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  • Volunteers in Policing Training (March 2021)

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes Multiple Live Events. The next is on 03/24/2021 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    The Volunteers in Policing Training includes virtual training materials, tip sheets, and surveys for agencies to use in there volunteer programs.

    The Volunteers in Policing Training includes virtual training materials, tip sheets, and surveys for agencies to use in there volunteer programs.

    Target Audience: Law enforcement professionals

    Overall Objective: To provide support and resources for agencies interested in developing or enhancing a volunteer program, increasing their use of volunteers in existing programs, and engaging community members’ participation. 

    Includes: This training covers the following topics: organizational readiness, changing trends, volunteering during a pandemic or natural disaster, recruitment and retention, risk management and liability, performance management, recognition strategies, recordkeeping, and program documentation. Participants will receive group technical assistance throughout the training.

    Marjorie Trachtman, CVA

    Volunteer Coordinator, Bellevue, Washington, Police Department

    Ms. Trachtman has spent her career building innovative programs and high-performing teams in both the public and private sectors. For the last 26 years she has the managed the Bellevue Police Department’s Citizens and Police in Partnership citizen volunteer program. This program, which received IACP’s Excellence Award in 2007 and again in 2016, serves as a model for other law enforcement agencies throughout the country. Many of its policies and practices have been incorporated into industry-wide best-practice standards. In 2018, Ms. Trachtman established and currently leads a statewide association of law enforcement volunteer managers in Washington State to foster networking and professional development among those who have responsibility for this valuable resource. She regularly is called upon to provide training and support to public and non-profit organizations across the country as they look to develop or revitalize their own volunteer programs.

    Ms. Trachtman holds the Certified in Volunteer Administration (CVA) credential from the Council for Certification in Volunteer Administration (CCVA) and served for 3 years as a Peer Assessment Committee member for new credential applicants. She has served as a steering committee member of the Volunteer Administrators Network Northwest (VANNW) and has volunteered her expertise to non-profit programs through 501 Commons Executive Service Corps. She also developed and taught a continuing education class in Volunteer Management at Bellevue College.

  • Social Media Matters: Why Law Enforcement Leaders Should Embrace Strategic Communication Through Social Media

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 03/24/2021 at 11:00 AM (EDT)

    From a pandemic to civil unrest to police reform, it’s more important than ever that law enforcement effectively uses the communication tools at their disposal to impact the conversation. Whether we like it or not, social media has become the main source of information for many of those with whom we seek to communicate. In this one-hour seminar Chief Christopher Mannino, with a decade of experience in managing law enforcement public messaging and teaching communication strategies across the country, discusses why it is critical for law enforcement agencies to not only have a presence of social media, but an effective strategy as well, and how effective use of social media can be used by law enforcement leaders to build community trust in their agencies, impact the public conversation on law enforcement topics, and positively impact the culture of their departments. This timely course is brought to you by the Public Information Officer’s Section of the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

    From a pandemic to civil unrest to police reform, it’s more important than ever that law enforcement effectively uses the communication tools at their disposal to impact the conversation. Whether we like it or not, social media has become the main source of information for many of those with whom we seek to communicate. In this one-hour seminar Chief Christopher Mannino, with a decade of experience in managing law enforcement public messaging and teaching communication strategies across the country, discusses why it is critical for law enforcement agencies to not only have a presence of social media, but an effective strategy as well, and how effective use of social media can be used by law enforcement leaders to build community trust in their agencies, impact the public conversation on law enforcement topics, and positively impact the culture of their departments. This timely course is brought to you by the Public Information Officer’s Section of the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

    Target Audience: Chiefs of Police, law enforcement leaders tasked with overseeing the public message, and Public Information Officers

    Overall Objectives: By the end of this course participants will be able to explain the importance of law enforcement agencies having a robust, strategic presence on social media, including impacting public perception on important matters related to law enforcement, building positive relationships between a law enforcement agency and the community and enhancing trust, public safety messaging to reduce crime and increase traffic safety, and positively impacting the internal law enforcement culture.

    Includes: A seminar featuring subject matter experts discussing the importance of law enforcement effectively utilizing communication tools to impact conversations on law enforcement topics and positively impact the culture of their departments. 

    Christopher Mannino

    Chief of Police, Park Forest, Illinois, Police Department

    In his 24th year in law enforcement, Christopher Mannino serves as Chief of Police of the Park Forest Police Department in suburban Chicago. He has served in a wide variety of law enforcement roles throughout his career, including assignments in the patrol division, investigations division, administration division, special operations, as the Field Training Coordinator, and as a team leader with a regional Mobile Field Force. Chief Mannino holds a Master’s Degree in Political and Justice Studies from Governors State University and is a graduate of the 237th session of the FBI National Academy, an international executive police leadership course where he was chosen by his classmates as a section representative. He is also a Certified Police Chief through the Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police. Chief Mannino is an experienced public speaker, speaking at a variety of engagements for law enforcement organizations and conferences throughout the US. He is also an instructor on law enforcement communication and public relations, teaching at law enforcement training units across the country. Chief Mannino serves on the Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police Executive Board, on the Illinois Association of Chiefs of Police Diversity Committee, on the South Suburban Association Chiefs of Police Executive Board, on Illinois Representative Anthony DeLuca’s Public Safety Committee, on the Intergovernmental Risk Management Agency Chiefs’ Steering Committee and on the Village of Park Forest National League of Cities Race Equity and Leadership Steering Committee.

  • IACP Women's Leadership Institute: March - May 2021

    Contains 0 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 03/23/2021 at 2:00 PM (EDT)

    This nine-week virtual training, consisting of two virtual live events each week, is intended for women leaders and those developing women leaders. This training teaches attendees evidence-informed leadership theories to help them inspire followers, lead groups, and achieve organizational goals.

    The IACP Women’s Leadership Institute (WLI) is a leadership training program for female leaders and those developing female leaders. The curriculum is focused on teaching participants evidence-informed leadership theories to help them inspire followers, lead groups, and achieve organizational goals—all in the context of better understanding the unique challenges women face in the workplace. 

