Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Category
Search by Format
Sort By
Search by Type
Search by Category
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Type
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Two stories of how a police department helped their officers recover and become productive leaders and officers within the agency. One became the Deputy Chief of Police, and the other became the department's CIT Coordinator and Peer Support Officer. Each reached their recovery in wildly divergent means, but both were ultimately successful. One supervisor was responsible for bringing both officers into recovery, and he shares his trauma on dealing with this issue twice over.

    Presentation Description: Two stories of how a police department helped their officers recover and become productive leaders and officers within the agency. One became the Deputy Chief of Police, and the other became the department's CIT Coordinator and Peer Support Officer. Each reached their recovery in wildly divergent means, but both were ultimately successful. One supervisor was responsible for bringing both officers into recovery, and he shares his trauma on dealing with this issue twice over.

    Methodology: This is a multiple-speaker presentation with intensely personal stories of addiction and recovery. It includes the trauma of a supervisor who had to deal with both officers and how it affected him. This is a side of recovery we often don't hear about. A police psychologist moderates and guides the speakers through his experience in trauma, officer wellness, and recovery. He also presents a Powerpoint presentation on trauma and recovery.

    • Upon completion, participants will see that an agency can benefit from helping employees recover. Officers in recovery are valuable assets to an agency and have a distinct knowledge basis that makes them better officers and employees.
    • Upon completion, participants will be able to understand that we must break through the stigma that reaching out for help is detrimental to a police career.
    • Upon completion, participants will be able to see that we need to encourage police executives to watch for early signs of problems with their officers and get them the help they need before it is too late!

    Shaun McColgan

    Deputy Chief of Police-Retired

    Danbury, Connecticut, Police Department

    I am a semi-retired Deputy Police Chief with forty years as a Police Officer. I started my career with the NYPD in 1984 and moved to the Danbury, CT, Police Department in 1990. I have served as a Detective and Detective Supervisor, Sergeant, Lieutenant, and Deputy Chief. I commanded one hundred sixty sworn personnel and approximately a dozen non-sworn personnel. I retired as Deputy Chief in June of 2022 but remain a Special Police Officer (part-time). I have served on numerous mental health boards in CT since 2005. I am an FBI-trained hostage negotiator and was our department's team leader for many years. I am also certified as a CIT Officer and Coordinator and do peer support. I have traveled nationwide, speaking on CIT and Officer wellness issues. I am also nine-plus years into my recovery from alcohol addiction, thanks to the support of the Danbury Police Department.

    Peter Elste

    Police Officer

    Danbury, Connecticut, Police Department

    My name is Peter Elste and I have 24 years of service as a Police Officer. I served as a Patrol Officer for 4 years at 73rd Precinct in Brownsville Brooklyn, NY and have been a Patrol Officer with the City of Danbury, CT for the last 20 years. I am the Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Coordinator for the Department, a Field Training Officer, a Peer Support team member, a former Emergency Services Unit (ESU) as a sniper and entry specialist. I am a former board member for the Connecticut Alliance to Benefit Law Enforcement (CABLE) and currently serve on the board for Responder Wellness Inc as the Police Liaison. I am a decorated officer frequently recognized for my ability to effectively de-escalate calls and for organizing training and learning opportunities for the entire Department around Mental Health and High Risk individuals. I am the recipient of the Officer of the Year award in 2010 and an advocate for increasing awareness and support for Officer's mental health and wellbeing. I am the proud father of 2 children and a former World Class Soccer coach.

