Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Categories
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Type
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Virtual Planning, Designing, and Constructing Police Facilities Course - June 2021

    Contains 13 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes Multiple Live Events. The next is on 06/08/2021 at 9:00 AM (EDT)

    Designed for city administrators, law enforcement executives, police planners, and others responsible for administering the construction, modification, or design of new or existing police facilities, this three-week course provides fundamental knowledge that can be used to develop a cost-effective facility that meets both the department's requirements and the community's needs.

    Designed for city administrators, law enforcement executives, police planners, and others responsible for administering the construction, modification, or design of new or existing police facilities, this three-week course provides fundamental knowledge that can be used to develop a cost-effective facility that meets both the department's requirements and the community's needs. 

    At the conclusion of the course, participants should be able to do the following: 

    • Discuss planning considerations for facility construction
    • Plan and budget for a new or redesigned police facility
    • Plan special design features such as security, jails, and communications
    • Apply principles of space allocation and traffic patterns
    • Understand the implications of sustainable (green) design principles for 24/365 essential service buildings
    • Develop effective client-architect relationships
    • Identify life span and maintenance considerations for a facility

  • IACP Women's Leadership Institute: May - July 2021

    Contains 0 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes Multiple Live Events. The next is on 05/26/2021 at 10:00 AM (EDT)

    This nine-week virtual training, consisting of two virtual live events each week, is intended for women leaders and those developing women leaders. This training teaches attendees evidence-informed leadership theories to help them inspire followers, lead groups, and achieve organizational goals.

    The IACP Women’s Leadership Institute (WLI) is a leadership training program for female leaders and those developing female leaders. The curriculum is focused on teaching participants evidence-informed leadership theories to help them inspire followers, lead groups, and achieve organizational goals—all in the context of better understanding the unique challenges women face in the workplace. 

    Spanning nine weeks in duration, this course consists of two virtual live events a week led by IACP-certified instructors, at-home assignments to support learning application efforts, and virtual (and optional) social events to facilitate participant networking throughout the nine weeks.

    Note on Course Participation: In addition to the two live events that will take place per week, participants are expected to do work outside of class on homework assignments and group projects. The estimated time per week spent on activities outside of live events is two to three hours. Further, participants must attend 12 out of 16 live events in order to receive their certificates of completion.

  • IACP First-Line Leadership Virtual Course: May - July 2021

    Contains 0 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes Multiple Live Events. The next is on 05/18/2021 at 10:00 AM (EDT)

    This training is intended for newly promoted and aspiring sworn and civilian first-line supervisors. The program provides attendees with a foundational understanding of proven and actionable leadership strategies, concepts, and skills.

    The IACP First-Line Leadership (FLL) program is intended for newly promoted and aspiring sworn and civilian first-line supervisors. The learning experience is focused on three key elements of leadership - leader, follower, and situation. This course is designed to provide attendees with a foundational understanding of proven and actionable leadership strategies, concepts, and skills. 

    Spanning seven weeks in duration, the virtual First-Line Leadership Course consists of bi-weekly virtual live events, led by IACP-certified instructors, and at-home assignments to support learning application. The virtual program will afford many opportunities for peer learning and networking as well.

  • National Law Enforcement First-Line Supervisor Training on Violence Against Women

    Contains 75 Component(s), Includes Credits

    IACP’s National Law Enforcement First-Line Supervisor Training on Violence Against Women is an unprecedented opportunity for individuals who hold primary responsibility for overseeing first-line officers to explore current approaches for responding to and investigating the crimes of violence against women, specifically domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, and strangulation. The training is not only designed to increase understanding of these crimes, but will instill mentoring, training, and leadership skills.

    IACP’s National Law Enforcement Supervisor First-Line Training on Violence Against Women (VAW) is an unprecedented opportunity for individuals who hold primary responsibility for overseeing first-line officers to explore current approaches for responding to and investigating the crimes of violence against women, specifically domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, and strangulation. The training is not only designed to increase understanding of these crimes, but will instill mentoring, training, and leadership skills. 

