Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Category
Search by Format
Sort By
Search by Type
Search by Category
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Type
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Contains 29 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A monthly training series geared towards addressing vicarious trauma response across VTRI Community Implementation Site partners.

    A monthly training series geared towards addressing vicarious trauma response across VTRI Community Implementation Site partners.

    Target Audience: Community Implementation Sites

    Overall Objective: A training series hosted by the Vicarious Trauma Response Initiative for all partner organizations across the 12 Community Implementation Sites focusing on mitigating the negative effects of work-related trauma exposure and building partnerships and collaborations to address vicarious trauma response on an organizational level.

    Project Funding Provided By: The Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice

    Includes: Monthly webinars hosted by the Vicarious Trauma Response Initiative 

    Meg Garvin

    Executive Director & Clinical Professor of Law, MA, JD

    National Crime Victim Law Institute

    Meg Garvin is the Executive Director of the National Crime Victim Law Institute (NCVLI) and a Clinical Professor of Law at Lewis & Clark Law School. Ms. Garvin is recognized as a leading expert on victims’ rights. She has testified before Congress, state legislatures and the Judicial Proceedings Panel on Sexual Assault in the Military. In her expert capacity she has served on the Defense Advisory Committee on Investigation, Prosecution and Defense of Sexual Assault in the Armed Forces, the Victims Advisory Group of the United States Sentencing Commission, and the Victim Services Subcommittee, of the Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crime Panel of the United States Department of Defense, as co-chair of the American Bar Association’s Criminal Justice Section Victims Committee, co-chair of the Oregon Attorney General’s Crime Victims’ Rights Task Force and as a member of the Legislative & Public Policy Committee of the Oregon Attorney General’s Sexual Assault Task Force.  She has received numerous awards in recognition of her work, including in 2015 the John W. Gillis Leadership Award from National Parents of Murdered Children; in 2020, the American Bar Association Criminal Justice Section’s Frank Carrington Crime Victim Attorney Award, and in 2021, the Hardy Myers Victim Advocacy Award from the Oregon Crime Victims Law Center. Prior to joining NCVLI, Ms. Garvin practiced law in Minneapolis, Minnesota and clerked for the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Pronouns: she/her/hers. 

    Chris Newlin

    Executive Director, MS LPC

    National Children's Advocacy Center

    Chris Newlin is the executive director of the National Children’s Advocacy Center (NCAC) in Huntsville, AL, where he is responsible for providing leadership and management of the agency, as well as participating in national and international training and leadership activities regarding the protection of children.  The NCAC was the first Children’s Advocacy Center (CAC) in the world and provides child abuse prevention and intervention services in Huntsville/Madison County; and also houses the NCAC Training Center, the Southern Regional Children’s Advocacy Center, the NCAC Virtual Training Center, and the Child Abuse Library Online (CALiO).  The NCAC is a past multi-year winner of the Better Business Bureau’s Torch Award for Workplace Ethics; 2012 Huntsville/Madison County Chamber of Commerce Non-Profit of the Year; 2016 Federal Bureau of Investigation Director’s Community Leadership Award recipient; (multi-year finalist), winner in 2017 and 2019 of the Huntsville/Madison County Chamber of Commerce Best Places to Work; and a Private Sector Member of the Virtual Global Taskforce.  Chris has more than 24 years of experience working in CACs as a forensic interviewervictim advocateclinical director, and executive director. He has provided training in more than 30 countries at numerous international conferences and continues to provide technical assistance on a regular basis to professionals working to develop multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) and CACs throughout the world. Chris received his master’s degree in school psychology from the University of Central Arkansas, is a licensed professional counselor, and has completed coursework at the Harvard University Business School Executive Education Program.