    Dara Rampersad

    Chief First Responder Psychologist

    BluePaz

    Dr. Dara Rampersad, PhD is a First Responder and Forensic psychologist who is licensed in both Arizona and Hawaii. He is certified in Crisis Intervention Teams (CIT) as a CIT Coordinator, and is trained in Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) and FBI- Crisis Negotiator Teams (CNT). In addition, Dr. Rampersad is licensed as a professional counselor in Colorado, and is nationally board certified in counseling, with over 25 years of experience in the mental health field.
    Dr. Rampersad owns and operates BluePaz First Responder Services, which hosts annual first responder health and wellness conferences and provides counseling, consulting, coaching, critical incident stress debriefings, and training to first responders and their departments on resiliency, stress management and other pertinent topics.
    Dr. Rampersad helped to start the world’s first hospital-based CIT program, and he currently serves as the Security Special Operations Senior Director of Crisis Services for a large multi-state hospital system. He was also a Professor of Practice at Arizona State University where he was creating a first of its kind program to teach counselors how to treat First Responders. In addition, he was an instructor at the Naval Postgraduate School- Executive Leadership Program training law enforcement agencies, fire departments, hospital staff, paramedics, and other first responders on Crisis Response, PTSD, Resiliency and Mental Health Tactical Intervention (MHTI).
    Dr. Rampersad is a founding member and first President of the Arizona CIT Association. He also served on the CIT International board of directors and is an active board member of EMSHelp, Mesa Police Department mental health advisory board, and Phoenix Fire Department paramedic training advisory board.

    Michael Sturdevant

    Deputy Chief of Police

    Danbury, Connecticut, Police Department

    A results-oriented, high-energy Law Enforcement Deputy Chief with over twenty-nine years of progressively responsible service in leadership, decision-making, and extensive knowledge of criminal law and procedures. A proven team leader with a focus on innovative thinking and the ability to continuously follow through with and implement new projects while maintaining the core mission and objectives of the Department and the safety and well-being of the community and the men and women of the department.
  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    This session explores the growth that can come from difficult times and challenging situations. Presenters will introduce the concept of post-traumatic growth and how finding meaning from experiences can be protective and strengthening for resilience and overall mental health and wellness.

    Presentation Description: In life and work, the challenges will keep coming. This session explores the growth that can come from difficult times and challenging situations. Presenters will introduce the concept of post-traumatic growth and how finding meaning from experiences can be protective and strengthening for resilience and overall mental health and wellness.

    • Upon completion, participants will be able to understand what happens to your neurological, physical, psychological, emotional, and spiritual health when you listen to traumatic stories day after day by exploring the characteristics of post-traumatic growth and vicarious trauma.
    • Upon completion, participants will be able to safeguard well-being by examining how meaning-making can be used as a powerful protective factor.
    • Upon completion, participants will be able to recognize the characteristics of growth including greater appreciation of life, sense of increased personal strength, and the sense for greater possibilities.

    Anthony Maez

    Deputy Commander

    The Innocent Justice Foundation

    Anthony Maez, BS is a recognized national trainer and lecturer in various areas of law enforcement. He has provided extensive training on violent crime investigations, technology used to stalk, internet crimes against children, and human trafficking investigations. Drawing on his vast knowledge, he authored several investigative guides for law enforcement and prosecutors in these critical subjects.

    Beth Medina

    CEO/Program Director

    The Innocent Justice Foundation

    Beth Medina, MFT serves as the CEO/Program Director at The Innocent Justice Foundation where she works in collaboration with the SHIFT and HART teams and provides oversight for the programs. Beth has more than 20 years of experience in non-profit, education and mental health fields. She is an International speaker, trainer and advocate on topics related to trauma recovery and mental health and wellness. She holds a Master's Degree in Marriage and Family Therapy and a B.A. in Political Science/History.

    Anthony M. Maez is a Deputy Commander with the Albuquerque Police Department (APD) and former Special Agent in Charge with the Office of New Mexico Attorney General and the Commander of the New Mexico Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) and Human Trafficking Task Forces. Anthony has been in law enforcement in New Mexico for over 34 years. Anthony trains and consults nationally and internationally for the Innocent Justice Foundation, Supporting Heroes in Mental Health Foundational Training (SHIFT). He holds Bachelor of Science degree in Occupational Education from Wayland Baptist University and a Master of Arts in Business and Organizational Security Management from Webster University.
  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Using the strategic career model, participants will be able to identify skills, plan for their future, and ask themselves important questions in their own career journey and can address the significant health and wellness issues police agencies face today.

    Presentation Description: Law enforcement professionals need career and professional development now more than ever. Given the climate, the recruiting and retention crisis, and the evolving landscape of expectations, professional growth and career development have taken a back seat. In this session, we will cover the foundational concepts of career planning and professional development. Using the strategic career model, participants will be able to identify skills, plan for their future, and ask themselves important questions in their own career journey and can address the significant health and wellness issues police agencies face today. Participants will leave with a strategic career framework and significant resources to support their journey.

