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  • Contains 18 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A monthly training series geared towards addressing vicarious trauma response across VTRI Community Implementation Site partners.

    A monthly training series geared towards addressing vicarious trauma response across VTRI Community Implementation Site partners.

    Target Audience: Community Implementation Sites

    Overall Objective: A training series hosted by the Vicarious Trauma Response Initiative for all partner organizations across the 12 Community Implementation Sites focusing on mitigating the negative effects of work-related trauma exposure and building partnerships and collaborations to address vicarious trauma response on an organizational level.

    Project Funding Provided By: The Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice

    Includes: Monthly webinars hosted by the Vicarious Trauma Response Initiative 

    Rob Fanelli

    Captain

    Gainesville, Florida, Police Department

    Captain Rob Fanelli is currently an operations commander at the Gainesville Police Department. Prior to his promotion to captain he was the Criminal Investigations Division Commander. He has 18 years of law enforcement experience with a diverse career. He has experience in policy writing and compliance, investigations, street crime units, and administration. His goal is to improve the profession of Law Enforcement by challenging thoughts and misconceptions, sharing ideas, encouraging communication across agencies and disciplines, and passing knowledge on to a new generation of law enforcement officers.     

    Captain Fanelli has a Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Florida in Criminology. He went on to receive a Master’s in Business Administration from Saint Leo University and completed his dissertation on Effective Police Organizational Structure: Managerial Economics of a Police Department. As a result of his participation in several IACP projects on enhancing response to gender-based violence he now provides technical assistance and is a consultant for the IACP. He is currently enrolled as a fellow in the Bloomberg School of Public at Johns Hopkins pursuing a Master’s In Public Health with a focus on violence in communities.       

    Karen Hangartner

    LMSW

    National Children's Advocacy Center

    Karen Hangartner, LMSW, is Project Director for the Southern Regional Children’s Advocacy Center, a project of the National Children’s Advocacy Center (NCAC) and a TTA Coordinator with the Vicarious Trauma Response Initiative (VTRI). The NCAC was the first Child Advocacy Center in the world, and continues to provide prevention and intervention services for child abuse victims in Huntsville/Madison County, AL; and, also houses the NCAC Training Center, the Southern Regional Children’s Advocacy Center, the NCAC Virtual Training Center, and the Child Abuse Library Online (CALiO). Ms. Hangartner holds a BS degree in Psychology from Athens State University and Masters in Social Work from The University of Alabama. She has been with the National Children’s Advocacy Center since 2003, spending four years in the Prevention department before beginning work with the Southern Regional Children’s Advocacy Center. As Project Director for SRCAC, Karen is responsible for developing and delivering training for Children’s Advocacy Centers, Multidisciplinary teams, and State Chapter organizations across 16 states and the District of Columbia. She has conducted more than 200 trainings for MDTs, CACs and Chapters in the Southern region. She also presents at state, national and international conferences on a variety of topics including, Secondary Traumatic Stress, Trauma Informed Multidisciplinary Teams, Team Functioning, and Leading in a Multidisciplinary Environment. She also works with regional and national partners on collaborative projects. Prior to joining the NCAC staff, Karen served as Children’s Minister at First Baptist Church in Huntsville, Alabama.

    Meg Hefty

    Associate Director

    Sarah's Inn

    Meg has over twenty years of experience as a Domestic Violence professional.  As Associate Director of Sarah’s Inn, one of the largest and most comprehensive domestic violence agencies serving Chicago and the West Cook County suburbs, Ms. Hefty oversees all advocacy and counseling programs, including the legal advocacy program and partner abuse intervention program.  During her nineteen years with Sarah’s Inn, she has built successful partnerships for solid legal programming at two courthouses, became the lead trainer for law enforcement personnel, and was named Advocate of the Year by the States Attorneys’ Office (2006).  Ms. Hefty is also served as co-chair of the Cicero Community Collaborative, a coalition of local service providers focused on improving the health, education, and well-being of Cicero children, youth and families. Ms. Hefty served for many years on the Board of the Illinois Certified Domestic Violence Professionals, Inc. and City of Chicago's Community Development Advisory Committee. She has also served as an expert witness in several domestic violence related Child Welfare cases. She holds a B.A. in Behavioral Science and Law from University of Wisconsin, Madison and is an Illinois Certified Domestic Violence Professional and a Partner Abuse Intervention Program counselor. 

    Meghan Meyer, Ed.D

    School Psychologist

    Community Consolidated School District 15, Formerly at J. Sterling Morton High School District 201

    Dr. Meghan Meyer is a former member of the Cicero Community Collaborative Health and Safety Committee and current member of the Beyond Trauma team. Through her work with supporting students in her career as a school psychologist, she has become a passionate advocate and educator on trauma as she recognizes how trauma significantly impacts youth and communities. Meghan received her doctorate in school psychology with a specialization in mental health from Loyola University and focused on building a trauma-informed school for her dissertation research. She worked within her former and current school districts and the communities to build awareness on trauma in hopes to build resilience and better support students, teachers and families. In her free time, she loves spending time with her young children and her family. Reading, walking and traveling help keep her life in balance.

