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  • Contains 64 Component(s)

    This project seeks to establish or enhance victim services programs in criminal justice agencies in order to couple law enforcement-based services with community-based program partnerships to serve the broader needs and rights of all crime victims.

    Target Audience: Law Enforcement-Based Victim Services Personnel, Victim Services Supervisors, and Sworn Leadership

    Overall Objective: This project seeks to establish or enhance victim services programs in criminal justice agencies in order to couple law enforcement-based services with community-based program partnerships to serve the broader needs and rights of all crime victims.

    Project Funding Provided by: The Office for Victims of Crime

    Includes: A series of webinars discussing foundational elements of law enforcement-based victim services program development. Sample topics include but are not limited to: victims’ rights, program development, documentation standards, developing partnerships, and program sustainability.

    Please direct any specific questions or comments to LEVproject@theiacp.org

    For more information on Law Enforcement-Based Victim Services click here.

    Emily Burton-Blank

    Project Manager

    IACP



    Heather Dooley

    Project Manager

    IACP

    McKallen Leonard

    Project Manager

    IACP

    Bonnie Mills

    Project Coordinator

    IACP

    Morgana Yellen

    Project Associate

    IACP

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Recording of a 90-minute webinar discussing the available resources provided by The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC).

    Target Audience: Law enforcement personnel & community service providers Overall Objective: Staff from the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children will highlight all the free resources available when NCMEC is engaged on missing and exploited child cases. Presenters will also discuss online safety for children and the increased risk factors for children on the autism spectrum. NCMEC’s mission is to help find missing children, reduce child sexual exploitation, and prevent child victimization. NCMEC works with families, victims, private industry, law enforcement, and the public to assist with preventing child abductions, recovering missing children, and providing services to deter and combat child sexual exploitation.

    Joy Paluska

    Program Manager

    National Center For Missing & Exploited Children

    Joy Paluska joined the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children in 2019 as a Program Manager in the Missing Children Division. In this role, she supports the Disaster Preparedness and Response Program and other special projects related to children on the autism spectrum, children of color, and Indigenous children. Between 2010-2018, Joy served as a civil servant within the Executive Office of the President. Prior to that, she worked in disaster recovery with both FEMA and the American Red Cross. Joy began her career at the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights and following that worked as an attorney for Legal Aid and in private practice in her home state of Illinois. Joy is a graduate of the University of Iowa and the City University of New York School of Law at Queens College.

    Leemie Kahng-Sofer

    Director

    National Center For Missing & Exploited Children

    Leemie Kahng-Sofer has been with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) since 2009. She currently serves as the Director of Case Management within the Missing Children Division (MCD) where she oversees staff members who provide assistance to law enforcement, families and child welfare officials. In 2020, her division provided assistance in almost 30,000 new reports of missing children. Her duties include management responsibilities at NCMEC headquarters in Alexandria, VA, as well as NCMEC’s regional offices located in Lake Park, FL, Rochester, NY and Austin, TX. She is also responsible for major MCD initiatives such as the development of the Division’s enterprise application and other specialty topics related to children missing from care, child sex trafficking, online enticement, and children on the autism spectrum. In addition, she has presented to law enforcement and other agencies all over the United States on issues related to missing children and NCMEC’s programs and capabilities.

    Prior to joining NCMEC, Ms. Kahng-Sofer served as a prosecutor with the Manhattan District Attorney's Office in New York City where she investigated and prosecuted cases ranging from white-collar to violent crimes. She specialized in Asian gang extortion and kidnapping cases, and adult sex crimes cases. She later served as the Deputy Director of Legal Training as well as Deputy Chief of the Sex Crimes Prosecution Unit. She has authored two chapters of a judicial bench book for the State of Pennsylvania covering Pennsylvania criminal statutes designed to protect children and protect the public from sexual offenders. Leemie Kahng-Sofer graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Wellesley College and received her Juris Doctor from Cornell University Law School.