    Spanning nine weeks in duration, this course consists of two virtual live events a week led by IACP-certified instructors, at-home assignments to support learning application efforts, and virtual (and optional) social events to facilitate participant networking throughout the nine weeks.

    Note on Course Participation: In addition to the two live events that will take place per week, participants are expected to do work outside of class on homework assignments and group projects. The estimated time per week spent on activities outside of live events is two to three hours. Further, participants must attend 12 out of 16 live events in order to receive their certificates of completion.

  • National Law Enforcement First-Line Supervisor Training on Violence Against Women

    Contains 75 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes Multiple Live Events. The next is on 03/10/2021 at 1:00 PM (EST)

    IACP’s National Law Enforcement First-Line Supervisor Training on Violence Against Women is an unprecedented opportunity for individuals who hold primary responsibility for overseeing first-line officers to explore current approaches for responding to and investigating the crimes of violence against women, specifically domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, and strangulation. The training is not only designed to increase understanding of these crimes, but will instill mentoring, training, and leadership skills.

    IACP’s National Law Enforcement Supervisor First-Line Training on Violence Against Women (VAW) is an unprecedented opportunity for individuals who hold primary responsibility for overseeing first-line officers to explore current approaches for responding to and investigating the crimes of violence against women, specifically domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, and strangulation. The training is not only designed to increase understanding of these crimes, but will instill mentoring, training, and leadership skills. 

    Target Audience: Law enforcement first-line supervisors 

    Overall Objectives: As a result of the training, supervisors will be able to: -Illustrate the interconnected nature of VAW crimes -Articulate the importance of leadership and supervision in enhancing officer response to VAW -Identify the role of culture and team climate in shaping attitudes and actions towards VAW -Utilize a range of tools and best practices to strengthen efforts to address these crimes -Explain how partnerships and collaborations can enhance and improve response to VAW crimes 

    Project Funding Provided By: This project is supported by Grant No. 2016-TA-AX-K055 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed here are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. 

    Includes: -Realities of Violence Against Women -Trauma-Informed Lens and Response -Culture and Team Climate -Leadership and Violence Against Women -Predominant Aggressor Determination -Stalking -Victim and Officer Safety -Protection Order Enforcement -Partnerships and Collaboration -Supervisor Impact

    Jesenia Alonso

    Program Manager, IACP

    Jesenia Alonso is a Program Manager at the International Association of Chiefs of Police working on numerous Department of Justice projects that address domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, strangulation and other intimate partner crimes.  Prior to joining the staff at the IACP, Ms. Alonso was the Director of Victim Resources for the National Center for Victims of Crime, overseeing the DC Victim Hotline, a local resource for victims of crime in the District of Colombia and VictimConnect Resource Center, a national resource providing information and referrals to victims of crime via phone, online chat, and text messages. 

    Ms. Alonso has over 10 years of experience working in the victim services field. During her role as the Bilingual Senior Victim Advocate in Fairfax County Domestic and Sexual Violence Services, she provided direct services and education about the civil and criminal justice system, and resources to victims of domestic and sexual violence and stalking. She used her extensive knowledge of the civil and criminal justice system to provide trainings to victim advocates, law enforcement, court personnel, and other professionals in the field. Ms. Alonso collaborated with law enforcement from different jurisdictions, providing trainings to new recruits at the police academy on topics related to domestic violence, protective orders, and other civil matters from a trauma informed and victim-centered perspective. 

    Ms. Alonso has a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Marymount University and a master’s degree in Social Work from Virginia Commonwealth University. Ms. Alonso was awarded the 2015 Fairfax County Domestic Violence Network Service Provider Award of Excellence. She was also featured on an NBC segment, “How to Get a Protective Order in Fairfax County” where she discussed the significance of collaborative efforts of the court system, law enforcement, and community-based organizations when helping victims navigate the criminal and civil justice systems. Ms. Alonso is a licensed clinical social worker, certified as a clinical trauma specialist.

    Rachel Apfelbaum

    Project Manager, IACP

    Rachel Apfelbaum is a project manager for a portfolio of projects at the IACP that aim to enhance law enforcement’s response to violence against women crimes. Prior to this position, she was a project coordinator for the IACP’s Trauma Informed Sexual Assault Investigation Training Initiative. Ms. Apfelbaum started her career at the IACP as a project assistant for the National Law Enforcement Leadership Institute on Violence Against Women. Ms. Apfelbaum has prior experience working with the victims of domestic violence in multiple roles. She interned with the Alexandria Domestic Violence Program (VA) as a court advocate where she assisted victims filing for protective orders and acted as a mediator between victims and the court system. Additionally, she acted as a shelter supervisor at the Domestic Violence Program, where she assisted in meeting the needs of victims and answered the 24-hour domestic violence hotline. In 2012, Ms. Apfelbaum interned with the Batterer’s Intervention Program in Harrisonburg, VA where she worked with perpetrators of domestic violence and victims by assisting with facilitation of group discussions and classes. She received her B.A. in Psychology from James Madison University, and her M.A. in Global Women’s Studies from the National University of Ireland, Galway.

    Steve Bellshaw

    Deputy Chief, Salem, Oregon, Police Department

    Steve Bellshaw has worked for the Salem Police Department since 1989. He has supervised Salem Police Department’s Criminal Investigation Division since 2007. The Investigation Division includes detectives, drug investigations, crime prevention, gangs, youth services, volunteers, domestic violence victim advocates, and the crime lab. Deputy Chief Bellshaw’s assignments have included: patrol officer and detective - working sex crimes and homicides. He was promoted to sergeant in 1998 and served as the Youth Services Supervisor, was the founding Sergeant of the CEASE Team, working drug house complaints and livability issues, and has served as the Internal Affairs Sergeant. Deputy Chief Bellshaw was promoted to Lieutenant in 2004 and served as a Patrol Shift Commander and the supervisor of the Drug Activity Response Team, Street Crimes Unit, and the Crime Prevention Unit. He has also served on the Marion County Domestic Violence Council, Child Abuse Review Team and the Marion County Sexual Assault Response Team. Currently, Deputy Chief Bellshaw serves on the Oregon Attorney General’s Sexual Assault Task Force, the Oregon Violence Against Women Act Advisory Board, and the Marion County Threat Management Team. He is an instructor with the Sexual Assault Training Institute, traveling around the country teaching on investigating sexual assault cases.