    Jackie Wallen, LCPC

    Resiliency Counseling Collective

    Jackie Wallen earned degrees from Cedarville University and Chicago State University.  Prior to her recent move to the East Coast, she resided for 14 years in Cicero, IL where she was actively involved in helping the local communities become more trauma informed, focusing on school systems and law enforcement . She served as the Associate Director of Counseling Services at Youth Crossroads, a youth serving non-profit that works with marginalized youth and family.  She was instrumental in helping Cicero PD and Maywood PD develop officer wellness programs in her role as their Department Clinician.  She is currently working with Volunteers of America Alaska and the Anchorage Public School System to develop school based counseling programs in 9 public schools.  She frequently finds herself in the role bridge builder—finding great meaning in helping marginalized individuals/groups and systems work together for the betterment of all.  When she isn’t working, Jackie loves having adventures with her husband, Joel, and their children, Justus and Deacon. 

    Meg Garvin

    Executive Director & Clinical Professor of Law, MA, JD

    National Crime Victim Law Institute

    Meg Garvin is the Executive Director of the National Crime Victim Law Institute (NCVLI) and a Clinical Professor of Law at Lewis & Clark Law School. Ms. Garvin is recognized as a leading expert on victims’ rights. She has testified before Congress, state legislatures and the Judicial Proceedings Panel on Sexual Assault in the Military. In her expert capacity she has served on the Defense Advisory Committee on Investigation, Prosecution and Defense of Sexual Assault in the Armed Forces, the Victims Advisory Group of the United States Sentencing Commission, and the Victim Services Subcommittee, of the Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crime Panel of the United States Department of Defense, as co-chair of the American Bar Association’s Criminal Justice Section Victims Committee, co-chair of the Oregon Attorney General’s Crime Victims’ Rights Task Force and as a member of the Legislative & Public Policy Committee of the Oregon Attorney General’s Sexual Assault Task Force.  She has received numerous awards in recognition of her work, including in 2015 the John W. Gillis Leadership Award from National Parents of Murdered Children; in 2020, the American Bar Association Criminal Justice Section’s Frank Carrington Crime Victim Attorney Award, and in 2021, the Hardy Myers Victim Advocacy Award from the Oregon Crime Victims Law Center. Prior to joining NCVLI, Ms. Garvin practiced law in Minneapolis, Minnesota and clerked for the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Pronouns: she/her/hers. 

    Chris Newlin

    Executive Director, MS LPC

    National Children's Advocacy Center

    Chris Newlin is the executive director of the National Children’s Advocacy Center (NCAC) in Huntsville, AL, where he is responsible for providing leadership and management of the agency, as well as participating in national and international training and leadership activities regarding the protection of children.  The NCAC was the first Children’s Advocacy Center (CAC) in the world and provides child abuse prevention and intervention services in Huntsville/Madison County; and also houses the NCAC Training Center, the Southern Regional Children’s Advocacy Center, the NCAC Virtual Training Center, and the Child Abuse Library Online (CALiO).  The NCAC is a past multi-year winner of the Better Business Bureau’s Torch Award for Workplace Ethics; 2012 Huntsville/Madison County Chamber of Commerce Non-Profit of the Year; 2016 Federal Bureau of Investigation Director’s Community Leadership Award recipient; (multi-year finalist), winner in 2017 and 2019 of the Huntsville/Madison County Chamber of Commerce Best Places to Work; and a Private Sector Member of the Virtual Global Taskforce.  Chris has more than 24 years of experience working in CACs as a forensic interviewervictim advocateclinical director, and executive director. He has provided training in more than 30 countries at numerous international conferences and continues to provide technical assistance on a regular basis to professionals working to develop multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) and CACs throughout the world. Chris received his master’s degree in school psychology from the University of Central Arkansas, is a licensed professional counselor, and has completed coursework at the Harvard University Business School Executive Education Program.

    Paula Gomez Stordy

    Senior Director of National Training and Technical Assistance

    Esperanza United

    Paula Gomez Stordy has more than 25 years of experience working in the field of gender-based violence, of which 17 years were in non-profit management. She is the Senior Director of National Training and Technical Assistance for Esperanza United: National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities, a national resource center with a focus on providing training, research, and policy advocacy to prevent and end domestic violence and sexual assault. Ms. Gomez Stordy directs national training and technical assistance overseeing federal grants, programming, and supervision of staff to enhance culturally responsive approaches and capacity to both mainstream and culturally specific organizations across the country.