    Target Audience: Law enforcement first-line supervisors 

    Overall Objectives: As a result of the training, supervisors will be able to: -Illustrate the interconnected nature of VAW crimes -Articulate the importance of leadership and supervision in enhancing officer response to VAW -Identify the role of culture and team climate in shaping attitudes and actions towards VAW -Utilize a range of tools and best practices to strengthen efforts to address these crimes -Explain how partnerships and collaborations can enhance and improve response to VAW crimes 

    Project Funding Provided By: This project is supported by Grant No. 2016-TA-AX-K055 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed here are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. 

    Includes: -Realities of Violence Against Women -Trauma-Informed Lens and Response -Culture and Team Climate -Leadership and Violence Against Women -Predominant Aggressor Determination -Stalking -Victim and Officer Safety -Protection Order Enforcement -Partnerships and Collaboration -Supervisor Impact

    Jesenia Alonso

    Program Manager, IACP

    Jesenia Alonso is a Program Manager at the International Association of Chiefs of Police working on numerous Department of Justice projects that address domestic violence, sexual assault, stalking, strangulation and other intimate partner crimes.  Prior to joining the staff at the IACP, Ms. Alonso was the Director of Victim Resources for the National Center for Victims of Crime, overseeing the DC Victim Hotline, a local resource for victims of crime in the District of Colombia and VictimConnect Resource Center, a national resource providing information and referrals to victims of crime via phone, online chat, and text messages. 

    Ms. Alonso has over 10 years of experience working in the victim services field. During her role as the Bilingual Senior Victim Advocate in Fairfax County Domestic and Sexual Violence Services, she provided direct services and education about the civil and criminal justice system, and resources to victims of domestic and sexual violence and stalking. She used her extensive knowledge of the civil and criminal justice system to provide trainings to victim advocates, law enforcement, court personnel, and other professionals in the field. Ms. Alonso collaborated with law enforcement from different jurisdictions, providing trainings to new recruits at the police academy on topics related to domestic violence, protective orders, and other civil matters from a trauma informed and victim-centered perspective. 

    Ms. Alonso has a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Marymount University and a master’s degree in Social Work from Virginia Commonwealth University. Ms. Alonso was awarded the 2015 Fairfax County Domestic Violence Network Service Provider Award of Excellence. She was also featured on an NBC segment, “How to Get a Protective Order in Fairfax County” where she discussed the significance of collaborative efforts of the court system, law enforcement, and community-based organizations when helping victims navigate the criminal and civil justice systems. Ms. Alonso is a licensed clinical social worker, certified as a clinical trauma specialist.

    Rachel Apfelbaum

    Project Manager, IACP

    Rachel Apfelbaum is a project manager for a portfolio of projects at the IACP that aim to enhance law enforcement’s response to violence against women crimes. Prior to this position, she was a project coordinator for the IACP’s Trauma Informed Sexual Assault Investigation Training Initiative. Ms. Apfelbaum started her career at the IACP as a project assistant for the National Law Enforcement Leadership Institute on Violence Against Women. Ms. Apfelbaum has prior experience working with the victims of domestic violence in multiple roles. She interned with the Alexandria Domestic Violence Program (VA) as a court advocate where she assisted victims filing for protective orders and acted as a mediator between victims and the court system. Additionally, she acted as a shelter supervisor at the Domestic Violence Program, where she assisted in meeting the needs of victims and answered the 24-hour domestic violence hotline. In 2012, Ms. Apfelbaum interned with the Batterer’s Intervention Program in Harrisonburg, VA where she worked with perpetrators of domestic violence and victims by assisting with facilitation of group discussions and classes. She received her B.A. in Psychology from James Madison University, and her M.A. in Global Women’s Studies from the National University of Ireland, Galway.