    Paula Gomez Stordy

    Senior Director of National Training and Technical Assistance

    Esperanza United

    Paula Gomez Stordy has more than 25 years of experience working in the field of gender-based violence, of which 17 years were in non-profit management. She is the Senior Director of National Training and Technical Assistance for Esperanza United: National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities, a national resource center with a focus on providing training, research, and policy advocacy to prevent and end domestic violence and sexual assault. Ms. Gomez Stordy directs national training and technical assistance overseeing federal grants, programming, and supervision of staff to enhance culturally responsive approaches and capacity to both mainstream and culturally specific organizations across the country.

    Leo Martinez

    Project Manager

    Esperanza United

    Leo Martinez is a Project Manager with Esperanza United, formerly Casa de Esperanza - National Latin@ Network. With Esperanza United he currently works providing Language Access and Cultural Responsiveness training as part of the national resource center on domestic violence in the Latino community; he is a Training and Technical Assistance lead with the Vicarious Trauma Response Initiative, a national initiative funded by the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) and led by the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP); he informs the Intimate Partner Homicide project focused on Latino victims and funded by the Office on Violence against Women (OVW). He also collaborates on the Enhancing Access Peer to Peer project focused on language access, funded also by the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC). 

  • Contains 26 Product(s)

    Improving officer safety and wellness enhances the health and effectiveness of officers, as well as the safety of the community.

    If you missed the IACP 2022 Officer Safety and Wellness Symposium, it's not too late! Included in this package are some of the most popular workshops, covering topics from resilience to financial wellness. 

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    In this workshop, representatives from the IACP's Mass Violence Advisory Initiative discuss the mass violence incidents that affected their agencies and communities and the unanticipated challenges they faced, both in the immediate aftermath of the event and in the following months.

    Mass violence incidents present unique challenges to law enforcement leaders facing one of these events for the first time. Regardless of how much planning and preparation agencies do ahead of time, the reality is far different. In this workshop, representatives from the IACP's Mass Violence Advisory Initiative discuss the mass violence incidents that affected their agencies and communities and the unanticipated challenges they faced, both in the immediate aftermath of the event, and in the following months. These experts share lessons learned and discuss specific ways their ability to lead in the aftermath of one of these incidents would have been enhanced if they had the guidance of someone who had been through a similar experience. As our experts repeatedly tell us about these incidents, "We didn't know what we didn't know." Also during this workshop, we will introduce the concept of the Mass Violence Peer-to-Peer Advisory Team and share its mission, purpose, and unique value, including how this no-cost service addresses agency, victim, community, and survivors? mental wellbeing as they work to heal following a traumatic mass violence event.

    • Describe the unique factors and conditions that make incidents of mass violence a challenge for law enforcement leaders.
    • Discuss the needs communities have as they strive to heal following an incident of mass violence.
    • Discuss the Mass Violent Peer-to-Peer Advisory Team, its components, and its value to law enforcement and communities following an incident of mass violence.

  • Contains 66 Component(s)

    This project seeks to establish or enhance victim services programs in criminal justice agencies in order to couple law enforcement-based services with community-based program partnerships to serve the broader needs and rights of all crime victims.

    Target Audience: Law Enforcement-Based Victim Services Personnel, Victim Services Supervisors, and Sworn Leadership

    Overall Objective: This project seeks to establish or enhance victim services programs in criminal justice agencies in order to couple law enforcement-based services with community-based program partnerships to serve the broader needs and rights of all crime victims.

    Project Funding Provided by: The Office for Victims of Crime

    Includes: A series of webinars discussing foundational elements of law enforcement-based victim services program development. Sample topics include but are not limited to: victims’ rights, program development, documentation standards, developing partnerships, and program sustainability.

    Please direct any specific questions or comments to LEVproject@theiacp.org

    For more information on Law Enforcement-Based Victim Services click here.