    Leo Martinez

    Project Manager

    Esperanza United

    Leo Martinez is a Project Manager with Esperanza United, formerly Casa de Esperanza - National Latin@ Network. With Esperanza United he currently works providing Language Access and Cultural Responsiveness training as part of the national resource center on domestic violence in the Latino community; he is a Training and Technical Assistance lead with the Vicarious Trauma Response Initiative, a national initiative funded by the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) and led by the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP); he informs the Intimate Partner Homicide project focused on Latino victims and funded by the Office on Violence against Women (OVW). He also collaborates on the Enhancing Access Peer to Peer project focused on language access, funded also by the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC). 

    Rosanna Balistreri

    President

    National Council on Interpreting in Health Care

    Rosanna Balistreri is the founder of REACH-reaching diversity and has 30 years of professional background in translation, interpreting, and teaching.  As an experienced trainer and curriculum developer for Spanish Translation & Interpretation programs, she has taught at SDSU, CSUF and CSUSM.  She is a past President of the California Healthcare Interpreting Association, and is presently the President of the National Council on Interpreting in Health Care, where she previously served as Chair of the Standards and Training Committee & Co-chair of the Languages of Limited Diffusion Work Group. Her academic background is in General Linguistics and Spanish Applied Linguistics, and she is a licensed trainer for the Applied Suicide Intervention Skill Training (ASIST).  Through REACH she has developed assessment tools and quality educational and training content for healthcare interpreters and healthcare professionals, and provides consulting in the areas of diversity, leadership skills & cross-cultural communication. 

    Eliana Lobo

    National Council on Interpreting in Health Care

    An experienced court and medical interpreter, Eliana is a DSHS-WA state authorized medical interpreter, a certified Trainer of Trainers (ToT™) of medical interpreters, and a nationally certified CoreCHI™ healthcare interpreter. Holding two M.A.s from Brown University, in Bilingual Education, and Portuguese & Brazilian Studies, Eliana began her career as a Spanish/Portuguese medical interpreter at RI Hospital. In 2008, hired as the Trainer and Supervisor for Harborview Medical Center’s Interpreter Services. Subsequently, served as the National Director of Interpreter Quality for InDemand, and Director of Multicultural Programs and Services for IEO. Currently, the Director of Lobo Language Access in Tacoma WA, Eliana consults on language access plans, and interpreter training curricula. As an Adjunct Professor at Highline College, she teaches a 120-hour Professional healthcare Interpreter course during the Spring and Fall quarters. A frequent speaker at healthcare interpreter conferences, presenter/co- host for NCIHC’s “Home for Trainers” webinar series, she has hosted nearly fifty webinars for medical interpreter trainers since 2015. NCIHC Board member, and currently, the Standards and Training Committee Chair, Eliana also volunteers as a CCHI Commissioner. 

  • Contains 5 Component(s)

    Officer Family Wellness Podcast Series interviews experts on various health and wellness topics to inform law enforcement leaders and help families thrive.

    Officer Family Wellness Podcast Series features a variety of subject matter experts with insight for those looking to create or enhance family wellness both in policing agencies and at home. Episodes feature discussions on sleep hygiene, communication in families, financial wellness, suicide prevention, and family resilience. 

    Target Audience: Agency leadership, officers and policing families. 

    Overall Objective: Provide insight and tangible actions for law enforcement stakeholders looking to enhance officer family wellness. 

    Project Funding Provided By: Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) 

    Includes: Podcast episode topics include healthy sleep habits, communication, financial wellness, suicide prevention, and family resilience.

    Dr. Lois James

    Assistant Professor

    Washington State University College of Nursing

    Lois James, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the Washington State University (WSU) College of Nursing, where she focuses on bias, stress, sleep, and performance in “high stress” populations such as police officers, military personnel, nurses, and top tier athletes. 

    Cyndi Doyle, LPC-S, NCC, CDWF, CCISM

    Licensed Professional Counselor Supervisor

    Code4Couples

    Cyndi Doyle is a Licensed Professional Counselor Supervisor in Texas, National Certified Counselor, and Certified Daring Way Facilitator for Dr. Brene Brown. She is the co-owner of Pecan Branch Counseling in Denton, Texas. Cyndi is certified in Critical Incident Stress Management and serves on local CISM teams as well as the Dallas/Fort Worth regional team. Cyndi's passions include serving the first responder community and other mental health professionals. In 2017, Cyndi's passion for first responders and their spouses inspired her to found Code4Couples, a company dedicated to support and increase resilience in first responders, their spouses, and their relationships. Through her Code4Couples podcast, Cyndi normalizes experiences of first responders and their spouses by sharing her own journey and stories as a Law Enforcement spouse, educates them on related mental health and relationship difficulties, empowers them with tools, techniques, and resources, and promotes connection within the First Responder community.  