    Steve Bellshaw

    Deputy Chief, Salem, Oregon, Police Department

    Steve Bellshaw has worked for the Salem Police Department since 1989. He has supervised Salem Police Department’s Criminal Investigation Division since 2007. The Investigation Division includes detectives, drug investigations, crime prevention, gangs, youth services, volunteers, domestic violence victim advocates, and the crime lab. Deputy Chief Bellshaw’s assignments have included: patrol officer and detective - working sex crimes and homicides. He was promoted to sergeant in 1998 and served as the Youth Services Supervisor, was the founding Sergeant of the CEASE Team, working drug house complaints and livability issues, and has served as the Internal Affairs Sergeant. Deputy Chief Bellshaw was promoted to Lieutenant in 2004 and served as a Patrol Shift Commander and the supervisor of the Drug Activity Response Team, Street Crimes Unit, and the Crime Prevention Unit. He has also served on the Marion County Domestic Violence Council, Child Abuse Review Team and the Marion County Sexual Assault Response Team. Currently, Deputy Chief Bellshaw serves on the Oregon Attorney General’s Sexual Assault Task Force, the Oregon Violence Against Women Act Advisory Board, and the Marion County Threat Management Team. He is an instructor with the Sexual Assault Training Institute, traveling around the country teaching on investigating sexual assault cases.

    Erin Greenawald

    Attorney, Geenawald Law

    Ms. Greenawald owns her own law practice in Portland, Oregon. She focuses on developing and delivering high-quality trainings, curriculum, and Best Practices for criminal and civil legal systems partners around Domestic, Family, and Sexual Violence issues, including trauma-informed policies and processes. Additionally, her practice includes representing victims of violence in protective order hearings, violation of constitutional and statutory rights proceedings, and other select civil-legal matters. Until July 2018, Ms. Greenawald was a Senior Assistant Attorney General for the Oregon Department of Justice (DOJ). From 2010 to 2018, she served as DOJ’s first Domestic Violence Resource Prosecutor (DVRP). As the state’s DVRP, she provided resources and training specific to Domestic and Sexual Violence issues to law enforcement, prosecutors, advocates, and community organizations, including opportunities to improve trauma-informed investigation and prosecution techniques in Oregon. In addition to creating, hosting, and facilitating trainings and conferences around the state, as DVRP, she continued to handle complex Domestic and Sexual Violence cases while also working on legislative and policy matters related to those same issues. Before joining the Department of Justice, Ms. Greenawald worked as a Deputy District Attorney in Yamhill and Marion counties. From 1999-2018, she prosecuted domestic violence and major person felonies, including child and adult sex abuse crimes and homicides. She has also served on a number of statewide Domestic and Sexual Violence–related work groups, including the Governor’s Domestic Violence Prevention and Response Task Force, the Oregon Sexual Assault Task Force (SATF), and Oregon’s Domestic Violence Fatality Review Team of which she was chair and co-chair for seven years. Ms. Greenawald is also an instructor with SATF’s Sexual Assault Training Institute as well as the You Have Options Program.

    Denise Jones

    Sergeant, Clark County, Ohio, Sheriff's Office

    Sergeant Jones has been in law enforcement for over 18 years. She came to the Clark County Sheriff’s Office in March of 2007. She began her career in law enforcement in January of 2000 with the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office. Sergeant Jones has served in multiple divisions including corrections, court services, and road patrol. She was promoted in June of 2015 serving as a supervisor in both the Jail and Road Patrol divisions and now the Professional Standards Division. She works primarily with intimate partner crime such as stalking, domestic violence, strangulation, and protection order violations along with conducting internal investigations, training, and orientation. Sergeant Jones has been engaged in changing her department’s culture, the department’s response to intimate partner crime, and establishing new policy and procedures with regards to issues within the minority populations of the community and intimate partner crime. Sergeant Denise Jones served in the Ohio Army National Guard for six years after graduating from high school. She has continued her education throughout her tenure at the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, graduating with her Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice Administration along with her Master of Science degree in Criminal Justice Administration and Master of Science degree in Emergency Services Management, and is working on a Bachelor of Science degree in Homeland Security from Columbia Southern University.