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    Untangling Survivor Engagement: Promoting Comprehensive Collaboration is a resource developed to teach organizations how to strengthen collaboration with human trafficking survivors by considering them as experts with lived experience. This webinar will highlight: the importance of data-driven decisions and how collaborating with survivors can enhance this practice; the continuum of survivorship; and how survivors can help in navigating tough conversations.

    Effective collaboration with experts who have lived experience contributes to a sustainable community-wide response to human trafficking. The discussion will focus on how survivors can help in navigating tough conversations, as well as creating space for shared learning across multidisciplinary teams. 

    Target Audience: Law enforcement, prosecutors, victim service providers, and multidisciplinary anti-human trafficking task forces

    Overall Objectives: This webinar will help participants to: articulate the historical context of survivor involvement in the anti-human trafficking movement over the last 20 years and how it has improved the response to trafficking; assess their anti-human trafficking task force’s existing involvement with survivors; expand roles and expectations for multidisciplinary approaches that include partners with lived experience; and implement effective strategies with partners who have lived experience to build and maintain a successful community response to human trafficking.

    Project Funding Provided By: This product is supported by the International Association of Chiefs of Police under 2020-VT-BX-K002 awarded by the Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this product are those of the contributors and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

    Includes: A webinar presented by: Aubrey Lloyd, LCSW, Senior Project Manager, ICF; Caridad Mas-Batchelor, Special Projects Administrator, Miami-Dade Police Department, Task Force Coordinator, South Florida Human Trafficking Task Force; and Alicia Alcaraz, Project Coordinator, IACP (Moderator) 

    To learn more about IACP’s anti-human trafficking resources, go to the https://www.theiacp.org/projec... .

    Aubrey Lloyd, MSW, LCSW

    Senior Project Manager

    ICF

    Aubrey Lloyd is a Senior Project Manager overseeing work specific to human trafficking at ICF. She has 21 years of nonprofit experience working with populations affected by domestic violence, substance use, mental health, and complex and historical trauma. This experience focused on delivering training; creating and maintaining community partnerships, trauma informed programs, and curricula; and directing programs. For the past 14 years, she has designed and implemented programs for multidisciplinary teams and nongovernmental and community-based organizations using her subject matter expertise in: human trafficking; trauma-informed victim assistance programming; the connection between other crime and vulnerability sectors such as addiction, interpersonal violence, housing insecurities; and early childhood adverse conditions and the impact on developmental trauma.

    Ms. Lloyd has worked at the state level to coordinate identification and service delivery for victims, as well as developing a state-accredited, trauma-informed educational curriculum and trauma-informed group home model structure for minor victims of human trafficking. She has used this knowledge with hundreds of grantees funded through the Department of Justice, to formulate foundations for effective and sustainable human trafficking programming, utilize data to craft evaluative and evidence-based interventions, provide subject matter expertise in maintaining multi-disciplinary partnerships, and guidance to cement the importance of trauma-informed and implemented service practices. Ms. Lloyd also brings the invaluable perspective of a survivor-advocate

    Caridad Mas-Batchelor, LL.M

    Task Force Coordinator

    South Florida Human Trafficking Task Force

    Caridad Mas-Batchelor is a Special Projects Administrator for Miami-Dade Police Department. Under this role, Ms. Mas-Batchelor serves as the Task Force Coordinator for the South Florida Human Trafficking Task Force. In her role as Task Force Coordinator, Ms. Mas-Batchelor oversees the over 400-member task force federally funded by the Office for Victims of Crime. Ms. Mas-Batchelor provides training and conducts outreach to increase awareness and identification of human trafficking survivors. Ms. Mas-Batchelor has also provided national and international technical assistance to other Task Forces and to international leaders from Albania, Gabon, Kazakhstan, Qatar, Central African Republic, Japan, Mexico, and Spain.