    Emily Burton-Blank

    Project Manager

    IACP



    Heather Dooley

    Project Manager

    IACP

    McKallen Leonard

    Project Manager

    IACP

    Bonnie Mills

    Project Coordinator

    IACP

    Morgana Yellen

    Project Associate

    IACP

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    The "Exploring Locative Technology: What You Need to Know to Address Wandering" is a webinar developed to inform individuals and organizations dedicated to addressing wandering in individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities. This webinar will feature law enforcement, family members, and disability advocates who will speak from personal and professional experience about strategies to address wandering by individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities, as well as the use of locative technology as a last resort.

    During this 60-minute webinar and 30-minute Q&A session, participants will hear from law enforcement, family members, and disability advocates who speak from personal and professional experience about strategies to address wandering by individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities, as well as the use of locative technology as a last resort.

    After this webinar, participants will be able to:
    • Describe multiple strategies to prevent wandering and locate individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities who have wandered;
    • Explain the advantages and disadvantages of using locative or tracking technology to 1) prevent wandering, and 2) locate individuals who have wandered due to their intellectual or developmental disability; and
    • Identify options, including forms of locative technology, for successfully addressing incidents of wandering by individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities.

    Speakers:
    • Officer Laurie Reyes: Coordinator and Creator of the Autism, IDD, Alzheimer’s and Dementia Outreach Unit of the Montgomery County, MD Police Department
    • Sergeant Stefan Bjes (ret.): Sergeant with the Addison, IL Police Department and Parent of two children on the autism spectrum
    • Tauna Szymanski: Founder of CommunicationFIRST, Disabilities Advocate and Parent
    • Russell Lehmann: Award-winning and internationally recognized motivational speaker with lived experience and poet contextualizing autism, mental health, and the overall human condition

    This project is supported by Grant No. 2019-NT-BX-K002 awarded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance. The Bureau of Justice Assistance is a component of the Department of Justice's Office of Justice Programs, which also includes the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, the Office for Victims of Crime, and the SMART Office. Points of view or opinions in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

    Jessica Oppenheim

    Consultant

    The Arc of the United States National Center on Criminal Justice & Disability

    Jessica Oppenheim, Esq. retired as the Director of the Criminal Justice Advocacy Program of The Arc of NJ, in June 2021, a New Jersey statewide program providing advocacy for people with IDD involved in the criminal justice system. Prior to joining The Arc of New Jersey 2010, she was an Assistant Prosecutor in the Middlesex County Prosecutor’s Office and a Deputy Attorney General in the New Jersey Division of Criminal Justice from 1985 – 2010, including overseeing the County Prosecutor’s Offices and 600 law enforcement agencies on behalf of the Attorney General. She prosecuted Megan’s Law and domestic violence cases and provided policies and protocols for law enforcement agencies and prosecutors throughout the State on domestic violence, sexual assault and child abuse, Megan’s Law, and dealing with diverse populations. She is board vice president for Women Aware, Middlesex County’s domestic violence agency, and board president for Legal Reform for Intellectually and Developmentally Disabled people (LRIDD). She has provided training for law enforcement, attorneys, courts, and support providers for people with developmental disabilities and the criminal justice system.

    Officer Laurie Reyes

    Coordinator and Creator of the Autism, IDD, Alzheimer's, and Dementia Outreach Unit

    Montgomery County, MD Police Department

    Officer Laurie Reyes has been a Montgomery County Police officer for 24 years. In 2005, she created and implemented what is now called the Montgomery County Police Autism and Intellectual/Developmental Disabilities (IDD), Alzheimer's, Dementia Outreach Program and has served in this program since that time. Initially, Officer Reyes started the program to address the increase in calls for service involving individuals with Autism and IDD and Alzheimer's who were the focus of a report for a “missing at risk” person. The program has expanded to provide resources way beyond wandering prevention and awareness to include other calls and concerns from the mundane to the very serious.  

