image

View Individual 2021 Officer Safety and Wellness Workshops and Activities

 

Search by Category
Search by Format
Sort By
  • Contains 61 Product(s)

    ​Purchase the 2021 Officer Safety and Wellness Symposium Workshops and Activities Package ($150 for IACP members and $200 for non-members) and gain access to the 50+ available workshops and activities.

    Purchase the 2021 Officer Safety and Wellness Symposium Workshops and Activities Package ($150 for IACP members and $200 for non-members) and gain access to the 50+ available workshops and activities.

    View the IACP 2021 Officer Safety and Wellness Symposium homepage. 

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    This conference workshop presentation provides a clear understanding of Vicarious Trauma (VT), how it manifests, and the potential impacts on police agencies as experienced by the Great Falls, Montana, Police Department (GFPD).

    This conference workshop presentation provides a clear understanding of Vicarious Trauma (VT), how it manifests, and the potential impacts on police agencies as experienced by the Great Falls, Montana, Police Department (GFPD). This workshop covers an officer's journey, this agency's strategy and 3-pronged approach, crisis intervention techniques, the importance of a peer support program and community collaborations, along with an introduction to the Vicarious Trauma Toolkit and how the GFPD utilizes it. VT, in the form of both single incident and chronic trauma exposure, continues to affect police agencies and impact individual officers, organizations, and the communities they serve. Yet many jurisdictions are unsure of the necessary steps to mitigate it. IACP, together with the Office for Victims of Crime, has been working with police professionals to address work-related trauma exposure and provide solutions to help officers successfully navigate a 20-, 25-. or 30-year career.

    Tina Dimachkieh

    Project Manager

    International Association of Chiefs of Police

    Tina Dimachkieh currently serves as the Project Manager for the Programs Team at the IACP. Ms. Dimachkieh manages programmatic activities for multiple multimillion dollar cooperative agreements with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) in the field of victim services focused on identifying and preventing gender bias through strengthening law enforcement response to crimes of domestic violence, sexual assault, strangulation, and stalking, and addressing and mitigating the negative effects of vicarious trauma. Ms. Dimachkieh works with subject matter experts and advisory board members to provide national comprehensive training and technical assistance (TTA) to law enforcement agencies and multidisciplinary partners composed of victim advocacy groups, criminal justice professionals, first responders, and medical professionals across the country. 

    John Schaffer

    Captain

    Great Falls Police Department

    Captain Schaffer, a native of Bismarck ND, has been with the Great Falls Police Department since 1998 and supervises the Patrol Services Bureau at the Great Falls Police Department.  Prior to that time he served 9 years with the Burleigh County Sheriff’s Department in Bismarck, ND.  He is a graduate of the Minot State University where he earned a Bachelor’s Degree in Criminal Justice.  In addition he is a 2014 graduate of the FBI National Academy in Quantico VA.  

    Captain Schaffer has served as the Captain of Patrol and Investigative Services and as a Lieutenant in Patrol Services. Captain Schaffer has worked in all areas of GFPD as the Training Sergeant and the Swing Shift Sergeant.  He has also served as both a general case investigator and Special Victims Unit Detective.

    Captain Schaffer worked with Northeastern University (MA) and the  US Office of Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs to develop and pilot a Vicarious Trauma Toolkit (VTT) to assist Law Enforcement,  Fire Services, Emergency Medical Services and Victim Services become more trauma informed.  He has provided instruction on the VTT and its use at the 2017 International Association of Chiefs of Police Conference in Philadelphia.  Captain Schaffer has taught in other areas to include Instructor Development, Law Enforcement’s Response to Autism, Disability Awareness, Verbal Tactics, PTSD/Stress Management and Active Shooter.  He also teaches leadership training at the Montana Law Enforcement Academy’s Montana Executive Leadership Institute. He currently serves as the GFPD representative on the Crisis Steering Committee, the Cascade County Mental Health Local Advisory Council as the Vice Chair, The Great Falls Mental Health Treatment Court and the Crisis Response Team and has a passion for improving the outcomes for persons with Mental Health needs interacting with Law Enforcement.

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    This conference workshop presentation features keynote speakers, Jason Porter and Dr. Anna Fitch Courie from FirstNet, Built with AT&T, discussing the role of compassion and establishing a strategy to support officer safety and wellness.

    This conference workshop presentation features keynote speakers, Jason Porter and Dr. Anna Fitch Courie from FirstNet, Built with AT&T, discussing the role of compassion and establishing a strategy to support officer safety and wellness. The speakers share findings from their first responder needs assessment and will share insight on strengthening officer safety and wellness support.