    Currently, Ms. Mas- Batchelor is also a Task Force Personnel with Homeland Security Investigations’ (HSI) Human Trafficking Group based out of Miami. She provides on-going support to the HSI Human Trafficking Group as it pertains to victim-centered best practices. She also serves as a liaison between federal and local law enforcement. Previously, she served as the Interim Deputy Director for the International Rescue Committee Miami office. Caridad holds a master’s degree in Criminal Justice from Florida International University and a Master’s in Law in Intercultural Human Rights from St. Thomas University School of Law

    Alicia Alcaraz (Moderator)

    Project Coordinator

    IACP

    Alicia Alcaraz is a Project Coordinator on the Programs team of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), where she currently works on the OVC Enhanced Collaborative Model (ECM) Human Trafficking Task Force Training and Technical Assistance (TTA) Program to support the needs of ECM anti-human trafficking task forces. She is also the community manager for Task Force Connect, the online peer-to-peer sharing community exclusively for DOJ-funded ECM Human Trafficking Task Forces.

    Before joining the IACP, Ms. Alcaraz served as a Hotline Advocate at Polaris’s National Human Trafficking Hotline. In that role, she provided support to multiple persons who were labor and sex trafficked and their families and friends. She also worked with partnering organizations (such as local service providers and law enforcement) to assist persons who have been labor and sex trafficked. Before that, Ms. Alcaraz studied Psychology and Global Service at Valparaiso University in Valparaiso, IN. Since high school, she has had a passion for helping persons who have been labor and sex trafficked.

  • Contains 25 Component(s), Includes Credits

    A monthly training series geared towards addressing vicarious trauma response across VTRI Community Implementation Site partners.

    A monthly training series geared towards addressing vicarious trauma response across VTRI Community Implementation Site partners.

    Target Audience: Community Implementation Sites

    Overall Objective: A training series hosted by the Vicarious Trauma Response Initiative for all partner organizations across the 12 Community Implementation Sites focusing on mitigating the negative effects of work-related trauma exposure and building partnerships and collaborations to address vicarious trauma response on an organizational level.

    Project Funding Provided By: The Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice

    Includes: Monthly webinars hosted by the Vicarious Trauma Response Initiative 

    Meg Garvin

    Executive Director & Clinical Professor of Law, MA, JD

    National Crime Victim Law Institute

    Meg Garvin is the Executive Director of the National Crime Victim Law Institute (NCVLI) and a Clinical Professor of Law at Lewis & Clark Law School. Ms. Garvin is recognized as a leading expert on victims’ rights. She has testified before Congress, state legislatures and the Judicial Proceedings Panel on Sexual Assault in the Military. In her expert capacity she has served on the Defense Advisory Committee on Investigation, Prosecution and Defense of Sexual Assault in the Armed Forces, the Victims Advisory Group of the United States Sentencing Commission, and the Victim Services Subcommittee, of the Response Systems to Adult Sexual Assault Crime Panel of the United States Department of Defense, as co-chair of the American Bar Association’s Criminal Justice Section Victims Committee, co-chair of the Oregon Attorney General’s Crime Victims’ Rights Task Force and as a member of the Legislative & Public Policy Committee of the Oregon Attorney General’s Sexual Assault Task Force.  She has received numerous awards in recognition of her work, including in 2015 the John W. Gillis Leadership Award from National Parents of Murdered Children; in 2020, the American Bar Association Criminal Justice Section’s Frank Carrington Crime Victim Attorney Award, and in 2021, the Hardy Myers Victim Advocacy Award from the Oregon Crime Victims Law Center. Prior to joining NCVLI, Ms. Garvin practiced law in Minneapolis, Minnesota and clerked for the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals. Pronouns: she/her/hers. 