    Erin Greenawald

    Attorney, Geenawald Law

    Ms. Greenawald owns her own law practice in Portland, Oregon. She focuses on developing and delivering high-quality trainings, curriculum, and Best Practices for criminal and civil legal systems partners around Domestic, Family, and Sexual Violence issues, including trauma-informed policies and processes. Additionally, her practice includes representing victims of violence in protective order hearings, violation of constitutional and statutory rights proceedings, and other select civil-legal matters. Until July 2018, Ms. Greenawald was a Senior Assistant Attorney General for the Oregon Department of Justice (DOJ). From 2010 to 2018, she served as DOJ’s first Domestic Violence Resource Prosecutor (DVRP). As the state’s DVRP, she provided resources and training specific to Domestic and Sexual Violence issues to law enforcement, prosecutors, advocates, and community organizations, including opportunities to improve trauma-informed investigation and prosecution techniques in Oregon. In addition to creating, hosting, and facilitating trainings and conferences around the state, as DVRP, she continued to handle complex Domestic and Sexual Violence cases while also working on legislative and policy matters related to those same issues. Before joining the Department of Justice, Ms. Greenawald worked as a Deputy District Attorney in Yamhill and Marion counties. From 1999-2018, she prosecuted domestic violence and major person felonies, including child and adult sex abuse crimes and homicides. She has also served on a number of statewide Domestic and Sexual Violence–related work groups, including the Governor’s Domestic Violence Prevention and Response Task Force, the Oregon Sexual Assault Task Force (SATF), and Oregon’s Domestic Violence Fatality Review Team of which she was chair and co-chair for seven years. Ms. Greenawald is also an instructor with SATF’s Sexual Assault Training Institute as well as the You Have Options Program.

    Denise Jones

    Sergeant, Clark County, Ohio, Sheriff's Office

    Sergeant Jones has been in law enforcement for over 18 years. She came to the Clark County Sheriff’s Office in March of 2007. She began her career in law enforcement in January of 2000 with the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office. Sergeant Jones has served in multiple divisions including corrections, court services, and road patrol. She was promoted in June of 2015 serving as a supervisor in both the Jail and Road Patrol divisions and now the Professional Standards Division. She works primarily with intimate partner crime such as stalking, domestic violence, strangulation, and protection order violations along with conducting internal investigations, training, and orientation. Sergeant Jones has been engaged in changing her department’s culture, the department’s response to intimate partner crime, and establishing new policy and procedures with regards to issues within the minority populations of the community and intimate partner crime. Sergeant Denise Jones served in the Ohio Army National Guard for six years after graduating from high school. She has continued her education throughout her tenure at the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, graduating with her Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice Administration along with her Master of Science degree in Criminal Justice Administration and Master of Science degree in Emergency Services Management, and is working on a Bachelor of Science degree in Homeland Security from Columbia Southern University.

    Alissa Kiefer

    Intern, IACP

    Alissa Kiefer is an intern at the IACP and is involved in a variety of projects within the organization. She is primarily working on projects related to violence against women crimes, such as intimate partner violence and sexual assault. Ms. Kiefer is also assisting the IACP with a literature review focused on identifying and combating extremism in law enforcement agencies. Before obtaining her current position at the IACP, she interned with the Major Cities Chiefs Association (MCCA) in Washington, D.C., an IACP partner and professional organization of 78 metropolitan police departments in the U.S. and Canada. She has also interned with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Georgia in Savannah, GA. 

    Ms. Kiefer graduated from the University of Georgia in December 2020 with two degrees in criminal justice (B.A) and psychology (B.S). She also received two minors in sociology and French. She will be returning to the University of Georgia in August 2021 to attend law school. 

    Libby Lytle

    Captain (Retired), Oxford, Mississippi, Police Department and Adult Advocate, Family Crisis Services of Northwest Mississippi

    Libby Lytle served as a law enforcement officer for 27 years (24 years in Mississippi, 3 years in Florida). She retired at the rank of captain from the Oxford Police Department in 2017. Some of the boards she has served on: International Association of Women Police; Mississippi Women’s Law Enforcement Association; University of Mississippi Alumni Advisory Board; United Way of Oxford/Lafayette County; and Hopewell Water Association. She has taught at the Mississippi Law Enforcement Training Academy, the Lafayette County Part- time Academy, and various law enforcement agencies for several years. Her specialty is domestic violence training for law enforcement. 

    She currently serves as an adjunct professor in Legal Studies at Ole Miss. She is also an adult advocate for victims of crime at Family Crisis Services of Northwest Mississippi, serving 10 counties. She serves as coordinator of the volunteer program, crisis call line, Interpersonal Violence Response Team for Lafayette and Coahoma county. She currently serves on the CCRT as the community partner for both Ole Miss and Coahoma Community College.

    Emily Schnee

    Project Coordinator, IACP

    Emily Schnee is a project coordinator for a portfolio of projects at the IACP that aim to enhance law enforcement’s response to violence against women crimes. Before joining the IACP as staff, in Spring of 2020, she participated in an American University practicum with the IACP to research increasing gender diversity in the police force.

    Ms. Schnee has prior experience in program support, training and relationship building through her varied roles in the non-profit and for-profit sectors. Most recently, prior to this position, she was the Community and Volunteer Relations Coordinator with the Human Rights Campaign focusing on supporting LGBTQ advocacy, fundraising, and outreach work of volunteers, steering committee members and national board members.

    Ms. Schnee received her B.A. in Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She is currently pursuing her M.S. in Justice, Law & Criminology with a focus in Justice & Public Policy from American University and will be graduating May 2021.