    Alissa Kiefer

    Intern, IACP

    Alissa Kiefer is an intern at the IACP and is involved in a variety of projects within the organization. She is primarily working on projects related to violence against women crimes, such as intimate partner violence and sexual assault. Ms. Kiefer is also assisting the IACP with a literature review focused on identifying and combating extremism in law enforcement agencies. Before obtaining her current position at the IACP, she interned with the Major Cities Chiefs Association (MCCA) in Washington, D.C., an IACP partner and professional organization of 78 metropolitan police departments in the U.S. and Canada. She has also interned with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of Georgia in Savannah, GA. 

    Ms. Kiefer graduated from the University of Georgia in December 2020 with two degrees in criminal justice (B.A) and psychology (B.S). She also received two minors in sociology and French. She will be returning to the University of Georgia in August 2021 to attend law school. 

    Libby Lytle

    Captain (Retired), Oxford, Mississippi, Police Department and Adult Advocate, Family Crisis Services of Northwest Mississippi

    Libby Lytle served as a law enforcement officer for 27 years (24 years in Mississippi, 3 years in Florida). She retired at the rank of captain from the Oxford Police Department in 2017. Some of the boards she has served on: International Association of Women Police; Mississippi Women’s Law Enforcement Association; University of Mississippi Alumni Advisory Board; United Way of Oxford/Lafayette County; and Hopewell Water Association. She has taught at the Mississippi Law Enforcement Training Academy, the Lafayette County Part- time Academy, and various law enforcement agencies for several years. Her specialty is domestic violence training for law enforcement. 

    She currently serves as an adjunct professor in Legal Studies at Ole Miss. She is also an adult advocate for victims of crime at Family Crisis Services of Northwest Mississippi, serving 10 counties. She serves as coordinator of the volunteer program, crisis call line, Interpersonal Violence Response Team for Lafayette and Coahoma county. She currently serves on the CCRT as the community partner for both Ole Miss and Coahoma Community College.

    Emily Schnee

    Project Coordinator, IACP

    Emily Schnee is a project coordinator for a portfolio of projects at the IACP that aim to enhance law enforcement’s response to violence against women crimes. Before joining the IACP as staff, in Spring of 2020, she participated in an American University practicum with the IACP to research increasing gender diversity in the police force.

    Ms. Schnee has prior experience in program support, training and relationship building through her varied roles in the non-profit and for-profit sectors. Most recently, prior to this position, she was the Community and Volunteer Relations Coordinator with the Human Rights Campaign focusing on supporting LGBTQ advocacy, fundraising, and outreach work of volunteers, steering committee members and national board members.

    Ms. Schnee received her B.A. in Women, Gender & Sexuality Studies from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She is currently pursuing her M.S. in Justice, Law & Criminology with a focus in Justice & Public Policy from American University and will be graduating May 2021.

    Mark Wynn

    Lieutenant (Retired), Nashville Metropolitan, Tennessee, Police Department

    Mark Wynn is a retired Lieutenant and twenty-year member of the Nashville Metropolitan Police Department in Nashville, Tennessee.  During his career in law enforcement, he served as Lieutenant to the Domestic Violence Division and a member of the Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) Team for fifteen years.  He currently runs Wynn Consulting, providing prevention, training, and consulting on the topics of domestic violence and sexual violence.

    Mr. Wynn has been a consultant on the issues of domestic violence and sexual violence for numerous organizations nationally and internationally. He is also a renowned educator, as an adjunct instructor to the University of Houston Law School - National College of District Attorney's conferences on Family Violence; the University of Nevada's National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges on issues of family violence; the University of Tennessee's Law Enforcement Satellite Tele-conference Network; the Metropolitan Police Academy and the Tennessee Law Enforcement Academy on the issues of family violence. He is an international lecturer at police academies in Australia, Germany, England, Northern Ireland, Russia, the Republic of Mauritius, the Republic of Georgia, the Federated States of Micronesia, and China.