    Chris Newlin

    Executive Director, MS LPC

    National Children's Advocacy Center

    Chris Newlin is the executive director of the National Children’s Advocacy Center (NCAC) in Huntsville, AL, where he is responsible for providing leadership and management of the agency, as well as participating in national and international training and leadership activities regarding the protection of children.  The NCAC was the first Children’s Advocacy Center (CAC) in the world and provides child abuse prevention and intervention services in Huntsville/Madison County; and also houses the NCAC Training Center, the Southern Regional Children’s Advocacy Center, the NCAC Virtual Training Center, and the Child Abuse Library Online (CALiO).  The NCAC is a past multi-year winner of the Better Business Bureau’s Torch Award for Workplace Ethics; 2012 Huntsville/Madison County Chamber of Commerce Non-Profit of the Year; 2016 Federal Bureau of Investigation Director’s Community Leadership Award recipient; (multi-year finalist), winner in 2017 and 2019 of the Huntsville/Madison County Chamber of Commerce Best Places to Work; and a Private Sector Member of the Virtual Global Taskforce.  Chris has more than 24 years of experience working in CACs as a forensic interviewervictim advocateclinical director, and executive director. He has provided training in more than 30 countries at numerous international conferences and continues to provide technical assistance on a regular basis to professionals working to develop multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) and CACs throughout the world. Chris received his master’s degree in school psychology from the University of Central Arkansas, is a licensed professional counselor, and has completed coursework at the Harvard University Business School Executive Education Program.

    Paula Gomez Stordy

    Senior Director of National Training and Technical Assistance

    Esperanza United

    Paula Gomez Stordy has more than 25 years of experience working in the field of gender-based violence, of which 17 years were in non-profit management. She is the Senior Director of National Training and Technical Assistance for Esperanza United: National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities, a national resource center with a focus on providing training, research, and policy advocacy to prevent and end domestic violence and sexual assault. Ms. Gomez Stordy directs national training and technical assistance overseeing federal grants, programming, and supervision of staff to enhance culturally responsive approaches and capacity to both mainstream and culturally specific organizations across the country.

    Leo Martinez

    Project Manager

    Esperanza United

    Leo Martinez is a Project Manager with Esperanza United, formerly Casa de Esperanza - National Latin@ Network. With Esperanza United he currently works providing Language Access and Cultural Responsiveness training as part of the national resource center on domestic violence in the Latino community; he is a Training and Technical Assistance lead with the Vicarious Trauma Response Initiative, a national initiative funded by the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) and led by the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP); he informs the Intimate Partner Homicide project focused on Latino victims and funded by the Office on Violence against Women (OVW). He also collaborates on the Enhancing Access Peer to Peer project focused on language access, funded also by the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC). 

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    This panel provided perspectives from smaller, rural serving, and statewide agencies who have sought assistance from the COPS Office premier technical assistance center (CRI-TAC). CRI-TAC provides customized technical assistance for law enforcement agencies seeking to enhance their implementation strategies and programs to meet the needs of the field.

    Law enforcement agencies across the country are encountering challenges in recruitment, hiring, retention, and training. Small agencies can be an incubator for innovation, agencies serving rural communities must reimagine services, and statewide agencies seek to meet fluctuating demands within dispersed geographic regions. Agencies of all types are challenging the status quo through implementing creative and flexible solutions. This panel provided perspectives from smaller, rural serving, and statewide agencies who have sought assistance from the COPS Office premier technical assistance center (CRI-TAC). CRI-TAC provides customized technical assistance for law enforcement agencies seeking to enhance their implementation strategies and programs to meet the needs of the field.

    • Describe barriers to effective recruitment, hiring and retention strategies.
    • Recognize strategies to diversify recruitment and hiring efforts.
    • Identify lessons learned from recruitment, hiring, and retention challenges and successes.