    Daniel Scesney

    Chief

    Grand Prairie, Texas Police Department

    Chief Daniel Scesney (Grand Prairie, Texas Police Department) came to Texas in 1998 after serving his country in the United States Marine Corps as a Military Police Officer. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice Administration from Columbia College and a Master of Science in Criminal Justice and Criminology from Texas Christian University (TCU). His career with GPPD began in 2001 during which time he served in a variety of capacities including Patrol Officer, Directed Patrol Unit, SWAT Team Leader, Narcotics, Property Crimes, Domestic Crimes, Major Crimes (including adult and child homicide investigations), Patrol Supervisor, and has commanded both the Special Operations and Investigative Services Bureau as the Assistant Chief of Police.  

    Deborah Marson, CDFA, M.B.A., IACP Women’s Leadership Institute

    Deborah Marson teaches the financial wellness lesson of IACP’s Women’s Leadership Institute course, in which she discusses retirement, investments, estate planning, and other pertinent financial topics to law enforcement professionals from around the globe. Ms. Marson has over 12 years of experience specializing in comprehensive financial planning.  Her professional expertise in financial planning includes the areas of Budgeting, Investments, Tax Planning, Retirement, College Planning and Life, Disability and Long-Term Care Insurance.  

    Dr. Robert Cipriano

    Police Psychologist

    SIMCIP GROUP Forensic-Psychological Consultants

    Dr. Robert J. Cipriano Jr. has been working with the community professionally within the field of psychology for 22 years. His undergraduate training in psychology was completed at Florida State University and he completed a doctoral program accredited by the American Psychological Association (APA) in clinical psychology at Carlos Albizu University in Miami, Florida. He completed his doctoral internship at one of the largest state hospitals that housed the “criminally insane” within the Central United States. He currently owns and has developed his training and consulting business, SIMCIP GROUP Forensic-Psychological Consultants, located in Pembroke Pines, Florida. 

    Ret. Deputy Chief Dianne Bernhard

    Executive Director

    Concerns of Police Survivors

    During her 21 years with the Columbia Police Department, Dianne Bernhard rose from patrol officer to deputy chief, supervised the Youth Services Unit, and served as the president of the Missouri School Resource Officer Association. 

    Bernhard retired from CPD to take a job as executive director of Concerns of Police Survivors — a national organization that supports the families of officers killed in the line of duty. Bernhard knows what it's like to lose a colleague. She said the hardest day of her career was when Officer Molly Bowden was killed during a traffic stop in 2005. 

    Bernhard joined CPD in 1992 as a patrol officer. Five years later, after serving as a detective and a community police officer, she was promoted to sergeant. In 2007, she was promoted to lieutenant and was responsible for daytime and evening patrols. She was promoted to deputy chief in 2012.

    As executive director, Bernhard leads an organization whose programs have helped 32,000 people. 

    Sgt. Kevin Kinney and Megan Kinney

    Sergeant Kevin Kinney is a Headquarters Sergeant with the State of South Dakota Highway Patrol. Kevin has been with the agency for over 17 years. One of his roles is working on officer and staff wellness and helping the officers learn how to be resilient in this type of job that tends to wear people out. 

    Megan Kinney has been married to Kevin Kinney for 20 years. She is very passionate about Officer Wellness and how the family is involved in supporting their officer. Megan and Kevin have four daughters that keep them pretty busy. 

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A series of virtual listening sessions that provide public safety personnel with information on the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on providing emergency services and responding to victims through vicarious trauma lens.

    A series of virtual listening sessions that provide public safety personnel with information on the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on providing emergency services and responding to victims through vicarious trauma lens. 

    Target Audience: Fire and Emergency Medical Services personnel

    Overall Objective: To provide Fire and EMS personnel with information on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and vicarious trauma strategies.

    Project Funding Provided By: The Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime.

    Includes: A series of virtual listening sessions featuring discussions between subject matter experts, including IACP President Chief Steven R. Casstevens, that provide Fire and EMS personnel with information on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on emergency responders, and vicarious trauma response strategies.

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Serving crime victims from linguistically diverse communities requires preparation and use of strategies embedded at all layers of the justice process. Framed around the seven critical needs of victims (safety, support, information, access, continuity, voice, justice), this webinar provides law enforcement and allied professionals an overview of legal obligations and standards around language access, tips for working with interpreters, and promising practices for police agencies. By addressing language access needs, agencies can eliminate or reduce barriers and support victims’ participation in the criminal justice system, thereby enhancing investigations, prosecution of crimes, and public safety.

    Serving crime victims from linguistically diverse communities requires preparation and use of strategies embedded at all layers of the justice process. Framed around the seven critical needs of victims (safety, support, information, access, continuity, voice, justice), this webinar provides law enforcement and allied professionals an overview of legal obligations and standards around language access, tips for working with interpreters, and promising practices for police agencies. By addressing language access needs, agencies can eliminate or reduce barriers and support victims’ participation in the criminal justice system, thereby enhancing investigations, prosecution of crimes, and public safety.