    Jason Porter

    Senior Vice President

    FirstNet, Built with AT&T

    Jason leads AT&T’s FirstNet business. In 2017, AT&T won the privilege of building FirstNet, the first-ever nationwide, wireless network for first responders. Jason is responsible for delivering on the 25-year partnership with the First Responder Network Authority. He is charged with bringing first responders the advanced communications capabilities they need, meeting AT&T’s commitments through the network build, development of products and services, and remote operations capabilities.


    Since beginning his career with AT&T in 2002, Jason has held several leadership positions in engineering, strategy, operations and marketing spanning across the consumer and business customer segments. Jason previously served as the Chief Data Officer and Senior Vice President – Strategic Planning, where he was responsible for global network planning, prioritization of over half of AT&T’s capital spend, design technology, talent enablement and the CDO’s center of excellence for data science, AI, and automation.

    Jason also served as the Vice President of Global Technology Planning and Program Management, where he led the financial and technology roadmaps for AT&T’s wireless and wireline networks, including the execution of those programs. Jason also led AT&T’s cyber security business where he was responsible for driving growth and profitability for the portfolio, and was the Vice President of DevOps for AT&T Partner Solutions, where his team launched over 25 products, reduced cycle times by 75%, and transformed the user experience to earn one the highest Net Promoter Scores in the industry.

    Jason graduated from The United States Military Academy at West Point with a bachelor’s degree in Engineering. He earned a Master of Business Administration from Regis University. He served in the Army as an Armor Officer, leading a Tank Platoon and Mortar Platoon. He and his wife, Tiffany, reside in Frisco with their three children.

    Anna Fitch Courie

    Director

    FirstNet, Built with AT&T

    Anna leads AT&T’s commitment to First Responder Health and Wellness. Joining the team in May 2020, Anna is responsible for creating, developing, and implementing FirstNet strategies, campaigns, and programs that will advance first responder health and wellness programs.

    Anna began her career as a clinical nurse in Bone Marrow Transplant and Medical/Surgical Intensive Care Nursing at Duke University Medical Center and Albemarle Regional hospital. Following a move with her active duty Army soldier, she transitioned to working as a Health Promotion Coordinator with the 1st Infantry Division and Würzburg Medical Hospital where she developed a strategic plan for addressing the community’s health and wellness needs. That experience cemented Anna’s love of working with people to improve a community’s health.


    In 2005, she accepted a position to help design the Army Public Health Center’s strategic plan for community health coalitions. What began as a pilot with four Army installations grew to a program that served 50 Army and Joint installations worldwide where she served as the Evaluation and Policy Project Officer for over 16 years. To that end, Anna brings a wealth of experience in health and wellness coalition development, program management, strategic planning, systems monitoring, and evaluation.


    Anna holds a Bachelor’s in Nursing from Clemson University; a Master’s in Nursing Education from the University of Wyoming; and a Doctor of Nursing Practice degree from Ohio State University. Anna is a passionate Clemson football fan; loves to read, cook, walk, hike; and prior to COVID19, was an avid traveler. She and her husband, Treb, reside in Columbia, SC with their two human children, and one fur-ball child.

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    This conference workshop presentation features discussion on how Post-Traumatic Growth (PTG)-based approaches can be integrated into existing models of support and care, and the ways in which they can foster enhanced resilience, family connectivity, and officer wellbeing.

    This conference workshop presentation features discussion on how Post-Traumatic Growth (PTG)-based approaches can be integrated into existing models of support and care, and the ways in which they can foster enhanced resilience, family connectivity, and officer wellbeing. PTG is a decades-old science that documents how times of struggle and traumatic experiences can serve as catalysts for growth and transformation. In the past several years, the presenters have integrated PTG into a range of programs and trainings for officers and their family members, including acute interventions and peer support engagements. What has become clear is that integrating notions of growth alongside traditional mental health approaches reduces stigma and offers those struggling hope, opportunity, and the incentive to do the hard work to get or stay well.

    Robert A. Swartz

    Detective/Director

    Taunton, Massachusetts, Police Department /Southeastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council CISM

    Detective Robert Swartz is a 32-year Law Enforcement veteran. Swartz is currently assigned to the City of Taunton Massachusetts Police Department’s Detective Division.  In addition, Detective Swartz was a key participant in the creation of the Southeastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council’s Critical Incident Stress Management and Peer Support Team.  Swartz has served as the Director/Commander since the team’s inception. He is personally familiar with trauma and the result of exposure and is a certified instructor in Critical Incident Stress Management.