    Mark Wynn

    Lieutenant (Retired), Nashville Metropolitan, Tennessee, Police Department

    Mark Wynn is a retired Lieutenant and twenty-year member of the Nashville Metropolitan Police Department in Nashville, Tennessee.  During his career in law enforcement, he served as Lieutenant to the Domestic Violence Division and a member of the Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) Team for fifteen years.  He currently runs Wynn Consulting, providing prevention, training, and consulting on the topics of domestic violence and sexual violence.

    Mr. Wynn has been a consultant on the issues of domestic violence and sexual violence for numerous organizations nationally and internationally. He is also a renowned educator, as an adjunct instructor to the University of Houston Law School - National College of District Attorney's conferences on Family Violence; the University of Nevada's National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges on issues of family violence; the University of Tennessee's Law Enforcement Satellite Tele-conference Network; the Metropolitan Police Academy and the Tennessee Law Enforcement Academy on the issues of family violence. He is an international lecturer at police academies in Australia, Germany, England, Northern Ireland, Russia, the Republic of Mauritius, the Republic of Georgia, the Federated States of Micronesia, and China.

    Mr. Wynn serves as a board member to the American Bar Association's Commission on Domestic Violence as well as a Nashville-based batterers program, the Project to End Abuse through Counseling Education. He is also a member of the Nashville Coalition Against Domestic Violence and the Domestic Violence State Coordinating Council. Additionally, he is a former member of the National Advisory Board of the Department of Justice's Office for Victims of Crime on Law Enforcement Response to Family Violence.

  • Digital Family Engagement Strategies

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Officer family engagement and support is not limited to in-person activities or annual events. Join Kimberly Jackson-Luzader, Coordinator for Raleigh, NC Police Department’s “Families Behind the Badge,” and the IACP for a webinar on strategies to digitally engage family members. Using free online resources and digital platforms, agencies can offer valuable wellness tools and support that best meets the needs of their officer families. Participants will learn about creating digital newsletters, shaping their agency family wellness brand, leveraging free design programs, and hosting virtual events.

    Officer family engagement and support is not limited to in-person activities or annual events. Join Kimberly Jackson-Luzader, Coordinator for Raleigh, NC Police Department’s “Families Behind the Badge,” and the IACP for a webinar on strategies to digitally engage family members. Using free online resources and digital platforms, agencies can offer valuable wellness tools and support that best meets the needs of their officer families. Participants will learn about creating digital newsletters, shaping their agency family wellness brand, leveraging free design programs, and hosting virtual events.

    Target Audience: Law enforcement families and law enforcement officers 

    Objectives: 1. Leverage free online resources to effectively engage officers and their families. 2. Understand the opportunities and formats of online engagement. 

    Project Funding Provided By: Motorola Solutions Foundation The Law Enforcement Family Support Group Program Training and Technical Assistance Program

    Includes: A webinar featuring Raleigh Police Department's "Families Behind the Badge" coordinator Kimberly Jackson-Luzader, discussing strategies to digitally engage law enforcement family members. 

    Kimberly Jackson-Luzader

    Trauma Counselor, Coordinator for Families Behind the Badge

  • Drug/Alcohol-Facilitated Sexual Assault (DFSB) Webinar

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar, “Drug and Alcohol-Facilitated Sexual Assault (DFSB)”, will address the complexities of sexual assault cases facilitated by drugs and/or alcohol. Alcohol and/or drugs are a frequent component of sexual assault cases because of how they can be used by the perpetrator to increase victim’s the vulnerability, accessibility, and perceived lack of credibility. A traumatic experience like sexual assault affects how memories are encoded and stored. Adding incapacitating substances like alcohol and drugs on top of this can further impact a victim’s memory. Therefore, it is important for law enforcement and others in the criminal justice system to understand the impacts of alcohol and drugs on victims as well as the tactics perpetrators use to commit sexual assault; combined with trauma-informed and perpetrator-focused investigative strategies in these cases, investigators can thoroughly examine the context and present an accurate case. This webinar will provide investigative strategies that better support victims as they recall details of the assault and that obtain more evidence to better hold perpetrators accountable.

    This webinar, “Drug and Alcohol-Facilitated Sexual Assault (DFSB)”, will address the complexities of sexual assault cases facilitated by drugs and/or alcohol. Alcohol and/or drugs are a frequent component of sexual assault cases because of how they can be used by the perpetrator to increase victim’s the vulnerability, accessibility, and perceived lack of credibility. A traumatic experience like sexual assault affects how memories are encoded and stored. Adding incapacitating substances like alcohol and drugs on top of this can further impact a victim’s memory. Therefore, it is important for law enforcement and others in the criminal justice system to understand the impacts of alcohol and drugs on victims as well as the tactics perpetrators use to commit sexual assault; combined with trauma-informed and perpetrator-focused investigative strategies in these cases, investigators can thoroughly examine the context and present an accurate case. This webinar will provide investigative strategies that better support victims as they recall details of the assault and that obtain more evidence to better hold perpetrators accountable. 

    Target Audience: Law Enforcement 

    Objectives: • Describe how perpetrators use alcohol and drugs as a weapon to facilitate committing sexual assaults by increasing victim vulnerability and decreasing credibility • Explain common perpetrator defense strategies • Identify strategies for trauma-informed investigation of alcohol and drug-facilitated sexual assault cases 

    Project Funding Provided By: Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women 

    This project was supported by Grant No. 2017-TA-AX-K053 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. 

    Includes: • The components of perpetrators' modus operandi • How perpetrators use drugs and/or alcohol to facilitate committing sexual assaults • The impact of alcohol on memory • The implications for interviewing the victim • The common perpetrator defense strategies • Offender-focused investigation strategies to bolster the evidence of assault

    Rob Fanelli

    Lieutenant, Gainesville, Florida, Police Department

    Lieutenant Rob Fanelli is from Gainesville Police Department. He is currently the Criminal Investigations Division Commander and oversees robbery/homicide, sexual assault, ICAC, domestic violence, and the forensic unit. He has had a diverse career and has experience in a number of different areas including policy writing and compliance, investigations, street crime units, and administration. From 2007-2009 he wrote or updated 153 department policies, and subsequently, the Gainesville Police Department was awarded 100% approval for accreditation through the Florida Law Enforcement Accreditation.