    Target Audience: Law enforcement and allied professionals (e.g., victim services personnel, communications personnel, crime scene personnel) 

    Overall Objectives: At the conclusion of the webinar, participants will be better able to: 1. Identify and give examples of the seven critical needs of victims. 2. Understand the language access compliance requirements of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. 3. Implement language access strategies in the justice system. 4. Identify points of contact in law enforcement agencies and system- and community-based victim service organizations. 

    Project Funding Provided By: Office for Victims of Crime (OVC)

    This presentation was developed by the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) under Cooperative Agreement 2018-V3-GX-K066 and the Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence (API-GBV) under Cooperative Agreement 2018-V3-GX-K061, both awarded by the Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this presentation are those of the contributors and do not necessarily represent the official position of the U.S. Department of Justice. 

    Shelli Sonnenberg

    Detective

    Boise, Idaho, Police Department

    Detective Shelli Sonnenberg graduated cum laude from the University of Idaho in 1998, with a degree in Crime and Justice Studies. Shelli began her law enforcement career with the Boise Police Department in 1999, at which time she was honored to be voted President of her POST Academy. She spent the first 4 years of her career working in patrol, 9 years on the Community Policing Team, as a Neighborhood Contact Officer and then the Refugee Liaison. The last 9 years she has been assigned to the Criminal Investigation Division, as a Detective. She is also a Crisis Negotiator and a member of the Honor Guard. In 2006, Detective Sonnenberg was chosen BPD Officer of the Year by her peers, something she considers a highlight in her career. Some of her most rewarding work came when she was the Refugee Liaison. Shelli worked closely with the refugee resettlement agencies and community outreach groups in the Boise area, providing educational and safety information to the New Americans when they arrive in the U.S. In turn, she created a Refugee Awareness curriculum to assist her fellow officers in the field and then created the Boise PD Interpreter/Translator Program, which is used to help officers and LEP persons communicate in a more efficient manner. This program is also used by the other agencies in the Treasure Valley when a language barrier exists. In 2009, Boise PD was honored by the Vera Institute of Justice as one of the top cities in the US who were “Bridging the Language Divide.

    Cannon Han

    Senior Program Manager

    Asian Pacific Institute on Gender-Based Violence

    Cannon Han is a Senior Program Manager with API-GBV.  He has over ten years of experience providing technical assistance and training to programs on: Title VI compliance and advocacy; language access; interpretation; and translation. Prior to re-joining API, he was the Title VI Administrator for Caltrain and the San Mateo Transit District.  He also served as a Senior Court Services Analyst with the California Administrative Office of the Courts, Court Interpreter Program, and an attorney with the Mental Health Advocacy Project. 

    Heather Dooley

    Project Manager, IACP

    Heather Dooley is currently a Project Manager for the International Association of Chiefs of Police, and her portfolio includes primary management of the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) Enhancing Law Enforcement Response to Victims (ELERV) initiative and co-management of the OVC Law Enforcement-Based Victim Services (LEV) Program. Her responsibilities include oversight of demonstration sites teams and grantees, training content and resource development, and delivery of training and technical assistance on victim-centered, trauma-informed practices in law enforcement agencies. Ms. Dooley also served as an Advisory Board Member for the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) Measuring Success in the Criminal Justice System’s Response to Domestic/Dating Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking Assault, and Stalking: A Pilot Project. Before joining the IACP, Ms. Dooley served as the Social Services Program Coordinator for the Travis County Sheriff’s Office Victim Services Unit in Austin, TX, where she managed volunteer and internship programs, provided direct services to victims of crime and crisis circumstances, and provided training for Unit personnel and sworn personnel. Ms. Dooley has participated in a variety of community-wide collaborative efforts, including initiatives focused on enhancing sexual assault response, promoting a trauma-informed approach to intimate partner violence, and improving outcomes for children and families in the child welfare system. Ms. Dooley has a Master of Social Work degree and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    This webinar will cover specific, demonstrated approaches from an individual and agency perspective to identify, respond to, manage, and prevent distress that impacts an officer’s ability to do their job effectively.

    Stress is a normal reaction to daily pressures. Law enforcement officers’ stress can build up over the course of navigating difficult life and work events. When this stress becomes too much to deal with or overwhelms an officer’s coping mechanisms, distress can occur and impact safety and wellness. To maintain a healthy and optimal level of functioning, individuals and agencies must recognize when distress is occurring and be equipped to employ strategies to restore balance. Whether it is recognizing when yourself or your fellow officer might need more support or implementing organizational changes to support officer safety and wellness, everyone has a role to play when distress occurs. 