    Methodology: This is an interactive single-speaker presentation. Career development is an important way to enhance employee engagement, increase recruitment and retention, provide career paths for sworn and civilian staff, support professional wellness, and ensure that everyone in the agency has the skills necessary to create value in community safety. At the conclusion, the participants will leave with resources and a framework they can apply immediately upon return to their agency. Empowering officers and civilians to take ownership of their career improves organizational and personal wellness. This session was built primarily through personal experience of the presenter, and supported by evidence-based research from leadership, management, and career development academic studies.

    • 1. Increase and enhance your ability to make self-directed professional development plans (known as individual development plans);
    • 2. Foster a strategic view toward life-long learning and development through devising a career planning strategy;
    • 3. Enable professional skill development for present and future success through reflection, awareness, planning, and revision.

    Colin May

    Senior Advisor

    U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), Office of Inspector General (OIG), Office of Investigation

    Colin May, M.S., CFE, 3CE, INCI is the Senior Advisor for the HUD OIG Office of Investigation; previously he was the Assistant Director of Strategy and Training for the HUD OIG Office of Investigation where he is responsible for the design, development, delivery, and assessment of training to nearly 200 special agents, forensic auditors, investigative analysts, and professional staff across the country. In addition, he oversees and manages the performance review process, the after-action review/lessons learned process, and strategy development for the component. A career investigator, he joined HUD OIG as a Forensic Auditor in January 2021 after serving as a Bankruptcy Auditor with the Office of the United States Trustee, U.S. Department of Justice. Prior to joining the U.S. Trustee Program, Colin was a Special Agent with the U.S. Department of Commerce, Office of Export Enforcement (OEE); he began his career as a Special Agent with the U.S. Department of Defense, conducting financial investigations. Colin’s education includes a B.S. from Siena College, a M.S. from Stevenson University, and graduate certificates from Northeastern University (forensic accounting), the University of Southern Maine (leadership studies), and Purdue University (strategic communications). A Certified Fraud Examiner and Certified Cyber Crime Examiner, and a National Certified Instructor from the International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards and Training (IADLEST), Colin has also authored several articles, which have appeared in Fraud Magazine, Fraud Examiner, the FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, Security Management, Police Chief Magazine, Training and Standards Director Magazine. He is a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the Police Executive Research Forum, and the National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives.
  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    This presentation will focus on what a suicidal person thinks and feels, to allow for a peer to emotionally validate them. Most importantly, this presentation will tell attendees how to identify suicidal ideations, intents, and plans and, regardless of your role, how to convey to the suicidal individual that they should be addressing these thoughts. Furthermore, discussing what the suicidal individual should do and what a peer should tell the suicidal individual to do. The presenter will model what to say and how to say it.

    Presentation Description: This presentation will focus on what a suicidal person thinks and feels, to allow for a peer to emotionally validate them. Most importantly, this presentation will tell attendees how to identify suicidal ideations, intents, and plans and, regardless of your role, how to convey to the suicidal individual that they should be addressing these thoughts. Furthermore, discussing what the suicidal individual should do and what a peer should tell the suicidal individual to do. The presenter will model what to say and how to say it.

    • to articulate how suicidal persons should view their suicidal thoughts, and how you should tell them to view their suicidal thoughts
    • to identify 3 immediate and evidenced-based skills that a suicidal person can implement when acute distress spikes
    • to identify 3 things you can say to emotionally validate the suicidal person

    Stephanie Barone McKenny, PhD

    Police Psychologist, Los Angeles, California, Police Department

    Dr. Stephanie Barone McKenny is an LAPD police psychologist who provides consultation to several elite units including SWAT, Air Support Division, and undercover agents. She has worked with law enforcement personnel at the international, national, state, county, and local levels.  Dr. McKenny is also a Diplomate in Sports Psychology, a Nationally Certified Sports Psychologist, a Certified Trauma Professional, and she is Certified in Integrative Medicine for holistic health (mind-body-spirit).  

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Improving officer safety and wellness starts with leadership and organizational culture change, as well as encouragement to seek out and receive help. With this focus, law enforcement can improve outcomes in their approaches to responding to those who are having a mental health crisis.

