Visiting Fellowship with the DOJ’s Office for Victims of Crime, where she created new frameworks for this rapidly evolving field. A graduate of Mary Washington College, and Boston College Law School, Albright is a member of the Massachusetts Bar.

    Alissa M. Huntoon

    Senior Policy Advisor & Law Enforcement Program Coordinator

    United States Department of Justice Office for Victims of Crime

    Alissa Huntoon is the Senior Policy Advisor & Law Enforcement Program Coordinator at the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) within the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs. Serving within the Human Trafficking Division, she manages anti-human trafficking task force programming that intersects with law enforcement and prosecution. Before joining OVC, Ms. Huntoon was a Senior Policy Advisor at the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), where she developed and implemented national criminal justice policy initiatives and supported general front office operations for the BJA Policy Office. Some examples from her BJA portfolio include managing anti-human trafficking task force programming, community-based crime reduction initiatives, justice information sharing and violence reduction programs, the Smart Policing Initiative, police-research partnerships, and improving crime analysis capabilities within law enforcement.  

    Prior to joining BJA, Ms. Huntoon worked for the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) where she oversaw grant programs that advance policy and practice within the law enforcement profession. Before joining the IACP, she worked for Circle Solutions, Inc., providing research and evaluation services for the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) supporting the Cops in Schools program. In graduate school, she interned within the National Institute of Justice. Ms. Huntoon holds a Master’s of Public Policy from American University and a B.A. in Sociology with an emphasis in criminal justice from the University of Minnesota –Twin Cities.

    Kristen McGeeney (Moderator)

    Project Manager

    IACP

    Kristen McGeeney is a Project Manager in the Programs division of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and has been with the IACP for four years. She oversees the day-to-day programmatic, logistic, and financial details of several projects focused on providing innovative and victim-centered training and technical assistance (TTA) on human trafficking and gender-based violence to law enforcement and allied partners. Currently, she manages the National Human Trafficking Training & Technical Assistance Program for Enhanced Collaborative Model (ECM) Task Forces, which provides training on emerging techniques and best practices to support trauma-informed and victim-centered investigations and prosecutions of human trafficking; address core multidisciplinary task force operational needs; and build trust between persons subjected to  human trafficking and justice system personnel.  

    Prior to joining the IACP, Kristen served as a Special Investigator with the University of Maryland Office of Civil Rights & Sexual Misconduct, as the Title IX Coordinator at St. Mary’s College of Maryland, and as a police corporal at McDaniel College Department of Campus Safety, where she specialized in conducting trauma-informed investigations of gender-based violence. Kristen has been conducting law enforcement training on gender-based violence since 2012, and is a former trustee of the Rape Crisis Intervention Service of Carroll County, MD. Kristen is a graduate of McDaniel College in Westminster, MD and is currently pursuing a Master of Public Health (MPH) at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, where she is violence prevention fellow with the Bloomberg American Health Initiative.

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This conference workshop presentation discusses how law enforcement agencies of all sizes are utilizing innovative technology to place high-quality officer wellness tools directly into the hands of officers, including tools for alcohol abuse, anger management, compassion fatigue, depression, family support, financial fitness, mindfulness, peer support, PTSD, resilience development, sleep optimization, suicide prevention, trauma, work-life balance and much more.

    This conference workshop presentation discusses how law enforcement agencies of all sizes are utilizing innovative technology to place high-quality officer wellness tools directly into the hands of officers, including tools for alcohol abuse, anger management, compassion fatigue, depression, family support, financial fitness, mindfulness, peer support, PTSD, resilience development, sleep optimization, suicide prevention, trauma, work-life balance and much more. Viewers will learn how to leverage technology to strengthen existing officer wellness programs, and how to build new officer wellness programs from the ground up.

    David Black, Chief Psychologist California Police Chiefs Assoc. Wellness Committee / Ph.D. Clinical Psychology / Licensed Psychologist (CA)

    CEO and Chief Psychologist

    CORDICO

    Dr. David Black is the Founder and CEO of CORDICO, serving hundreds of law enforcement agencies nationally. He is the Chief Psychologist of the California Police Chiefs Association Wellness Committee, and a Founding Board Member of the National Sheriffs Association Psychological Services Group. Dr. Black is also an Advisory Board Member for the National Police Foundation’s Center for Mass Violence Response Studies, serves on the IACP Police Psychological Services Ethics Committee, serves on the National Fraternal Order of Police Officer Wellness Committee and Provider Evaluation Subcomittee, and is an Officer Wellness subject matter expert for the California Commission on POST. Dr. Black has been serving law enforcement since 2002.

    John Carli

    Chief of Police (Ret)

    California Police Chief?s Association Wellness Committee

    Police Chief John Carli has 32 years of experience and is recognized as a progressive and innovative leader in law enforcement. As an outspoken advocate and thought leader for the law enforcement profession, Carli?s most relevant work focuses on national best practices in policing, technology, public policy, and officer safety and wellness. In the summer of 2016, Chief Carli was summoned to the White House to meet with President Obama In the wake of national high profile policing events and civil unrest. Since then he has dedicated his time and efforts to improve the profession and implement change. Recognizing the gap between officers in crisis and the need for early prevention strategies, Carli embarked on implementing a radical culture shift to create psychological resiliency within first responders. John?s preventive approach to promoting this culture of wellness led to his development of a unique ?Law Enforcement Wellness App? that was highlighted at the Police Executive Research Forum (PERF) national town-hall meeting focusing on police officer suicides. Under Carli?s leadership, the Vacaville Police Department was recognized as the 2020 top agency in the nation by the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Foundation, receiving the ?Destination Zero? Officer Safety and Wellness award. Chief Carli is an Executive Fellow with the National Police Foundation, focusing on the continuous improvement within the policing profession throughout his career. Carli represents the California Police Chief?s Association as the chair of the California Data Sharing Task Force, focusing on best practice strategies for law enforcement technology and information system sharing, and is a member of the California Attorney General?s Advisory Committee.