    Target Audience: Law enforcement officers

    Overall Objectives: To provide law enforcement officers with strategies to help prevent distress from occurring and to restore balance

    Project Funding Provided By: Bureau of Justice Assistance

    Includes: A webinar that highlights stress prevention approaches from an individual and agency perspective 

    Jennifer D. Griffin, Captain, PhD

    Captain / Ph.D.

    Delaware State Police / University of Delaware

    Captain Jennifer D. Griffin, Ph.D. is a Patrol Operations Commander and Chair of the Employee Wellness Unit for the Delaware State Police, an Adjunct Professor at the University of Delaware (U.D.), a certified Performance Coach, Yoga Alliance RYT 200 Yoga Instructor, and a Performance and Mental Training Coach for the U.D. Div. 1 Women’s Field Hockey Team. She has over 21 years of law enforcement experience in a variety of assignments and ranks. She has a Doctorate from the University of Delaware Sociology / Criminal Justice Department, where she currently teaches four classes. Captain Griffin is a peer-reviewed author and presents nationally and internationally to include: The United States of America, China, Taiwan, and Canada. She is an F.B.I. National Academy Associates Training Committee member & Comprehensive Officer Resiliency Program Master Instructor, and a recognized Resiliency Subject Matter Expert with the United States Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Collaborative Reform Initiative Technical Assistance Center (CRI-TAC). She is also a graduate of the F.B.I. National Academy graduate of Session 268, United States Secret Service Dignitary Protection Seminar, and the I.A.C.P. Leadership in Police Organizations (L.P.O.) Program. She has presented numerous times at both the I.A.C.P. Annual Conference and the I.A.C.P. Officer Safety and Wellness Symposium.

    Audrey Fellingham

    Officer

    Metropolitan Nashville, Tennessee, Police Department

    Audrey Fellingham has been a law enforcement officer for eight years total. She was first a patrol officer for Metropolitan Nashville Police Department in Nashville, TN. and currently is a patrol officer for Durham Police Department in North Carolina. Audrey is also a military veteran having served two tours of duty in Iraq while she was an active duty soldier assigned to 101st Airborne Division out of Fort Campbell, KY. and is currently an Army Reservist Staff Sergeant with the 377th CBRN Company.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A series of virtual listening sessions that provide law enforcement and first responder personnel with information on strategies and lessons learned around supporting victims and agency personnel as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    A series of virtual listening sessions that provide law enforcement and first responder personnel with information on strategies and lessons learned around supporting victims and agency personnel as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

    Target Audience: Law enforcement officers and first responder personnel

    Overall Objective: To provide information on the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on policing through a vicarious trauma lens.

    Project Funding Provided By: The Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime.

    Includes: A series of virtual listening sessions featuring discussions between subject matter experts, including IACP President Chief Steven R. Casstevens, that provide law enforcement officers and first responder personnel with information on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on policing and vicarious trauma response strategies.

  • Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A series of virtual listening sessions that provide first responder personnel with information around the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the field of victim advocacy. The sessions explore strategies and lessons learned to continue providing trauma informed services to victims while ensuring first responders are healthy and resilient.

    A series of virtual listening sessions that provide first responder personnel with information around the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic has had on the field of victim advocacy. The sessions explore strategies and lessons learned to continue providing trauma informed services to victims while ensuring first responders are healthy and resilient.

    Target Audience: Law enforcement officers, first responder personnel, and victim advocates/victim services personnel

    Overall Objective: To provide information on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the victim advocacy field and vicarious trauma response strategies.

    Project Funding Provided By: The Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office for Victims of Crime.

    Includes: A series of virtual listening sessions featuring discussions between subject matter experts, including IACP President Chief Steven R. Casstevens, that provide law enforcement officers, first responder personnel, and victim advocates with information on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, and vicarious trauma response strategies.

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Understanding the effects of grief, signs of complicated grief, and strategies that can be supportive after a loss is critical for officers to continue to be able to do their work effectively. Implementing policies and programs to help officers recognize and access appropriate supports to process the pain from grief and loss can help officers heal and agencies to continue to operate. This webinar will present both agency and individual best practices that can help officers heal and grow from grief and loss. Officers, command staff, law enforcement employee assistance program personnel, officer safety and wellness staff, and mental health professionals all have a role to play in helping individuals and agencies struggling with these issues and are encouraged to attend.

    Understanding the effects of grief, signs of complicated grief, and strategies that can be supportive after a loss is critical for officers to continue to be able to do their work effectively. Implementing policies and programs to help officers recognize and access appropriate supports to process the pain from grief and loss can help officers heal and agencies to continue to operate. This webinar will present both agency and individual best practices that can help officers heal and grow from grief and loss. Officers, command staff, law enforcement employee assistance program personnel, officer safety and wellness staff, and mental health professionals all have a role to play in helping individuals and agencies struggling with these issues and are encouraged to attend.