    Presentation Description: Suicide is a significant public health problem and eliminating veteran suicide is a top Veterans Affairs (VA) priority. The VA has many initiatives that target veterans who are in high-risk populations, to include law enforcement. Many officers who are military veterans are at higher risk for suicide due to multiple identities and other factors. The VA Suicide Prevention Office has partnered with the VA Police Service to address officer health and wellness. Improving officer safety and wellness starts with leadership and organizational culture change, as well as encouragement to seek out and receive help. With this focus, law enforcement can improve outcomes in their approaches to responding to those who are having a mental health crisis.

    • Upon completion, participants will describe what the VA is currently doing to identify suicide prevention as a public health crisis and eliminating suicide among Veterans, many who are in law enforcement positions.
    • Upon completion, participants will understand what and how the VA is working to improve outcomes when responding to Veterans having a mental health crisis.
    • Upon completion, participants will learn strategies for improving organizational culture to better address officer safety and wellness.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    This presentation will discuss how the expansion of police training related to de-escalation and crisis intervention response has helped to improve officers' skills and communications in the community. Specifically, as administrators of the Peer Support and the Hostage Negotiations Teams, presenters have learned that there are shared skills among these personnel that are crucial to their success.

    Presentation Description: This presentation will discuss how the expansion of police training related to de-escalation and crisis intervention response has helped to improve officers' skills and communications in the community. Specifically, as administrators of the Peer Support and the Hostage Negotiations Teams, presenters have learned that there are shared skills among these personnel that are crucial to their success. These skills include empathy, active listening, critical thinking, emotional intelligence, and self-awareness. Though not everyone will meet these qualifications, it is essential that these skills are identified and enhanced. Presenters will share examples of techniques that can assist in selecting and training a peer team.

    • Upon completion, participants will be able to understand the best practices in research and training related to de-escalation and crisis intervention within your department's peer support program as well as in the community.
    • Upon completion, participants will be able to describe the five essential skills needed for an effective peer support team member.
    • Upon completion, participants will be able to conduct techniques that can be used when assessing if an individual has the skills needed to be an effective peer support team member.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Presenters will outline lessons learned from their three-year implementation timeline, which will cover various topics, including: leveraging local trends and national politics, establishing community partnerships, creating buy in through intentional introductions to program elements, wellness team staffing, universal assessments, intersection between wellness staff and command staff, removing barriers to accessing care, creating a culture that advocates for wellness, and techniques for improving family engagement.

    Presentation Description: Richland County, South Carolina, Sheriff's Department presenters will engage participants as they learn strategies that have made a top-down wellness program successful in the state's largest sheriff's department. Presenters will outline lessons learned from their three-year implementation timeline, which will cover various topics, including: leveraging local trends and national politics, establishing community partnerships, creating buy in through intentional introductions to program elements, wellness team staffing, universal assessments, intersection between wellness staff and command staff, removing barriers to accessing care, creating a culture that advocates for wellness, and techniques for improving family engagement.

    • Participants will be able to describe the three main components of a comprehensive wellness program.
    • Participants will be able to identify at least five strategies of implementation.
    • Participants will be able to identify three organizational components necessary for sustainability.

    Allison Farrell

    Director of Wellness and Resiliency

    Richland County, South Carolina, Sheriff's Department

    Allison Farrell, MPH, LISW-CP, CPM is the Director of Wellness and Resiliency at the Richland County Sheriff’s Department (RCSD) under the direction of Sheriff Leon Lott in South Carolina. She graduated from the College of Charleston with a Bachelor of Science in Psychology, New York University with a Master of Public Health (MPH) and the University of South Carolina with a Masters in Social Work (MSW). Prior to working with the Richland County Sheriff's Department Allison held several positions with the South Carolina Department of Mental Health (SCDMH) including that of the agencies Law Enforcement Liaison, and Director of the Office of Emergency Services where she provided oversight to the provision of mobile crisis services in 46 counties, partnered with state and local law enforcement agencies to build Crisis Intervention Teams (CIT) and supervised the Office of Suicide Prevention. Allison is an Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Interface and Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) Master Trainer. In 2022 she earned the credential of Certified Public Manager (CPM). She is a Licensed Independent Social Worker- Clinical Practicioner (LISW-CP) and is trained in Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) and Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM). Allison is the handler for “CJ”, RCSD’s Crisis Intervention K-9.