    Josh Goldberg

    Executive Director

    Boulder Crest Institute for Posttraumatic Growth

    Josh leads the Boulder Crest Institute, which is focused on training people – from veterans to first responders, civilians to mental health professionals – to live great lives, filled with passion, purpose, connection, growth and service. The Institute develops and delivers training, technology, research and evaluation, and social and policy solutions based on the science of Posttraumatic Growth. Josh joined Boulder Crest in June 2014. He led Boulder Crest's efforts to develop the first program ever designed to cultivate and facilitate Posttraumatic Growth (the Warrior PATHH program), co-authored Struggle Well: Thriving in the Aftermath of Trauma, with Boulder Crest’s Founder and Chairman, Ken Falke. 

    Angelo Lapanna

    Sergeant / Co-Coordinator

    Middleborough, Massachusetts, Police Department / Southeastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council (CISM/Peer Support Team)

    Angelo (AJ) Lapanna is a 20-year Law Enforcement veteran. He started his career as an uncercover narcotics investigator with a DEA Task Force. Lapanna served 8 years on a regional SWAT Team, leaving the team as its Tactical Commander. In 2016 Lapanna retired from the Army as an E-8 Master Sergeant after 23 years of service. He served multiple combat deployements in both Iraq and Afghanistan as an Army Special Forces Soldier (Green Beret). During those deployments he served as a Joint Terminal Air Controller (JTAC) and spoke both Arabic and Dari. He has twice been awarded the Bronze Star for actions during combat operations. Lapanna has been been involved in multiple critical incidents throughout both his military and police careers. In 2009 he was diagnosed with PTSD, Lapanna currently serves the Middleborough Police Department in Massachusetts as a Patrol Sergeant. Lapanna was one of the first coodinators of the Southeastern Massachusetts Law Enfocement Council's (SEMLEC) Critical Incident Peer Support Team, a role he still carries on today. Lapanna has a B.S. in Criminal Justice and a M.S. in the Administration of Justice. He is a certified CISM and Suicide Prevention Instructor by the Massachusetts Police Training Committee. He coached varsity High School Hockey for 2 years and his sons Little League Baseball teams for 5 years, is an avid bowhunter, salt water fisherman, he enjoys yoga and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu as well.

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    This conference workshop presentation expands upon information presented at the IACP Annual Conference that demonstrated the impact of de-escalation training on changes in officers' attitudes and confidence, along with demonstrated reductions in officer and citizen injuries.

    This conference workshop presentation expands upon information presented at the IACP Annual Conference that demonstrated the impact of de-escalation training on changes in officers' attitudes and confidence, along with demonstrated reductions in officer and citizen injuries. The panelists describe the types of officers who are most likely to embrace and use de-escalation tactics in the field, the types of situations where de-escalation tactics are most effective, and the resulting impact on officer safety. The panelists also provide different training examples, research findings from multiple police agencies, and stress the importance of a holistic approach to successfully implementing de-escalation training, including the roles for first-line supervisors, middle managers, and police executives.

    Robin S. Engel, PhD

    Professor

    University of Cincinnati

    Robin S. Engel, Ph.D. is a Professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati (UC) and Director of the International Association of Chiefs of Police / UC Center for Police Research and Policy. Dr. Engel engages in police research and evaluation, with expertise in empirical assessments of police behavior, police-community relations, and crime reduction strategies. She promotes best practices in policing by establishing academic-practitioner partnerships, and has served as Principal Investigator for over eighty research grants, totaling over twenty million dollars. She has published over sixty research articles, books, and book chapters, along with dozens of technical reports for practitioners, and has been ranked among top academics, and the number one female in the field of criminal justice/criminology based on publications in prestigious peer-reviewed journals. She has expertise in conducting empirical examinations of racial/ethnic disparities in police stops, arrests, and use of force with over a dozen police agencies, along with direct experience working to rebuild police-community relationships in the aftermath of controversial police uses of force. From 2015-2018, Dr. Engel served as Vice President for Safety and Reform for the University of Cincinnati, where her administrative duties included oversight of the daily operations and implementation of comprehensive reform efforts of the University of Cincinnati Police Division (UCPD) in the aftermath of a critical incident involving the fatal police shooting of an unarmed motorist. Her work on violence reduction resulted in several prominent team awards including the 2008 IACP/Motorola Webber Seavey Award for Excellence in Law Enforcement, the 2009 IACP/West Award for Excellence in Criminal Investigations, and the 2008 National Criminal Justice Association's Outstanding Criminal Justice Program Award. She has served as an expert on policing and violence reduction on panels convened at the White House and 10 Downing Street. In 2017, Dr. Engel was awarded the Distinguished Alumni Award from the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Albany. In 2018, she was appointed by Governor John Kasich to the Ohio Collaborative Community-Police Advisory Board, and reappointed in 2019 by Governor Mike DeWine. She currently serves as the co-chair of IACP's Research Advisory Committee.  