    Target Audience: Law enforcement professionals

    Overall Objective: To provide agencies and individuals with best practices that can help officers heal and grow from grief and loss

    Project Funding Provided By: Bureau of Justice Assistance

    Includes: A webinar featuring subject matter experts discussing strategies to help officers heal and grow from grief and loss

    Robert A. Swartz

    Detective/Director

    Taunton, Massachusetts, Police Department /Southeastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council CISM

    Detective Robert Swartz is a 32-year Law Enforcement veteran. Swartz is currently assigned to the City of Taunton Massachusetts Police Department’s Detective Division.  In addition, Detective Swartz was a key participant in the creation of the Southeastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council’s Critical Incident Stress Management and Peer Support Team.  Swartz has served as the Director/Commander since the team’s inception. He is personally familiar with trauma and the result of exposure and is a certified instructor in Critical Incident Stress Management.

    Lewis Schlosser, PhD

    Police Psychologist

    The Institute for Forensic Psychology

    Lewis Z. Schlosser, PhD, ABPP, is the managing partner at the Institute for Forensic Psychology, which is a police and public safety focused specialty practice based in Oakland, New Jersey. Dr. Schlosser is a licensed psychologist in New York (#16482), New Jersey (#4822), and Maine (PS2163). He is Board Certified in Police and Public Safety Psychology (#8539) and Counseling Psychology (#6558) by the American Board of Professional Psychology. He is a former tenured Associate Professor at Seton Hall University and former in-house Director of Psychological Services for the New York City Correction Department. Dr. Schlosser has conducted over 10,000 law enforcement psychological evaluations, including pre-employment, promotional, and fitness for duty evaluations. He provides training to police personnel on a variety of topics related to officer mental health, with special expertise in officer wellness and fitness for duty.Dr. Schlosser is a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, Police Psychological Services Section. He currently serves on the Executive Board of the Police Psychological Services Section as the General Chair. Dr. Schlosser is also an affiliate member of the New Jersey State Association of Chiefs of Police and the Bergen County Police Chief's Association. He was recently named as the first Chief Psychologist for the New Jersey Association of Chiefs of Police. He is a member of the New Jersey Police Surgeons. Dr. Schlosser is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association.Dr. Schlosser earned his Bachelor’s degree in Psychology, his Master’s degree in Rehabilitation Counseling, and his PhD in Counseling Psychology, all from the University of Maryland at College Park.

  • Contains 15 Product(s)

    Purchase the 2021 Technology Conference Package ($75 for IACP members and $100 for non-members) and gain access to the 15 most popular workshops.

    Purchase the 2021 Technology Conference Package ($75 for IACP members and $100 for non-members) and gain access to the 15 most popular workshops.

    View the IACP 2021 Technology Conference homepage. 

  • Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This conference workshop presentation discusses California’s success in using the Rapid Deployment Method (RDM) to transition law enforcement agencies to NIBRS reporting by working directly with the RMS providers are profiled in this workshop.

    This conference workshop presentation discusses California's success in using the Rapid Deployment Method (RDM) to transition law enforcement agencies to NIBRS reporting by working directly with the RMS providers are profiled in this workshop. RDM maximizes process efficiencies to reduce the time and cost of transition critical to address limited funding and the time pressures due to the end of Summary Reporting. Law enforcement practitioners and CA DOJ identify their successes and lessons learned using RDM. Representatives from BJS and the IJIS Institute explain how attendees can leverage other RDM efficiencies to expedite their transition to NIBRS.

    Robert May

    Program Director

    IJIS Institute

    Robert L. May is program director at the IJIS Institute in Ashburn, VA. He has more than 44 years of criminal justice experience including in law enforcement and managing national criminal justice projects. Bob oversees the Institute?s subcontract with RTI providing implementation assistance to law enforcement agencies transitioning to incident-based reporting (NIBRS) through the BJS National Crime Statistics Exchange (NCS-X) project. He also serves as liaison for the IJIS CJIS Advisory Committee, Background Check Working Group and Law Enforcement Imaging Technology Task Force. Bob also provides both program management and technical assistance and oversees the maintenance and operational of the RxCheck prescription drug monitoring hub. Prior to joining the IJIS Institute, he served as principal with the Criminal Justice Institute for 14 years while simultaneously serving as associate director of the Association of State Correctional Administrators directing projects on reentry, corrections intelligence, and counterterrorism, and the CSG Criminal Justice Mental Health Framework project. He was a member of the FBI?s Information Sharing and N-DEx Operations Task Force. Previously, Bob was executive director of National Treatment Alternatives for Safer Communities where is directed major conferences including the National Conference on Drugs and Crime and the first National Drug Court Symposium. Early in his career, he served 12 years in state and local law enforcement in positions of chief of detectives and police lieutenant. Bob is a graduate of the 138th Session of the FBI National Academy, holds a Bachelor of Science degree in behavioral science from the University of Maryland and has completed post-graduate work in Criminal Justice Administration through the University of Virginia.