    Officer Reyes has received recognition from the White House as a “White House, Champion of Change for Youth and Law Enforcement”. In 2018 she was recognized by the Department of Justice and received the Attorney General’s Award for “Distinguished Service in Policing”. She also received a Governor’s Citation for the creation and continued coordination of the Montgomery County Police Autism/IDD, Alzheimer’s and Dementia Outreach Program. The program is recognized as a national model by such organizations as The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children, Autism Speaks, and Pathfinders for Autism.

    Stefan Bjes

    Sergeant Ret.

    Addison, IL Police Department

    Sergeant Stefan Bjes M.S. is currently the Assistant Director of Campus Safety for North Central College (Naperville, IL) and is a retired patrol sergeant and has served with the Addison, IL Police Department. Stefan has a bachelor’s degree from Valparaiso University in Psychology and Sociology and a master’s degree from Lewis University. He is also a former board member of the DuPage County Juvenile Officer Association. Stefan was named the 2019 Juvenile Officer of the Year by the Illinois Juvenile Officer Association for his work with children with disabilities. In 2021, Stefan was awarded the Missing Children’s Law Enforcement Award by the United States Department of Justice for establishing programs to assist with the prevention and search for missing children with disabilities. Stefan is an instructor for Northeast Multi-Regional Training (NEMRT), Tri-River Police Training Region, and is also an approved instructor regarding autism and intellectual/developmental disabilities for the basic CIT Course with the Illinois Law Enforcement Training and Standards Board.    

    Stefan has written articles for the International Law Enforcement Educators & Trainers Association (ILEETA) Journal, Campus Safety Magazine, and Calibre Press regarding law enforcement interactions with individuals with autism. Stefan is an adjunct faculty member at Waubonsee Community College and the Suburban Law Enforcement Academy at the College of DuPage. He is also the owner of Blue Line Spectrum Safety LLC, which specializes in first responder training regarding autism and developmental disabilities.    

    As a father of two sons with autism, Stefan has extensive experience, through his personal and professional life, in interacting with individuals with autism spectrum disorders.

    Tauna Szymanski

    Founder of CommunicationFIRST, Disabilities Advocate, and Parent

    CommunicationFIRST

    Tauna Szymanski, JD/MPA, is the Executive Director and Legal Director of CommunicationFIRST, the only organization dedicated to representing the rights and interests of the estimated 5 million children and adults in the United States who cannot rely on speech alone to be heard and understood. Before co-founding CommunicationFIRST in 2019, she spent 20 years working in climate change law and policy, mostly at the law firm of Hunton Andrews Kurth LLP, in their Washington, DC, and London offices. Ms. Szymanski is neurodivergent and multiply disabled and parents a child who relies on augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). She received her BA in international relations and environmental studies from Carleton College, her JD from Stanford Law School, and her MPA/MA in economic policy and urban planning from Princeton University's School of Public International Affairs. She grew up mostly outside the United States as the child of US diplomats.

    Russell Lehmann

    Motivational Speaker with Lived Experience and Poet with Lived Experience

    Russell Lehmann is an award-winning and internationally recognized motivational speaker and poet contextualizing autism, mental health, disabilities, and the overall human condition. A graduate of MIT’s “Leadership in the Digital Age” course, Russell sits on the national Board of Directors for The Arc and is a council member for the Autism Society of America.   

    Russell showed signs of autism as a newborn, however, he was not formally diagnosed until the age of 12 after suffering through 5 weeks in a lockdown psychiatric facility.   

    Russell recently returned from Helsinki after he was invited to the Finnish Parliament to discuss government supports that are needed in Finland for individuals on the spectrum. 

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    This presentation discusses the laws surrounding peer support in order to guide teams in their creation, implementation, and maintenance of their own programs.

    This presentation discusses the laws surrounding peer support in order to guide teams in their creation, implementation, and maintenance of their own programs. The presenter uses the laws of the California government code as a model to guide team policies, particularly for those in states that do not currently have peer support legislation. The goal is to have a peer support team that will be able to maintain confidentiality, integrity, and protection from liability or potential litigation.