    Mr. Wynn serves as a board member to the American Bar Association's Commission on Domestic Violence as well as a Nashville-based batterers program, the Project to End Abuse through Counseling Education. He is also a member of the Nashville Coalition Against Domestic Violence and the Domestic Violence State Coordinating Council. Additionally, he is a former member of the National Advisory Board of the Department of Justice's Office for Victims of Crime on Law Enforcement Response to Family Violence.

  • Using ODMAP to Guide Response to the Opioid Epidemic

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP) is a web-based tool developed and supported by the Washington/Baltimore HIDTA to provide real-time suspected overdose surveillance data across jurisdictions to support the critical fight against opioid overdoses. In this webinar, instructors demonstrate the value of ODMAP and describe how two jurisdictions are using this free tool to identify overdose “hot spots” and trends of concern, and develop coordinated public safety, public health, and behavioral health intervention strategies.

    The Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP) is a web-based tool developed and supported by the Washington/Baltimore HIDTA to provide real-time suspected overdose surveillance data across jurisdictions to support the critical fight against opioid overdoses. In this webinar, instructors demonstrate the value of ODMAP and describe how two jurisdictions are using this free tool to identify overdose “hot spots” and trends of concern, and develop coordinated public safety, public health, and behavioral health intervention strategies.

    Target Audience: Law enforcement personnel and public health, behavioral health, and treatment practitioners.

    Overall Objectives: To explain the history and functionality of ODMAP, including how officers can enter data from the field and how agencies can access those data; enumerate the strategic and tactical applications of real-time overdose data from across jurisdictions; and demonstrate ways that law enforcement and their public health partners can use ODMAP to develop local and regional strategies for responding to and addressing opioid use disorder in their communities.

    Project Funding Provided By: The Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice through their Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Program (COSSAP)

    Includes: A webinar in which W/B HIDTA personnel and law enforcement officers demonstrate how ODMAP is used in the field for submitting real-time overdose data, how agencies access and use the data, and how those data can be shared with public health officials to respond to opioid use in their jurisdictions.

  • Social Media Matters: Why Law Enforcement Leaders Should Embrace Strategic Communication Through Social Media

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    From a pandemic to civil unrest to police reform, it’s more important than ever that law enforcement effectively uses the communication tools at their disposal to impact the conversation. Whether we like it or not, social media has become the main source of information for many of those with whom we seek to communicate. In this one-hour seminar Chief Christopher Mannino, with a decade of experience in managing law enforcement public messaging and teaching communication strategies across the country, discusses why it is critical for law enforcement agencies to not only have a presence of social media, but an effective strategy as well, and how effective use of social media can be used by law enforcement leaders to build community trust in their agencies, impact the public conversation on law enforcement topics, and positively impact the culture of their departments. This timely course is brought to you by the Public Information Officer’s Section of the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

    From a pandemic to civil unrest to police reform, it’s more important than ever that law enforcement effectively uses the communication tools at their disposal to impact the conversation. Whether we like it or not, social media has become the main source of information for many of those with whom we seek to communicate. In this one-hour seminar Chief Christopher Mannino, with a decade of experience in managing law enforcement public messaging and teaching communication strategies across the country, discusses why it is critical for law enforcement agencies to not only have a presence of social media, but an effective strategy as well, and how effective use of social media can be used by law enforcement leaders to build community trust in their agencies, impact the public conversation on law enforcement topics, and positively impact the culture of their departments. This timely course is brought to you by the Public Information Officer’s Section of the International Association of Chiefs of Police.

    Target Audience: Chiefs of Police, law enforcement leaders tasked with overseeing the public message, and Public Information Officers

    Overall Objectives: By the end of this course participants will be able to explain the importance of law enforcement agencies having a robust, strategic presence on social media, including impacting public perception on important matters related to law enforcement, building positive relationships between a law enforcement agency and the community and enhancing trust, public safety messaging to reduce crime and increase traffic safety, and positively impacting the internal law enforcement culture.

    Includes: A seminar featuring subject matter experts discussing the importance of law enforcement effectively utilizing communication tools to impact conversations on law enforcement topics and positively impact the culture of their departments. 