  • The Impact of Trauma: A Trauma-Informed Lens and Response Webinar

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar, “The Impact of Trauma: A Trauma-Informed Lens and Response”, discusses how traumatic experiences can impact victim memory, reactions and behavior, and the implications of this for first responders’ and investigators’ interviews and investigations. While this webinar focuses on the impact of trauma as it relates to the investigation of sexual assault cases, the information is relevant for any incident where a traumatic event has occurred such as a car accident or burglary.

    This webinar, “The Impact of Trauma: A Trauma-Informed Lens and Response”, discusses how traumatic experiences can impact victim memory, reactions and behavior, and the implications of this for first responders’ and investigators’ interviews and investigations. While this webinar focuses on the impact of trauma as it relates to the investigation of sexual assault cases, the information is relevant for any incident where a traumatic event has occurred such as a car accident or burglary. The presenter for this webinar is Corporal Angela Weekes (retired) from Nampa Police Department. She recently retired after over twenty-six years at the department. Her most recent position was as a Corporal in the Crimes Against Person’s Unit in the investigations division. 

    Target Audience: Law Enforcement 

    Objectives: • Explain that people react differently to trauma and no one reaction is “normal.” • Describe how the neurobiology of trauma impacts memory, reactions, and behavior. • Apply their understanding of trauma to conduct interviews that obtain additional information and evidence. • Observe, explain, and document signs of trauma as evidence. 

    Project Funding Provided By: Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women 

    This project was supported by Grant No. 2017-TA-AX-K053 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. 

    Includes: • Trauma defined • How the body responds during a traumatic event - Freeze, Flight, Fight • How trauma impacts victim behavior • How trauma impacts victim memory • The tenets of trauma-informed interviews • The importance of addressing vicarious trauma that first responders are exposed to

    Angela Weekes

    Corporal (Retired), Nampa, Illinois, Police Department

    Corporal Angela Weekes (retired) from Nampa Police Department. She recently retired after over twenty-six years at the department. Her most recent position was as a Corporal in the Crimes Against Person’s Unit in the investigations division. Corporal Weekes is an active member of the Canyon County Multidisciplinary Team of Child Abuse, the Canyon County SART and the Canyon County Child Death Review team. Corporal Weekes is also the visionary component of the Nampa Family Justice Center. Nampa was recognized for their efforts in this field by their selection as a model site to develop Family Justice Centers.

  • The COVID-19 Vaccine and Law Enforcement: A Discussion with Dr. Anthony Fauci

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A virtual discussion with Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and a panel of esteemed police leaders on the COVID-19 vaccine and operational issues associated with the COVID-19 vaccine distribution.

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    Summary: A virtual discussion with Dr. Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, and a panel of esteemed police leaders on the COVID-19 vaccine and operational issues associated with the COVID-19 vaccine distribution.

    Target Audience: Law enforcement professionals  

    Overall Objective: To provide information on COVID-19, the COVID-19 vaccine, and its related challenges to the policing profession. 

    Includes: A webinar featuring Dr. Anthony Fauci; IACP President Cynthia Renaud; Colonel Matt Langer, Minnesota State Patrol; Chief Michel R. Moore, Los Angeles, California, Police Department; and Jack Collins, Police Legal Advisor, discussing operational issues associated with the COVID-19 vaccine distribution. 

    This is a recording of a live, members-only webinar that is now available for free to all police professionals. Join the IACP today to participate in future live events. 

    Membership in the IACP will give you access to resources, programs, and training that will help provide support for your community engagement efforts and further develop your career. JOIN NOW!

    The International Association of Chiefs of Police is a professional association for law enforcement worldwide, representing 31,000 members in 160 countries. Membership in the IACP is open to all law enforcement and those affiliated with the law enforcement profession, including police leaders, officers ranging from recruit to command-level, law enforcement executives, nonsworn law enforcement personnel, criminal justice academics and students, and more.

  • Emerging Technologies with Vehicle Crimes

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In this webinar, presenters outline the impact of technology on vehicle crime trends. Panelists provide an overview of vehicle crime trends, highlight information on vehicle manufacturer efforts to deter vehicle crimes, and discuss the impact emerging technology has on criminal intelligence, research, and investigations.

    In this webinar, presenters outline the impact of technology on vehicle crime trends. Panelists provide an overview of vehicle crime trends, highlight information on vehicle manufacturer efforts to deter vehicle crimes, and discuss the impact emerging technology has on criminal intelligence, research, and investigations.

    Target Audience: Law Enforcement Personnel 

    Overall Objective: To explain emerging technology’s impact on vehicle crime trends. 

    Includes: A webinar outlining the impact of technology on vehicle crime trends and information on the Educational Toolkit for Vehicle Crimes.

    John Letteney (Moderator)

    Chief, Thomasville, Georgia, Police Department

    John Letteney was sworn in as Chief of Police for the Thomasville (GA) Police Department in January 2021. He previously served as Chief of Police for the Apex (NC) Police Department (2012 - 2021) and the Southern Pines (NC) Police Department (2005 - 2012). In 2005, Chief Letteney retired as a Captain/Zone Commander from the Monroe County Sheriff’s Office in Rochester, New York, where he was responsible for a police substation as well as law enforcement services for an international airport. During his 39+ year law enforcement career, he has served in patrol, investigations, training, accreditation, tactical operations, inspections and administration. Chief Letteney currently serves as the 2nd Vice President of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), and is a Past General Chair for the Division of State Associations of Chiefs of Police (SACOP). Chief Letteney has represented the IACP throughout the membership. He served as a Mentor for the IACP’s New Police Chief Mentoring Project, and is a past member of the IACP Civilian Law Enforcement/Military Cooperation Committee (CLEMCC), the Sergeant-At-Arms Committee and the Resolutions Committee. He chairs the IACP Investigations Policy Council. Chief Letteney is a Past President of the North Carolina Association of Chiefs of Police (NCACP), and received their Outstanding Service Award for 2015. He also received the 2013 Outstanding Law Enforcement Executive of the Year award from the North Carolina chapter of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), was honored as the 2017 Chief of the Year and honored with the 2020 “Blue Flame of Hope” Award by Special Olympics of North Carolina, and was named a “Magnus Gladio Leader” by the National Command and Staff College in 2018. In 2020 he was appointed to the Respect for Law Enforcement and the Rule of Law Working Group of the Presidents Commission on the Administration of Justice, and was appointed by the Governor of North Carolina to both the Governor's Crime Commission and the Governor's Task Force on Racial Equity in Criminal Justice. Chief Letteney holds an Advanced Law Enforcement Certificate in North Carolina, has a Master’s Degree in Public Administration, and is a graduate of the FBI Command College and the 248th Session of the FBI National Academy.