    Nazmia Comrie

    Senior Program Specialist, COPS Office

    Nazmia E.A. Comrie is a senior program specialist in the Resources and Technical Assistance (RTA) division at the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office). Nazmia provides leadership for the development, implementation, and delivery of technical assistance efforts to state, local, tribal, and campus law enforcement agencies across the county as the program manager for the Collaborative Reform Initiative. She is an issue manager for issues related to human trafficking, hate crimes, interpersonal violence, and mass demonstrations, and has expertise in officer wellness and safety and youth safety. To date Nazmia has authored and coauthored a number of publications relevant to her areas of expertise and the criminal justice field as a whole, including Building Stronger, Safer Communities: A guide for law enforcement and community partners to prevent and respond to hate crimes. In addition Nazmia was a significant contributor to the After-Action Assessment of the Police Response to the August 2014 Demonstrations in Ferguson, Missouri report that was released in 2015. Nazmia received her bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of Rochester and her master's degree in criminal justice from University at Albany, where she worked on research involving homicides, wrongful convictions, community policing, and gangs. 

    John Batiste

    Chief

    Chief John R. Batiste is the 21st Chief of the Washington State Patrol originally appointed in 2005. On January 16, 2017, Governor Jay Inslee reappointed Chief Batiste to continue to lead the Washington State Patrol. He oversees the day-to-day operations and manages the agency?s six bureaus: Commercial Vehicle Enforcement, Field Operations, Fire Protection, Forensic Laboratory Services, Investigative Services, and Technical Services. Chief Batiste began his career with the Washington State Patrol in March 1976. He has promoted through the ranks of sergeant, lieutenant, captain, and deputy chief. Chief Batiste obtained his Bachelor?s Degree in Law Enforcement Administration from City University and is a graduate of Northwestern University?s Center for Public Safety School and Police Staff and Command, as well as a graduate of the Federal Bureau of Investigation?s National Executive Institute. Chief Batiste has been involved in a variety of activities and organizations to numerous to name, participating as an Executive Board Member for many boards and organizations.

    Jeff Caponera

    Chief

    Grafton, WI, Police Department

    Chief Caponera is a 26-year law enforcement professional. He retired as Chief of Police from the City of Anna, Texas Police Department in August 2020 after serving the Anna community for over 12 years. He currently serves as the Chief of Police for the Grafton, Wisconsin Police Department. Chief Caponera graduated Summa Cum Laude from Regis University in Denver, Colorado with a BS in Public Administration. He is a graduate of the FBI National Academy, Session 276 and the 53rd Session of the Institute for Law Enforcement Administration?s School of Executive Leadership. Chief Caponera?s certifications include instructor, crisis negotiator, field training officer and supervisor, master peace officer (Texas) and grant writer. Chief Caponera is an active member of the FBI National Academy Associates (Wisconsin Chapter). He was a member of the North Central Texas Council of Governments Criminal Justice Policy Development Committee, representing Anna and Collin County, Texas. Chief Caponera currently represents the Wisconsin Police Chiefs Association as an advisory board member for the Wisconsin Department of Justice?s Committee on Elder Abuse.

    Laura Wilt

    Program Manager

    IACP

    Laura Wilt is a Program Manager on the IACP Programs Team currently responsible for overseeing the successful delivery of all training and technical assistance activities of the Collaborative Reform Initiative Technical Assistance Center (CRI-TAC) to agencies across the nation. Since joining the IACP eight years ago, Laura has worked on the IACP Programs and IACP Member Engagement Teams focused on the implementation and delivery of projects, training, and technical assistance initiatives aimed at providing practical tools, education, and support to the policing field. Areas of focus in her portfolio of work have included victim services, trauma-informed training, officer safety and wellness, multi-collaborative partnerships, juvenile justice, community-police relations, women in law enforcement, and leadership. She has supported federal grant awards from diverse funders including OJJDP, OVC, and the COPS Office. Before becoming a team member with the IACP, Laura served as Crisis Manager and Training Coordinator at the Arlington, VA based non-profit, CrisisLink, centered on crisis intervention and suicide prevention.  

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    This conference workshop discussed current impediments to officer wellness across the profession and actionable steps of the Oscar Kilo implementation process prepares attendees to develop a scalable model to promote personal resiliency framework for all officers.