    • Identify the best practices to implement their team.
    • Define appropriate confidentiality requirements and exceptions.
    • Conduct training that will assist in creating liability protection for their agency, team, and individual supporters.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    As wellness programs evolve and grow across the police profession, it is critical that agencies adapt a broad scope of programmatic elements to support the wellbeing of their officers. Resilience is a key component of wellness and evidence-based practices can be easily integrated into established wellness and peer support programs.

    As wellness programs evolve and grow across the police profession, it is critical that agencies adapt a broad scope of programmatic elements to support the wellbeing of their officers. Resilience is a key component of wellness and evidence-based practices can be easily integrated into established wellness and peer support programs. During this session, attendees will hear from law enforcement leaders on their decision to explore resilience programming for their agencies, why resilience is an important component of wellness, and how agencies can take simple steps to integrate resilience into agency culture, from the academy to regular in-service training.

    • Attendees will learn about evidence-based resilience practices.
    • Attendees will learn how to integrate resilience into agency culture.
    • Attendees will learn strategies to implement resilience practices in academy and in-service training settings.

    Jennifer Styles

    Program Manager

    IACP

    Jennifer Styles is a Program Manager at the International Association of Chiefs of Police. She is an experienced criminal justice grant manager with a strong ability to translate the needs of the field into tangible resources, services, and trainings. Ms. Styles specializes in community-police relations, officer safety and wellness, pretrial justice, volunteer management, emergency preparedness, and tribal and smaller agency issues. Ms. Styles currently oversees IACP’s portfolio of officer safety and wellness work to include the Officer Safety and Wellness Symposium, National Consortium on the Prevention of Law Enforcement Suicide, Innovative Approaches to Officer Safety and Wellness, VALOR Law Enforcement Resilience Training Program, National Peer Support Program for Small and Rural Agencies, and Law Enforcement Family Wellness Training and Technical Assistance Program. 

    Karmen Clay-Tyler, PsyD

    Director of Staff Wellness & Clinical Services

    Cook County Sheriff's Office

    Dr. Karmen Clay-Tyler is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and earned her doctoral degree from the Illinois School of Professional Psychology in 2015. She also has a master’s degree in Forensic Psychology and over 15 years of experience providing mental health services, many of which in the juvenile and adult correctional settings. Her interests shifted from the inmate population to that of law enforcement after noticing the various stressors that co-exist for staff working within these settings. Currently, Dr. Clay-Tyler serves as the Director of Staff Wellness and Clinical Services at the Cook County Sheriff’s Office (Chicago). Her career with the sheriff’s office began in 2017 with the Department of Corrections (Cook County Jail) where she served as a Director within the Inmate Programs and Services Department. In 2019, she was selected to join the Bureau of Human Resources as the sheriff’s office aimed to identify additional programs and resources to better support and promote staff wellness. To date, she is working alongside colleagues on the launch of a formal staff wellness unit. She is also a course instructor within the training academy and facilitates mental health trainings for sheriff’s office police recruits. Dr. Clay-Tyler is a member of the American Psychological Association (APA), the APA Division 18 Psychologists in Public Service, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), and the Society for Police and Criminal Psychology (SPCP). She is also a co-author of Pandemic, Protests, and Purpose: Police Psychology in a Time of Great Need (2020) and studied the Psychological Characteristics of Police Officers Referred for Multiple Fitness for Duty Evaluations (2015) in completion of her Clinical Research Project. Her professional interests include the completion of Pre-Employment and Fitness for Duty Evaluations. She also hopes to seek board certification in Police and Public Safety Psychology within the near future.