    Chris McDonold

    Executive Director, Maryland Vehicle Theft Prevention Council

    Christopher McDonold is the Executive Director for the Maryland Vehicle Theft Prevention Council/Department of State Police. After serving 25 years, he retired on June 30th, 2012 from the Baltimore County Police Department. He had been assigned to the Patrol Division, the Burglary Investigation Unit, the Firearms Violence Section and for his last 17 years was assigned to the Baltimore Regional Auto Theft Team. Chris is the committee chair of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) Vehicle Crimes Committee and has been a member of the International Association of Auto Theft Investigators (IAATI) since 1995, serving as its president from 2010-2011. Chris is also the current chair of the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) NMVTIS Law Enforcement Sub-Committee. Chris is a veteran of the United States Marine Corps and the United States Air Force Reserve and holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Business from Mount St. Mary’s University and a Master of Science in Organizational Leadership from Johns Hopkins University’s Police Executive Leadership Program.

    Paul Steier

    Law Enforcement Program Managers, American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators

    Paul Steier is the Law Enforcement Program Manager with the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA). Paul coordinates training and educational programs to inspire collaboration between motor vehicle and law enforcement agencies through-out the U.S. and Canada. Paul joined AAMVA in 2017 and previously served 25-years as a commissioned officer with the Iowa Department of Transportation (DOT) where he was the Director of the Bureau of Investigation & Identity Protection. He managed a staff who investigated motor vehicle and personal identity crimes along with operating the DOT's facial recognition program. Prior to his service as Bureau Director, Paul held the rank of Major working for the DOT's Motor Vehicle Enforcement Office where he also served as a Fraud Investigator and Commercial Vehicle Enforcement Officer. Paul is a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police serving on the Vehicle Crimes Committee and is Chair of the Emerging Technologies with Vehicle Crimes Working Group. Paul is a member of the National Sheriff's Association serving on the Traffic Safety Committee.  He also is a member of the International Association of Financial Crimes Investigators, International Association of Auto Theft Investigators, and the Iowa Peace Officers Association. Paul has a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Criminal Justice Administration from Mount Mercy University in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Paul is a graduate of the Iowa Law Enforcement Academy and served on the FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force.    

    George Baker

    Global Vehicle Security Lead, General Motors Global Technical Center

    George Baker serves as GM’s primary interface to the international vehicle crime investigation community. He leads GM’s Global Vehicle Security Team, working with GM’s technical experts to ensure GM understands and counters current and emerging vehicle crime methods to provide optimal vehicle security to GM product owners. George has held a variety of positions at General Motors since 1995, including locomotive program manager in Mexico and Russia, sales/marketing/aftersales director in Moscow, director of GM Military Trucks, and OnStar’s primary liaison to law enforcement. He holds an engineering degree from West Point and a master’s degree in Russian area studies from Harvard University. George is a retired US Army officer following his service on tanks and in the Army’s military liaison program.

    Darrell Russell

    Director of Operations-Vehicles, the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB)

    D.T. “Rusty” Russell is the Director of Operations-Vehicles with the National Insurance Crime Bureau (NICB).  In his role Mr. Russell coordinates all vehicle, marine, and specialized equipment investigative programs of the NICB (both nationally and internationally) at the headquarters level. He has been with NICB since 2009 and previously served as an NICB Special Agent in Western North Carolina. As Director of Operations-Vehicles he has been instrumental in the development of NICB’s LPR Program, Specialized Equipment Program, Berla Program, and the Crash Data Retrieval Program. Mr. Russell has advanced NICB relationships with manufacturing partners and strengthened strategic partnerships with organizations such as the National Automobile Services Task Force, Automotive Information Sharing & Analysis Center, and the Automotive Anti-Counterfeiting Coalition.  

    Paul Burnley

    Electronics Engineer and Technology Consultant, Adrow Ltd.

    Paul is an electronics engineer and technology consultant with more than 25 years’ experience in global engineering and consultancy roles. Most of his experience has been gained working within the Automotive industry. He currently owns and runs an engineering consultancy company based in the UK called Adrow Ltd.

    Paul holds a master’s degree in Electrical & Electronic Engineering from the University of Surrey. He subsequently held Senior Engineer roles in Automotive Tier-1 companies, such as Alps and Motorola, where he was responsible for the development, testing and production launch of a wide range of Electronic Control Units (ECUs) used in contemporary vehicles. 

    Paul then moved into engineering consultancy and has spent the last 14 years working with vehicle manufacturers, security system suppliers and other stakeholders to help them understand the latest theft techniques and advise them how to design-out some of the weaknesses exploited by contemporary vehicle theft tools. As part of his consultancy role he presents at national and international conferences, runs confidential technical workshops and seminars with clients and produces numerous reports and articles on contemporary theft methods. Paul is listed on the UK National Crime Agency’s (NCA) ‘Expert Advisor’ database and assists law enforcement by identifying, testing, and providing evidential statements on recovered tools.

    Adrow Ltd specialises in separating fact from fiction regarding vehicle theft for our clients in Asia, Europe, and North America. The work we do is strictly confidential. We cooperate with a trusted network of law enforcement and theft investigators to share intelligence with our clients, enabling the development of enhanced security systems to meet the evolving threat environment.

  • Achieving Justice in Labor Trafficking Cases in the U.S.