    Policing is proven to be a high trauma, high fatigue, and high stress job and all these experiences are known to affect our mental health. Police culture suppresses the conversation with a "be strong" mentality that stigmatizes those who seek help. Stress arising from public scrutiny on social media is compounded by a feeling that the public is against the police profession and exacerbated by low levels of internal trust about fair treatment. This can lead to a withdrawal of discretionary effort, impede effective decision making, and negatively influence and officer's performance professional and personal life. Oscar Kilo, U.K. National Police Wellbeing Service, was established to provide evidence-based research and resources for effective wellbeing service delivery and collaboration across emergency service providers. This conference workshop discussed current impediments to officer wellness across the profession and actionable steps of the Oscar Kilo implementation process prepares attendees to develop a scalable model to promote personal resiliency framework for all officers.

    • Identifying wellness needs of first-line officers and how agency leaders can address individual needs with a systems approach.
    • Understanding of established effective evidence-based wellness service models.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    This conference workshop hosted a conversation with Philip Mudd, current CNN counterterrorism analyst and former deputy director of the Counterterrorist Center at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the first deputy director for the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) national security branch, and later the FBI's senior intelligence advisor, as he discusses the evolving counterterrorism threat.

    This conference workshop hosted a conversation with Philip Mudd, current CNN counterterrorism analyst and former deputy director of the Counterterrorist Center at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the first deputy director for the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) national security branch, and later the FBI's senior intelligence advisor, as he discusses the evolving counterterrorism threat. The discussions will include how some of the pivotal global and domestic terrorism events have evolved from 9/11 to present day, the lessons learned from these events and how we prepare to combat these threats moving forward.

  • Contains 33 Product(s)

    Did you miss the IACP 2021 Annual Conference? It's not too late! There are two ways to access some of the most popular workshops from the event:

    If you missed the IACP 2021 Annual Conference, it's not too late! Included in this package are 33 of our most popular workshops, covering topics from de-escalation to global money laundering. 

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    An expert panel discusses lessons learned, leading practices and cutting-edge approaches that can assist agencies in dealing with unplanned critical incidents and identify steps that police leaders can be taken before, during, and after an event that can keep an incident from becoming a crisis.

    An expert panel discussed lessons learned, leading practices, and cutting-edge approaches that can assist agencies in dealing with unplanned critical incidents and identify steps that police leaders can be taken before, during, and after an event that can keep an incident from becoming a crisis.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    A conversation hosted by IACP's past president Cynthia Renaud with three top media representatives. This conversation assists law enforcement in gaining the perspective of news media in breaking-news situations.

    A conversation hosted by IACP's past president Cynthia Renaud with three top media representatives. This conversation assists law enforcement in gaining the perspective of news media in breaking-news situations.

    Cynthia Renaud

    IACP President, Chief of Police (Ret.), Santa Monica, California, Police Department

    After spending nearly three decades in local law enforcement, Cynthia Renaud retired as Chief of Police from the Santa Monica Police Department in October 2020.  Prior to this agency, she served as chief of the Folsom Police Department in Sacramento county for seven years, and prior to that, the Long Beach Police Department in Los Angeles County for twenty years, leaving that agency at the rank of commander.  She is currently the president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the world’s largest and most influential professional association for police leaders with over 31,000 members across 165 countries worldwide. 

    Chief Renaud spent many years working uniformed patrol assignments and special investigations positions. Along with serving as chief in two agencies, her supervisory positions included Internal Affairs, the Field Training Program, Academy Director, Patrol Watch Commander, Communications Division Commander, Patrol Division Commander, and Investigations Division Commander. 

    Chief Renaud is a native of Long Beach. She attended California State University, Long Beach, where she completed a Bachelor’s Degree in English Literature in 1996 and a Master’s Degree in English Literature in 2000.  In 2010, she completed a second Master’s Degree in National Security Studies at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey.  Chief Renaud received the Outstanding Thesis Award for her thesis submissions in both graduate programs.

    Luke Barr

    Jack Date

    Geneva Sands