    Richard Creamer

    Sergeant

    Norfolk, Virginia, Police Department

    Sergeant Rich Creamer is a 20-year veteran of the Norfolk Police Department and is currently assigned to the Norfolk Police Department's Training Division, where he is responsible for the development, maintenance, and instruction of courses related to Critical Incident Stress Management and Peer Support. Sergeant Creamer also provides CISM/Peer Support services to the Norfolk Police Department as well as other emergency services agencies throughout the region while developing an evolving-based vision and mission for the Norfolk Police Department to reflect trends in public safety mental health and wellness. Sgt. Creamer currently works with the International Association of Chiefs of Police and University of Penn in the development and delivery of VALOR- Resiliency in Law Enforcement curriculum. Prior to his current assignment, Sgt. Creamer held a leadership position in the Criminal Intelligence Unit and has extensive experience in violent crime investigations and criminal street gangs. Sergeant Creamer holds both a Bachelor's degree from Old Dominion University in Sociology and a Master's degree from Liberty University in Human Services Counseling.  

    Chelley Seibert, MEd

    Training and Community Engagement Coordinator

    Dayton Police Department

    Chelley Seibert is the Training and Community Engagement Coordinator with the Dayton Police Department. She assists newly graduated police recruits in their first year transition to police officer. She monitors their work/life balance and measures their job burnout rate. Chelley is a retired Dayton Police Officer after 25 years of service. Her assignments included Patrol, Crime Prevention Specialist, Public Information Officer, Academy Instructor and Training Coordinator. She is a Diversity Instructor, Certified Physical Fitness Instructor and Subject Matter Expert in Instructor Skills Development thru the State of Ohio. Chelley was the first female recruit in Dayton Police history to be awarded the Top Firearms Award (“Top Gun”) and was named the Dayton Police Officer of the Year in 2011. Chelley was a speaker at the TEDxDayton in 2015, and the WINxChicago Law Enforcement event in 2016. She currently serves as a speaker coach for TEDxDayton Speakers Committee. She has also presented both locally and nationally in universities, police academies, hospitals, churches and at the International Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association (ILEETA). Chelley received her Bachelors Degree in Music Education from Miami University and Master of Education Degree – School Counseling from Wright State University. She is currently enrolled in the Master of Science Clinical Counseling program starting this fall. In addition, Chelley is a drummer in the band Frozen Feet of Dayton. She has served as a choir director for the TRU Choir in Cincinnati, is a member of the World House Choir in Yellow Springs and a singer/songwriter/keynote speaker in the Positive Music Industry. She was also a member of the World Champion Garfield Cadets Drum and Bugle Corps. She has completed several marathons, including running up Pikes Peak, and has competed as a distance runner in both the Ohio and International Police and Fire Olympics.

    Eric Tobin

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    This presentation explores the role spiritual wellness plays in following basic principles of integrity, values, ethics, and morals, and discusses various aspects of being spiritually well and its critical role in officer wellness.

    Amidst the growing conversation around officer wellness, spiritual wellness is often left out. The stressful and frequently dangerous nature of the job places a burden on officers that most people never endure. Law enforcement is regularly called upon to deal with hurting and distressed citizens, which can lead to a negative perception of the world. This, coupled with the COVID crisis, public demand for services, declining resources, and a critical atmosphere, has placed increased pressure on officers and their families. This presentation explores the role spiritual wellness plays in following basic principles of integrity, values, ethics, and morals, and discusses various aspects of being spiritually well and its critical role in officer wellness.

    • Participants will identify various aspects of spirituality that include but are not limited to religion.
    • Through real-life examples, participants will see the valuable role of spiritual wellness in officer health and wellness.
    • Participants will understand the broad definition of spiritual wellness and the many aspects of being spiritual.

    Iva Rody, M.A.