  • Digital Family Engagement Strategies

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Officer family engagement and support is not limited to in-person activities or annual events. Join Kimberly Jackson-Luzader, Coordinator for Raleigh, NC Police Department’s “Families Behind the Badge,” and the IACP for a webinar on strategies to digitally engage family members. Using free online resources and digital platforms, agencies can offer valuable wellness tools and support that best meets the needs of their officer families. Participants will learn about creating digital newsletters, shaping their agency family wellness brand, leveraging free design programs, and hosting virtual events.

    Officer family engagement and support is not limited to in-person activities or annual events. Join Kimberly Jackson-Luzader, Coordinator for Raleigh, NC Police Department’s “Families Behind the Badge,” and the IACP for a webinar on strategies to digitally engage family members. Using free online resources and digital platforms, agencies can offer valuable wellness tools and support that best meets the needs of their officer families. Participants will learn about creating digital newsletters, shaping their agency family wellness brand, leveraging free design programs, and hosting virtual events.

    Target Audience: Law enforcement families and law enforcement officers 

    Objectives: 1. Leverage free online resources to effectively engage officers and their families. 2. Understand the opportunities and formats of online engagement. 

    Project Funding Provided By: Motorola Solutions Foundation The Law Enforcement Family Support Group Program Training and Technical Assistance Program

    Includes: A webinar featuring Raleigh Police Department's "Families Behind the Badge" coordinator Kimberly Jackson-Luzader, discussing strategies to digitally engage law enforcement family members. 

    Kimberly Jackson-Luzader

    Trauma Counselor, Coordinator for Families Behind the Badge

  • Building Human Trafficking Cases with Intimidated and Missing Victims

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A webinar providing strategies for minimizing opportunities for intimidation and maximizing offender accountability when victims of human trafficking are intimidated or missing. Specifically, the webinar discusses protective orders, courthouse safety measures, and strategies for bringing the voice of survivors into the courtroom through the doctrine of forfeiture by wrongdoing and other rules of evidence.  To learn more about IACP’s anti-human trafficking resources, go to the https://www.theiacp.org/projects/anti-human-trafficking-training-and-technical-assistance.

    A webinar providing strategies for minimizing opportunities for intimidation and maximizing offender accountability when victims of human trafficking are intimidated or missing. Specifically, the webinar discusses protective orders, courthouse safety measures, and strategies for bringing the voice of survivors into the courtroom through the doctrine of forfeiture by wrongdoing and other rules of evidence. 

    Target Audience: Law Enforcement, Prosecutors, Victim Service Providers, and allied professionals 

    Objectives: To support victims' participation in the criminal justice process; minimize and respond to witness intimidation; and identify victim statements that may be admissible without the victim testifying. 

    Project Funding Provided By: The U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime

    Includes: A webinar featuring presenter Jane Anderson, Attorney Advisor, AEquitas, and moderator Jessie Plamp, Project Coordinator, International Association of Chiefs of Police 

    To learn more about IACP’s anti-human trafficking resources, go to the https://www.theiacp.org/projects/anti-human-trafficking-training-and-technical-assistance.