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar is designed to provide an overview of considerations for police and prosecutors when analyzing culpability and making charging decisions in labor trafficking cases. To learn more about IACP’s anti-human trafficking resources, go to https://www.theiacp.org/projects/anti-human-trafficking-training-and-technical-assistance​.

    This webinar is designed to provide an overview of considerations for police and prosecutors when analyzing culpability and making charging decisions in labor trafficking cases. 

    Target Audience: Police, prosecutors, and allied professionals  

    Overall Objective: To support participants with strategies to make charging decisions that appropriately address the offender’s criminal culpability; develop offender-focused trial strategies; recreate the reality of the crime by utilizing trauma-informed practices at trial; and leverage all avenues to justice, within and beyond the criminal justice system. 

    Project Funding Provided By: The U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime

    Includes: A webinar featuring subject matter experts discussing strategies to help police and prosecutors to proactively identify victims of labor trafficking and effectively investigate and prosecute traffickers using a victim-centered and trauma-informed approach.

    To learn more about IACP’s anti-human trafficking resources, go to https://www.theiacp.org/projects/anti-human-trafficking-training-and-technical-assistance.

    Jane Anderson, JD

    Attorney Advisor, AEquitas: The Prosecutors’ Resource on Violence Against Women

    Jane Anderson joined AEquitas in October 2014 after having served as an Assistant State Attorney in Miami Dade County. As an Attorney Advisor with AEquitas, Jane leverages her experience prosecuting domestic violence, sexual violence, stalking, and human trafficking crimes to provide technical assistance and trainings to prosecutors and allied professionals as well as develop resources, publications, and training curricula. As a prosecutor, Jane tried many of Florida’s first human trafficking cases, including related sexual assault, child abuse, and money laundering crimes. As a founding member of the Miami-Dade State Attorney’s Human Trafficking Unit and Task Force, Jane developed key partnerships and infrastructure that improved victim identification and safety, while ensuring that offenders were held accountable. Jane particularly focused on building stronger prosecutions through the use of cyber investigations, digital evidence, and racketeering (RICO) statutes. In December 2013, Jane successfully prosecuted a trafficking case where the victim did not testify at trial. Jane held several supervisory positions where she oversaw the prosecutions of domestic violence, stalking, human trafficking, and other felony level crimes. Prior to focusing on Human Trafficking prosecutions, Jane served as the Chief of Litigation for the Misdemeanor Domestic Violence Unit – the same unit where she started her legal career. While a supervisor, she trained and supervised new lawyers in the complexities of intimate partner violence and prosecutions, including best practices for victim interviewing, pretrial litigation, and trial strategies. Jane graduated cum laude with a Juris Doctor from American University, Washington College of Law, after earning a Bachelor of Arts in History from the University of Washington in Seattle. Prior to her legal career, she lived and taught English in Bangkok, Thailand. Jane is currently based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Jane is also a member of the IACP technical assistance (TA) team as a consultant and Task Force Liaison for six ECM task forces.

    Amy Fleischauer

    Director of Support Services, International Institute of Buffalo, Western District of New York Human Trafficking Task Force

    Amy Fleischauer, LMSW, is the Director of Survivor Support Services at the International Institute of Buffalo (IIB) and supervises a team of case managers and advocates working with nearly 500 survivors of human trafficking and domestic violence annually. Ms. Fleischauer serves as the co-facilitator of the Western District of New York’s Anti-Trafficking Task Force, a position she has held since its inception in 2007. In addition, Ms. Fleischauer serves as a project consultant for the U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants (USCRI) Trafficking Victim Assistance Program, providing training and technical assistance for organizations administering direct care to foreign-born survivors of human trafficking across the country. Ms. Fleischauer has represented the immigrant victim services perspective on the New York State Domestic Violence Fatality Review Team, a position she was appointed to by Governor Cuomo in 2012. She also testifies as an expert witness on domestic violence-related trauma for state-level criminal cases. Ms. Fleischauer was appointed by Governor Cuomo as an inaugural member of the New York State Domestic Violence Fatality Review Team in 2012 and testifies as an expert witness on domestic violence-related trauma for state-level criminal cases. She was appointed to the New York State Office of Victim Services Advisory Counsel in 2017. She serves on the board of Freedom Network USA and is an active member of the New York Anti-Trafficking Network. Ms. Fleischauer has a master’s degree in social work from Columbia University and a certificate in Trauma Counseling from the University of Buffalo. She has specific expertise in program planning, multidisciplinary collaborative teams, and provides training to national audiences on the implementation of trauma-informed care within victim services programs.

    Megan Zentner

    Detective, Seattle Police Department, Washington Advisory Committee on Trafficking (WashACT) 

    Detective Megan Bruneau Zentner has been with the Seattle Police Department (SPD) for 20 years and is currently assigned to the Criminal Intelligence Unit.  Megan has been assigned as SPD’s grant-funded Human Trafficking Detective for over 10 years and is a Task Force Officer with Homeland Security Investigations (Seattle office).  She is dedicated to a victim-centered, trauma-informed approach to human trafficking cases and works to bring creativity and diligence to all investigations. This has allowed her to develop excellent relationships with fellow investigators, prosecutors, immigration attorneys and NGO service providers. Megan has provided professional training on human trafficking investigations to law enforcement agencies locally, nationally, and internationally at the request of the Department of Justice, Homeland Security, and other agencies. As a patrol officer Megan worked at the West Precinct in downtown Seattle and was assigned to the VICE/High Risk Victims Unit for over 8 years.  Megan assisted the Street VICE Squad, Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) Unit, multiple precinct Anti-Crime Team (ACT) Units, and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) on various operations. Prior to becoming a sworn police officer in 2006, Megan spent her first five years with SPD as a civilian employee with the Victim Support Team (VST), an on-scene crisis intervention advocacy program for domestic violence victims and their children. After starting as a volunteer and working in the office through the AmeriCorps program, Megan became the VST Supervisor from 2003 to 2005. Megan is a graduate of the University of Washington.