    Associate Director

    National Center For Prevention of Community Violence

    Throughout her career, Iva Rody has continued to serve as an advocate in both the government and private sectors. Mrs. Rody has a Bachelor of Science in Administration of Justice, a Master of Administration and has been successful at developing and implementing multiple law enforcement-based and community programs. Often, Mrs. Rody is called upon to provide training and professional development on current trends and best practices in Officer Wellness, Mental Health, Domestic Violence, Crisis Intervention, and Advocacy. She is a graduate of the Arizona POST Leadership Program and serves as a committee member for the International Association of Chiefs of Police Victim Services Committee, the National Center for Prevention of Community Violence and the Federal Bureau of Investigations ELEVATE Committee. Ms. Rody serves as faculty at Arizona State University, has extensive experience in program management, and serves as a peer reviewer for the US Department of Justice. Ms. Rody has been recognized by the Arizona Attorney General for Distinguished Service in recognition of Outstanding Leadership and the IACP Excellence in Victim Services Award. In her role, Ms. Rody regularly leads solutions-based programming for the nation's first responder community where she emphasizes the importance of holistic wellness for public safety personnel and their families. Ms. Rody often engages innovative technology to promote access to critical resources that improve and support those she serves.

    Bobby Kipper

    Executive Director/Retired Police Officer

    National Center for Prevention of Community Violence

    Bobby Kipper is a Wall Street Journal and USA Today Bestselling author with over four decades of experience in both the public and private sector. Bobby's journey began with a successful twenty-six-year career with the Newport News Virginia Police Department. Following his local law enforcement service, he served as the Director of the Gang Reduction Program for the Office of the Attorney General of Virginia for 4 years. In addition, he served as a school safety and discipline specialist with the Virginia Department of Education for 4 years. He went on to start a successful national consulting company focusing on training and technical assistance for both public and private industry. In 2009 Bobby founded the National Center for Prevention of Community Violence which currently serves communities and schools across America in an effort to interrupt the process of violence through proven solutions. Bobby's efforts have been recognized by local, state, and national leaders for his consistent approach to positive community change at the public and private levels. He has been awarded the FBI Director’s award for the Fight Against Crime in America as well as he was recognized for Outstanding Contribution to Law Enforcement on three separate occasions. His work has been featured on: CSPAN, National Public Radio, Fox News Network, MSNBC, USA Today, the Wall Street Journal and a number of local and regional media outlets. Bobby has served as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Memphis and the University of North Florida. He is called to provide keynote and conference presentations both nationally and internationally and his current bestselling book “Performance Driven Thinking” is being highlighted as a pathway for improving performance in public and private organizations across America.
  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Learn how leaders can inadvertently worsen or aggravate trauma within their ranks, and how they can serve as trauma-informed change agents, help save the lives of officers, and lead the way towards healing and post-traumatic growth.

    Law enforcement professionals are exposed to very high levels of trauma, uniquely different from what people outside the profession experience. Attendees will learn how trauma impacts police work, how officers and their families are affected by trauma, and how to become a trauma-informed leader. Learn how leaders can inadvertently worsen or aggravate trauma within their ranks, and how they can serve as trauma-informed change agents, help save the lives of officers, and lead the way towards healing and post-traumatic growth. Attendees are provided solution-focused roadmaps for trauma-informed police leadership, including how trauma-informed leadership is a vital source of strength, stability, and support during extremely difficult and challenging times.

    • Describe three key features of strong trauma-informed leadership for law enforcement professionals.
    • Identify three key pitfalls to avoid in trauma-informed police leadership.
    • Understand the impact of trauma on police and how to transform that impact into opportunities for growth.

    David Black, Chief Psychologist California Police Chiefs Assoc. Wellness Committee / Ph.D. Clinical Psychology / Licensed Psychologist (CA)

    CEO and Chief Psychologist

    CORDICO

    Dr. David Black is the Founder and CEO of CORDICO, serving hundreds of law enforcement agencies nationally. He is the Chief Psychologist of the California Police Chiefs Association Wellness Committee, and a Founding Board Member of the National Sheriffs Association Psychological Services Group. Dr. Black is also an Advisory Board Member for the National Police Foundation’s Center for Mass Violence Response Studies, serves on the IACP Police Psychological Services Ethics Committee, serves on the National Fraternal Order of Police Officer Wellness Committee and Provider Evaluation Subcomittee, and is an Officer Wellness subject matter expert for the California Commission on POST. Dr. Black has been serving law enforcement since 2002.