    Jane Anderson, JD

    Attorney Advisor, AEquitas: The Prosecutors’ Resource on Violence Against Women

    Jane Anderson joined AEquitas in October 2014 after having served as an Assistant State Attorney in Miami Dade County. As an Attorney Advisor with AEquitas, Jane leverages her experience prosecuting domestic violence, sexual violence, stalking, and human trafficking crimes to provide technical assistance and trainings to prosecutors and allied professionals as well as develop resources, publications, and training curricula. As a prosecutor, Jane tried many of Florida’s first human trafficking cases, including related sexual assault, child abuse, and money laundering crimes. As a founding member of the Miami-Dade State Attorney’s Human Trafficking Unit and Task Force, Jane developed key partnerships and infrastructure that improved victim identification and safety, while ensuring that offenders were held accountable. Jane particularly focused on building stronger prosecutions through the use of cyber investigations, digital evidence, and racketeering (RICO) statutes. In December 2013, Jane successfully prosecuted a trafficking case where the victim did not testify at trial. Jane held several supervisory positions where she oversaw the prosecutions of domestic violence, stalking, human trafficking, and other felony level crimes. Prior to focusing on Human Trafficking prosecutions, Jane served as the Chief of Litigation for the Misdemeanor Domestic Violence Unit – the same unit where she started her legal career. While a supervisor, she trained and supervised new lawyers in the complexities of intimate partner violence and prosecutions, including best practices for victim interviewing, pretrial litigation, and trial strategies. Jane graduated cum laude with a Juris Doctor from American University, Washington College of Law, after earning a Bachelor of Arts in History from the University of Washington in Seattle. Prior to her legal career, she lived and taught English in Bangkok, Thailand. Jane is currently based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Jane is also a member of the IACP technical assistance (TA) team as a consultant and Task Force Liaison for six ECM task forces.

    Jessie Plamp (Moderator)

    Project Coordinator, IACP

    Jessie Plamp is a member of the IACP Programs Team where she currently works as the Project Coordinator on the Enhancing Law Enforcement Human Trafficking Task Force Operations Program to support the needs of ECM task forces through training and curriculum development. She previously worked as the Project Assistant on the BJA Enhanced Collaborative Model (ECM) Human Trafficking Task Force Training and Technical Assistance (TTA) Program to support the needs of the local ECM task forces.  

    Before joining the IACP Jessie worked as an Assistant Supervisor at Eye2Eye Optometry Office, overseeing staff and responding to the medical needs of patients. Jessie earned her Bachelor of Science in Neuroscience from Michigan State University and Master of Arts in Forensic Psychology from George Washington University. During her Master’s Program she was an intern at The National Consortium for the Study of Terrorism and Responses to Terrorism (START), where she developed curriculum modules, using Power Point and Google Slides, on the profile of cybercriminals.  

  • Drug/Alcohol-Facilitated Sexual Assault (DFSB) Webinar

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar, “Drug and Alcohol-Facilitated Sexual Assault (DFSB)”, will address the complexities of sexual assault cases facilitated by drugs and/or alcohol. Alcohol and/or drugs are a frequent component of sexual assault cases because of how they can be used by the perpetrator to increase victim’s the vulnerability, accessibility, and perceived lack of credibility. A traumatic experience like sexual assault affects how memories are encoded and stored. Adding incapacitating substances like alcohol and drugs on top of this can further impact a victim’s memory. Therefore, it is important for law enforcement and others in the criminal justice system to understand the impacts of alcohol and drugs on victims as well as the tactics perpetrators use to commit sexual assault; combined with trauma-informed and perpetrator-focused investigative strategies in these cases, investigators can thoroughly examine the context and present an accurate case. This webinar will provide investigative strategies that better support victims as they recall details of the assault and that obtain more evidence to better hold perpetrators accountable.

    This webinar, “Drug and Alcohol-Facilitated Sexual Assault (DFSB)”, will address the complexities of sexual assault cases facilitated by drugs and/or alcohol. Alcohol and/or drugs are a frequent component of sexual assault cases because of how they can be used by the perpetrator to increase victim’s the vulnerability, accessibility, and perceived lack of credibility. A traumatic experience like sexual assault affects how memories are encoded and stored. Adding incapacitating substances like alcohol and drugs on top of this can further impact a victim’s memory. Therefore, it is important for law enforcement and others in the criminal justice system to understand the impacts of alcohol and drugs on victims as well as the tactics perpetrators use to commit sexual assault; combined with trauma-informed and perpetrator-focused investigative strategies in these cases, investigators can thoroughly examine the context and present an accurate case. This webinar will provide investigative strategies that better support victims as they recall details of the assault and that obtain more evidence to better hold perpetrators accountable. 