    Maria Yturria

    Deputy Chief of Professional Development

    Richland County, South Carolina, Sheriff's Department

    Major Maria Yturria is a graduate of the FBI National Academy Class 270 serves as Major, of Professional Development for the Richland County Sheriff’s Department. Maria began her career with the department in 2003; her assignments include uniform patrol deputy, investigator, victim advocate, and Public Information Officer. Major Yturria serves on the Deputy Advisory Council; team leader of the Crisis Management Team; and holds certifications as Hostage/Crisis Negotiator; Statewide Peer Support Team Leader; Self Defense instructor and an active member of AUSA. She continually worked with Federal, State, and local agencies in cases involving illegal immigration, drug prevention and human trafficking; and works closely with many private non-profit organizations to better serve and educate the community on law enforcement issues. Maria has been recognized as a Palmetto Center for Women Honors recipient in Govt. and Policing; Threat Suppression Award of Excellence in Policing and Deputy of the year by the American Legion Post Chapin. Maria was born in Mexico, raised in California and currently resides in Chapin with her husband and their daughter named Harley.
  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    In this session, learn the five elements that every law enforcement family needs to know to counter the effect of the spillover which impacts a couple's communication, connection, and intimacy - essential parts of a healthy relationship.

    Presentation Description: Officers cannot just "turn it off" when they arrive home to their families. It can be difficult for officers to not bring the work home, where their experiences can negatively impact their personal lives. On the flip side, home life can spill over and negatively impact an officer at work. The challenges of finding a balance are not new - however, if law enforcement families work on a plan to find a balance and protect their home life, it will help to strengthen family and officer wellbeing. In this session, learn the five elements that every law enforcement family needs to know to counter the effect of the spillover which impacts a couple's communication, connection, and intimacy - essential parts of a healthy relationship.

    • Identify elements of classical conditioning that spill over from officer training and potentially negatively impact communication and connection in relationships and at home.
    • Detect elements of spillover in connection and communication in a law enforcement relationship, including behavioral conditioning and negative narratives.
    • Apply methods to educate officers and supportive partners on the spillover and positive impact of connection and communication, creating the possibility for greater officer safety.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    During this session, attendees will learn how running a family support program can have minimal cost and high impact on your agency.

    Presentation Description: Departments across the country are fighting concurrent struggles of recruitment, retention, and officer resilience. Agencies are subsequently paying more in personnel costs than they ever have before and wondering how they can sustain the pay that is needed to recruit and retain the best of the best. Offering family support is a valuable opportunity to impact officers, not only in the moment but for the rest of their lives. During this session, attendees will learn how running a family support program can have minimal cost and high impact on your agency.

    • will be able to understand what family support is.
    • will be able to understand the impact that offering family support to their department will have on recruiting, retention, and resilience.
    • will be able to understand the different options that have been successful previously that they can implement with maximum impact within their own department,

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Learn how a united, multi-agency effort has ignited a ripple effect across the county that is strengthening wellness programs, reducing stigma, and creating a diverse network of mental health and peer support.

    Presentation Description: Many agencies must go it alone when it comes to wellness. Limited by resources and overwhelmed with demands, departments may struggle to meet employee wellness needs. In Greater Cincinnati, Ohio, wellness teams from Cincinnati Police Department, Cincinnati Fire Department, and Hamilton County Sheriff's Office have successfully implemented a collaborative model to divide joint administrative needs and share resources. Eliminating the proverbial reinvention of the wheel has allowed coordinators to place more focus on direct employee support while increasing wellness innovation within their own departments. Learn how a united, multi-agency effort has ignited a ripple effect across the county that is strengthening wellness programs, reducing stigma, and creating a diverse network of mental health and peer support.

    • Participants will learn how to apply inter-agency wellness collaboration to increase program effectiveness, decrease agency cost, and increase accessibility of training and resources.
    • Participants will be able to describe a framework for a comprehensive, multi-dimensional approach to responding to a potentially traumatic event (PTE).
    • Participants will be able to demonstrate how standardization of best practices in first responder wellness benefits a region and increases quality of wellness services within an agency.