    Neil Gang

    Chief of Police

    Pinole, California, Police Department

    Police Chief Neil H. Gang has served in law enforcement for over 32 years and has been the Chief of Police for the Pinole Police Department since 2014. He is the Chair of the California Police Chiefs Association Officer Wellness and Resiliency Committee, the author of the Asher Model-7 Point Approach to a Culture of Wellness, the host of the 6th Pillar Podcast and was named Public Safety Hero of the Year by the House of representatives in 2020.

    His innovative work as a law enforcement leader has been featured by the IACP in Police Chief magazine. He is the graduate of the prestigious Northwestern School of Police Staff Command, where he was both the president of the class and the recipient of the Franklin M. Kremel Award for excellence in the field of leadership.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    The purpose of the program was to help officers improve their nutritional knowledge and learn healthier eating habits, especially as they handle stressful calls, long hours, varying shifts, and overall cumulative stress.

    The holistic wellness program, STEPP, is based on the concept that overall wellness should encompass all facets of our lives. The acronym STEPP includes: Support Systems, Tactical Knowledge & Skills, Emotional Well-being, Physical Health and Personal & Financial Stability. One of the biggest obstacles first responders face is maintaining healthy nutritional habits. The Miami Beach Police Department in Florida was awarded a grant to create a six month nutrition pilot program. The purpose of the program was to help officers improve their nutritional knowledge and learn healthier eating habits, especially as they handle stressful calls, long hours, varying shifts and overall cumulative stress. Goal was to assess and evaluate this program in order to create a departmental nutrition program that could be combined with a physical fitness program.

    • Upon completion, the participant will be able to define the purpose of a nutrition program and why it is necessary for first responders.
    • Upon completion, the participant will be able to demonstrate how nutritional knowledge and healthy eating behaviors can be implemented in your wellness program designed to improve physical health.
    • Upon completion, the participant will be able to list the steps their department would need to take to implement a successful nutrition program ? including research, selection, implementation, cost analysis and evaluation.

    Elise S. Taylor, PsyD

    Lieutenant/Clinical Psychologist Training Unit

    Miami Beach, Florida, Police Department

    Lieutenant Elise Spina Taylor is a 25-year veteran of the City of Miami Beach Police Department. While working full-time for the police department, Elise completed her Doctorate degree in Clinical Psychology and obtained her Florida License, in 2008. Currently she is the Commander of the Training Unit and Hostage Negotiations Team, the Psychology Consultant and administrator of the Peer Support Team and Department Wellness Program. Elise has over 17 years of investigative experience, working assignments in the Criminal Investigative Division (CID) - Property Crimes and the Homicide - Major Crimes Unit. She later returned to CID at the rank of Lieutenant and was assigned to the Street Crimes Unit, which includes Robbery, Narcotics, Human Trafficking and the Crime Suppression Team. When Elise was promoted to the rank of Sergeant, she was assigned to the Entertainment District - Ocean Drive Squad and then was assigned to the Internal Affairs Unit. Prior to joining the Police Department, Elise was an English teacher and school counselor in the Miami-Dade public school system. Her education and experience have been a great foundation in managing the department wellness and training programs.

    Noel Castillo, PhD

    Officer/Training Unit

    Miami Beach, Florida, Police Department

    Ofc. Noel A. Castillo has worked in the law enforcement/correctional field for the past twenty-five years. As a police officer with a sound academic background, he has conducted and assisted with research in the areas of body worn cameras, officer wellness, use of force and juvenile issues. Noel has received awards for his work as a Hostage Negotiator, Training Officer and for the implementation of community outreach programs. Noel has a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice from Florida International University, Master of Public Administration from Barry University, and a PhD in Criminal Justice from Nova Southeastern University. He is a US Army veteran.