    Justin Witt

    Sergeant

    Louisville Metro, Kentucky, Police Department

    Sgt. Justin Witt is a veteran of the Louisville Metro Police Department. Currently, Sgt. Witt is assigned to the Training Unit where he leads the PTO and Career Development programs. Sgt. Witt has prior experience as a patrol sergeant, an instructor in the Advanced Training Section of the Louisville Metro Police Department and as a plain clothes narcotics detective as well as, being on a gang task force in Louisville. Sergeant Witt has been involved with the writing of a De-Escalation pamphlet for law enforcement agencies in partnership with other members of the LE community and IACP. Sergeant Witt is an instructor for the Police Executive Research Forum as well as the Institute for In-Custody Death. Sergeant Witt also serves on the Louisville Metro Police Department Merit Board, responsible for reviewing disciplinary appeals from members of the department.

    Michael White, PhD

    Professor

    Arizona State University

    Michael D. White, Ph.D. is a Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University, and is Associate Director of ASU's Center for Violence Prevention and Community Safety. Dr. White is Co-Director of Training and Technical Assistance for the U.S. Department of Justice Body-Worn Camera Policy and Implementation Program. He received his Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from Temple University in 1999. Prior to entering academia, Dr. White worked as a deputy sheriff in Pennsylvania. Dr. White's primary research interests involve the police, including use of force, technology, and misconduct. He has published more than 70 articles in peer-reviewed journals and his recent work has been published in Criminology, Justice Quarterly, Criminology and Public Policy, and Criminal Justice and Behavior. He is co-author of Cops, Cameras, and Crisis: The potential and the perils of police body-worn cameras (2020); Stop and Frisk: The Use and Abuse of a Controversial Policing Tactic (2016); and Jammed Up: Bad Cops, Police Misconduct, and the New York City Police Department (2013; all three published by New York University Press). Dr. White has commented extensively in the media on police issues, especially body-worn cameras, including in Scientific American, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Washington Post, TIME Magazine, CNN, NPR, and MSNBC. He also testified about body-worn cameras before the President's Task Force on 21st Century Policing. Dr. White has served as the PI or Co-PI on grants exceeding $8.8 million, including grants from the National Institute of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance, Laura and John Arnold Foundation, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In addition to his current work as Co-Director of Training and Technical Assistance for the U.S. Department of Justice's Body-Worn Camera program, he currently serves as the research partner for two projects with the Tempe Police Department: The Tempe Strategies for Policing Innovation (funded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance), which centers on the development and evaluation of a police de-escalation training program; and the Tempe First Responder Opioid Recovery Project (funded by SAMHSA), which involves training and outfitting all patrol officers with naloxone. He is also currently the co-PI on two National Institute of Justice grants, one evaluating the deployment of body-worn cameras in a local jail and the other employing social network and spatial analysis to understand and address fentanyl distribution networks in Long Beach, CA.  

    Carlena Orosco

    Police Research Data Analyst II

    Tempe, Arizona, Police Department

    Carlena Orosco is a Doctoral Candidate in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. She is also employed full time as a Crime Analyst in the Strategic Planning, Analysis & Research Center (SPARC) at Tempe Police Department. Prior to joining Tempe PD, she worked as a Senior Research Analyst for the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission, Statistical Analysis Center. Carlena holds both a B.A. and M.A. in Criminal Justice from California State University, San Bernardino. Throughout her graduate studies she has served as a Research Assistant and Teaching Assistant, as well as an Instructor for the Nature of Crime, Crime Control Policies, and Urban Crime Patterns courses. Carlena has worked on research projects spanning numerous content areas, including de-escalation in policing, police dispatchers, the spatial dynamics of crime, and law enforcement decision-making. Additionally, she worked for nine years as a police dispatcher for the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, where she also served as an Acting Supervisor, and assisted with the creation of a Frequency Sharing Agreement for Los Angeles County. She is currently a research assistant on the ASU/Tempe PD SPI project under the guidance of Dr. Mike White. Carlena’s work can be found in the Journal of Criminal Justice, Policing: A Journal of Policy and Practice, Policing: An International Journal, and Crime Patterns and Analysis.

View IACP Committee/Section Workshops

View Grant Funded Workshops