    Alyson Lunetta, MS, CCIA

    Manager, Investigative Services Program

    California Department of Justice

    Erica Smith

    Unit Chief, Law Enforcement Incident-Based Statistics

    US Department of Justice

    Erica L. Smith is Unit Chief of the Law Enforcement Incident-Based Statistics Unit at the Bureau of Justice Statistics in the US Department of Justice. She has over 20 years of experience in conducting research and data collection in the field of criminal justice. Ms. Smith is currently the Director of the National Crime Statistics Exchange (NCS-X) Initiative at BJS, a joint effort with the FBI to increase the reporting of incident-based crime data by law enforcement agencies to the FBI?s National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS). With the implementation of NCS-X, BJS and the FBI will be able to generate national estimates of crime using these detailed incident data for use in understanding hidden types of victimization such as elder abuse and sexual violence against children and adolescents. Ms. Smith also recently led the development and oversight of the Crime Indicators Working Group, comprised of leaders in the law enforcement community working with BJS and other Department of Justice agencies to outline the indicators of crime and public safety most pertinent to them in their capacity as civic leaders and that can best inform the public about the health and well-being of communities around the Nation. Ms. Smith recently oversaw the development of strategies for measuring victimization and abuse among older persons and persons with disabilities living in nursing homes and other group quarters residential facilities. In addition to her research portfolio, Ms. Smith is the BJS liaison to and former co-chair of the Federal Interagency Elder Justice Working Group and has worked closely with the Administration on Aging at the US Department of Health and Human Services to provide direct program support to the federal Elder Justice Coordinating Council.

    Maria Cardiellos

    Executive Director

    IJIS

    Maria M. Cardiellos serves as the Executive Director of the IJIS Institute. In this capacity, she is responsible for the strategic direction and executive leadership of the organization. She oversees the operations of the nonprofit organization and is responsible for financial management of the Institute's programs. Maria has over thirty-five (35) years' experience in public safety and justice program development, implementation and evaluation, both nationally and internationally. She is a highly motivated, nationally recognized leader that has succeeded during both her private and public sector tenures. She has successfully led national and regional initiatives that have brought together executives representing disparate domains, lawmakers and technology companies to ensure success.   Prior to her tenure with IJIS, she served in an executive level position as Chief of Staff of the Nationwide Suspicious Activity Reporting (SAR) Initiative (NSI).  In this role she directed executive staff/resources provided by sponsor partners to include no less than DOJ, DHS, FBI, ODNI and the White House. COS responsibilities included all subcontractor management; dialogue with congressional leaders / White House staff / American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU); overarching budget management. The overarching budget responsibilities for the design, development, implementation and oversight of solution delivery to the 78 fusion centers nationwide.  She was previously Chief Information Officer (CIO) for the New Jersey Department of Law and Public Safety (LPS) within the Office of the Attorney General (OAG), the largest state department in NJ. Her office supported the Information Technology (IT) needs of more than a dozen divisions/in-but-not-off offices, ranging in scope from the Division of State Police to the Division of Consumer Affairs.  In addition to supporting these efforts, she led all programmatic and information technology related aspects of the State's homeland defense solution Emergency Preparedness Information Network (EPINet). Further, she represented the State nationally in numerous forums. The strategy reflected all efforts involving the Office of the Attorney General, NJ State Police, Office of Homeland Security and Preparedness, Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI) efforts, other State Departments, as well as coordinating all efforts deployed to and involving state, county and local emergency service providers throughout the State.

    Melissa Winesburg, PhD

    Director of Programs

    IJIS Institute

    Dr. Melissa Winesburg, Ph.D., holds a Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Winesburg serves as Director of Programs for the IJIS Institute leading efforts related to NIBRS implementation nationally, RMS standards development usage and promulgation and supporting initiatives relating to justice reform nationally. Previously, she held the position of Law Enforcement Practice Director at Optimum Technology, Inc., an information technology corporation located in Columbus, Ohio. Dr. Winesburg managed and led the strategic development and growth of the company?s law enforcement practice in the areas of product development, customer relations and partnerships. Her leadership and expertise expanded law enforcement business operations from one to fourteen states. Ms. Winesburg also led the development of three major products including: SWIFTPROTECT (Records Management System), SWIFTREPOSITORY (NIBRS Repository), and SWIFTCONNECT (Law Enforcement Search Engine). Dr. Winesburg has more than 20 years of experience in law enforcement and criminal justice information systems. She began her career by developing the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) Program and leading the implementation of a standardized records management system for local law enforcement for the State of Ohio.