    Target Audience: Law Enforcement 

    Objectives: • Describe how perpetrators use alcohol and drugs as a weapon to facilitate committing sexual assaults by increasing victim vulnerability and decreasing credibility • Explain common perpetrator defense strategies • Identify strategies for trauma-informed investigation of alcohol and drug-facilitated sexual assault cases 

    Project Funding Provided By: Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women 

    This project was supported by Grant No. 2017-TA-AX-K053 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. 

    Includes: • The components of perpetrators' modus operandi • How perpetrators use drugs and/or alcohol to facilitate committing sexual assaults • The impact of alcohol on memory • The implications for interviewing the victim • The common perpetrator defense strategies • Offender-focused investigation strategies to bolster the evidence of assault

    Rob Fanelli

    Captain

    Gainesville, Florida, Police Department

    Captain Rob Fanelli is currently an operations commander at the Gainesville Police Department. Prior to his promotion to captain he was the Criminal Investigations Division Commander. He has 18 years of law enforcement experience with a diverse career. He has experience in policy writing and compliance, investigations, street crime units, and administration. His goal is to improve the profession of Law Enforcement by challenging thoughts and misconceptions, sharing ideas, encouraging communication across agencies and disciplines, and passing knowledge on to a new generation of law enforcement officers.     

    Captain Fanelli has a Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Florida in Criminology. He went on to receive a Master’s in Business Administration from Saint Leo University and completed his dissertation on Effective Police Organizational Structure: Managerial Economics of a Police Department. As a result of his participation in several IACP projects on enhancing response to gender-based violence he now provides technical assistance and is a consultant for the IACP. He is currently enrolled as a fellow in the Bloomberg School of Public at Johns Hopkins pursuing a Master’s In Public Health with a focus on violence in communities.       

  • The Impact of Trauma: A Trauma-Informed Lens and Response Webinar

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar, “The Impact of Trauma: A Trauma-Informed Lens and Response”, discusses how traumatic experiences can impact victim memory, reactions and behavior, and the implications of this for first responders’ and investigators’ interviews and investigations. While this webinar focuses on the impact of trauma as it relates to the investigation of sexual assault cases, the information is relevant for any incident where a traumatic event has occurred such as a car accident or burglary.

    This webinar, “The Impact of Trauma: A Trauma-Informed Lens and Response”, discusses how traumatic experiences can impact victim memory, reactions and behavior, and the implications of this for first responders’ and investigators’ interviews and investigations. While this webinar focuses on the impact of trauma as it relates to the investigation of sexual assault cases, the information is relevant for any incident where a traumatic event has occurred such as a car accident or burglary. The presenter for this webinar is Corporal Angela Weekes (retired) from Nampa Police Department. She recently retired after over twenty-six years at the department. Her most recent position was as a Corporal in the Crimes Against Person’s Unit in the investigations division. 

    Target Audience: Law Enforcement 

    Objectives: • Explain that people react differently to trauma and no one reaction is “normal.” • Describe how the neurobiology of trauma impacts memory, reactions, and behavior. • Apply their understanding of trauma to conduct interviews that obtain additional information and evidence. • Observe, explain, and document signs of trauma as evidence. 

    Project Funding Provided By: Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women 

    This project was supported by Grant No. 2017-TA-AX-K053 awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women. 

    Includes: • Trauma defined • How the body responds during a traumatic event - Freeze, Flight, Fight • How trauma impacts victim behavior • How trauma impacts victim memory • The tenets of trauma-informed interviews • The importance of addressing vicarious trauma that first responders are exposed to

    Angela Weekes

    Corporal (Retired), Nampa, Illinois, Police Department

    Corporal Angela Weekes (retired) from Nampa Police Department. She recently retired after over twenty-six years at the department. Her most recent position was as a Corporal in the Crimes Against Person’s Unit in the investigations division. Corporal Weekes is an active member of the Canyon County Multidisciplinary Team of Child Abuse, the Canyon County SART and the Canyon County Child Death Review team. Corporal Weekes is also the visionary component of the Nampa Family Justice Center. Nampa was recognized for their efforts in this field by their selection as a model site to develop Family Justice Centers.