    Theresa Nietzel

    Detective, Erie County Sheriff’s Office, Western District of New York Human Trafficking Task Force 

    Detective Theresa Nietzel is assigned to the Narcotics & Intelligence Division within the Human Trafficking Unit for the Erie County Sheriff’s Office and also serves as the Program Director for the Western District of New York’s Human Trafficking Task Force & Alliance. Theresa has been working in law enforcement for 16 years, serving as a lead investigator of Human Trafficking investigations. Theresa Nietzel began her police officer career with the Town of Newburgh Police Department before becoming a Deputy Sheriff with the Erie County Sheriff’s Office in 2010.  

    In 2019, Theresa was awarded the HSI Executive Director Award for Outstanding Efforts to Combat Human Trafficking as a Task Force Officer. In 2017, Theresa was awarded the Women in Federal Law Enforcement Partnership Award for her Outstanding Contribution as a State or Local Officer while serving as a Task Force Officer with Homeland Security Investigations on human trafficking investigations. After earning her Master’s Degree in Public Administration, she joined Medaille College as an adjunct professor. Theresa has also served in the United States Army Reserves as a Military Police Officer for 13 years.  

    Nicholas Odenath  

    Sergeant, Ventura County (CA) Sheriff’s Office, Ventura County Human Trafficking Task Force  

    Sergeant Nick Odenath has been with the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office for the past 19 years, including six years as a detective investigating human trafficking. Nick has also served in several other capacities with the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office, including custody and patrol services, court services, narcotics investigations, asset forfeiture, financial investigations, and 6 years as a SWAT operator. Nick has become recognized for his lead on two large-scale human trafficking investigations that resulted in successful human trafficking prosecutions and used organized criminal investigative techniques that were victim-centric and specifically focused on mitigating a victim’s need to testify against their traffickers. He has performed case debriefs and trainings on the topic of human trafficking throughout the United States. Nick has also spoken on several panels addressing victim services and investigative techniques related to human trafficking cases.  

    In March 2020, Nick was promoted to Sergeant and currently works as a Watch Commander at the Ventura County Pre-Trial Detention Facility. Nick continues to provide human trafficking training and case consults for various local, state and federal agencies; serves on the Ventura County Human Trafficking Tack Force committee for outreach and training; and works with community providers focused on combatting human trafficking within Ventura County. Nick also serves as the President for the Ventura County Deputy Sheriff’s Association.  

    Jessie Plamp (Moderator)

    Project Coordinator, IACP

    Jessie Plamp is a member of the IACP Programs Team where she currently works as the Project Coordinator on the Enhancing Law Enforcement Human Trafficking Task Force Operations Program to support the needs of ECM task forces through training and curriculum development. She previously worked as the Project Assistant on the BJA Enhanced Collaborative Model (ECM) Human Trafficking Task Force Training and Technical Assistance (TTA) Program to support the needs of the local ECM task forces.  

    Before joining the IACP Jessie worked as an Assistant Supervisor at Eye2Eye Optometry Office, overseeing staff and responding to the medical needs of patients. Jessie earned her Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience from Michigan State University and Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology from George Washington University. During her Master’s Program she was an intern at The National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START), where she developed curriculum modules, using Power Point and Google Slides, on the profile of cybercriminals.  

    Brittany DuChaussee

    Assistant Attorney General, Office of the Attorney General 

    Brittany DuChaussee is the Deputy Director of Special Prosecutions at the New Mexico Office of the Attorney General. In this position, DuChaussee prosecutes crimes against children including physical and sexual abuse, labor trafficking, sex trafficking and internet crimes against children. In 2019, she secured the first labor trafficking conviction in New Mexico since the adoption of a human trafficking statute in 2008. In 2018, DuChaussee received the Justice Pamela B. Minzer Outstanding Advocacy for Women Award for her work prosecuting cases which protect the most vulnerable populations in our community. Since 2014, DuChaussee has spent her career concentrating on violent crimes against women and children both at the Office of the Attorney General and at the Second Judicial District Attorney’s Office in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

     Joseph Scaramucci 

    Detective, McLennan County Sheriff’s Office, Heart of Texas Human Trafficking Coalition

    Detective Scaramucci began his career in law enforcement in 2004 and was promoted to Detective in 2008 with the McLennan County Sheriff’s Office, investigating Crimes Against Persons.  Since initiating investigations in Human Trafficking in 2014, Detective Scaramucci has participated in John Suppression events, arresting over 450 sex buyers. Since 2015 he has conducted sting operations resulting in the arrest of approximately 135 individuals for Human Trafficking and related offenses, which lead to the identification of approximately 250 trafficking victims. Detective Scaramucci has worked both State and Federal investigation as a Task Force Officer with H.S.I., which has led to investigations and arrests throughout the U.S. and Canada. He has also lead and trained numerous agencies throughout the U.S. on how to conduct these operations, along with operations targeting Illicit Massage Parlors. Detective Scaramucci is certified in Courts of Law as a Subject Matter Expert in Human Trafficking. He is further employed as a consultant for the Polaris Project, and Collective Liberty, training more than 278 agencies throughout the 29 states, 11 federal agencies, branches of the U.S. Military, the Mongolian Federal Police and Prosecutors Offices, along with providing technical support for their Human Trafficking Operations and Investigations.

    Kate Crisham  

    Assistant U.S. Attorney, Western District Of Washington, Washington Advisory Committee on Trafficking (WashACT) 

    Kate Crisham is an Assistant United States Attorney in the Terrorism and Violent Crime Unit in the Western District of Washington, where she serves as her office’s Human Trafficking Coordinator and prosecutes a wide variety of violent crimes, including human trafficking, forced labor, and cases involving the sexual exploitation of children and adults. She is also the co-chair of the Washington Advisory Committee on Trafficking (WashACT) and represents the United States Attorney’s Office as a member of the Washington State Task Force Against the Trafficking of Persons. AUSA Crisham has given numerous presentations and trainings on human trafficking to both law enforcement and community organizations. AUSA Crisham was a law clerk to the Honorable Diana E. Murphy of the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit and a litigation associate at a large Chicago law firm before joining the Department of Justice in 2007. She is a graduate of the University of Notre Dame and the Georgetown University Law Center.