2022 Officer Safety and Wellness Symposium Workshops

If you missed the IACP 2022 Officer Safety and Wellness Symposium, it's not too late! Included in this package are some of the most popular workshops, covering topics from resilience to financial wellness. 

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Hear from leading experts in data collection, research, and program implementation around mental health that can help give agencies the catalyst they need to better serve their own officers.

    Learn how to empower the shift from raising awareness to enacting change in support of effective solutions to prevent law enforcement suicide. While progress is continually being made, there is still a significant gap in implementing evidence-based, data-driven, culturally appropriate approaches to truly combat these challenges. This panel will explore suicide prevention, intervention, and postvention. These efforts are not linear, and we must implement a process and procedures to address every piece of this complex and individualized set of circumstances. A comprehensive foundation of planning and support needs to be in place. Hear from leading experts in data collection, research, and program implementation around mental health that can help give agencies the catalyst they need to better serve their own officers.

    • Explore suicide prevention, intervention, and postvention strategies and how agencies can better support their officers.
    • Understand the FBI Law Enforcement Suicide Data Collection efforts and how your agency can become involved.
    • Discuss best practices to support officer mental health, respond to officers who may be approaching crisis, and prepare should a suicide death occur.

    Domingo Herraiz

    Domingo Herraiz has more than 38 years of government and public safety experience in dealing with local, state, and federal policies. He currently serves as the director of Programs for IACP where he oversees the Association’s work in the areas of officer safety and wellness, law enforcement officer suicide, mental health, crisis response, children and youth, criminal justice system reform, information sharing and technology, human trafficking, domestic violence and sexual assault, crime and victimization, community-police engagement, and traffic safety. Prior to joining IACP, he served as the Vice President of North America Government Affairs for Motorola Solutions, where he was responsible for public policy and federal government relations in the United States and Canada. Before joining Motorola Solutions, he served as the Presidentially appointed, U.S. Senate-confirmed director of the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) at the Department of Justice (DOJ) under President George W. Bush. As the director of BJA, he led DOJ’s largest funding and policy unit for the state, local, and tribal criminal justice issues. Prior to his role as director of the BJA, Herraiz served on Ohio Governor Bob Taft’s cabinet as the director of Criminal Justice Services. He also served as the executive director of the Ohio Crime Prevention Association.

    Tim Gardiner, MJA

    Probation and Parole Officer

    Alabama Bureau of Pardons and Parole - Retired Birmingham PD

    Tim Gardiner began his law enforcement career in 2008 with the Birmingham Police Department in Alabama. After working in patrol 5 years, he was transferred to the Community Service Division where he served as a School Resource Officer and Community Project Coordinator. In 2018, Tim was promoted to Sergeant and was assigned as Patrol and Training Supervisor, School Resource Supervisor and Adjunct Training Instructor teaching mental health, suicide awareness/intervention and officer wellness. In 2021, Tim took a position with the Alabama Bureau of Pardons and Parole as a Probation/Parole Officer working in an intensive supervision program designed to assist newly released offenders in being successful. Prior to law enforcement, Tim is a United States Marine Corps combat veteran, and served as a Volunteer Firefighter in 3 states. Tim and his wife, Season, love to travel around the world when they get free time. Tim has seen and experienced firsthand the stress and crisis our veterans and first responders go through on a continuous basis. He has continuously sought out training and opportunities to be able to help those in need. Tim teaches Law Enforcement Preventing Suicide, Officer Wellness, Mental Fitness and Mental First Aid to law enforcement agencies. Tim established the Birmingham PD Peer Support and Officer Wellness Program. He currently serves as the Alabama Law Enforcement Alliance for Peer Support Region G Coordinator, where he provides guidance and support to over 100 Certified Peer Support Team Members across 8 counties in central Alabama. He assisted in the establishment of legislation to protect peer support members in the State of Alabama. He assisted in the establishment of legislation to protect peer support members in the State of Alabama. He has advised law enforcement executives and elected officials on the topics of Officer Wellness and Mental Health.

    Lora L. Klingensmith

    Management Program Analyst, Federal Bureau of Investigation

    Jennifer Myers

    Mental Health Counselor and Violence and Trauma Training Development Manager, Education Development Center

    Christopher Scallon, MSPsy

    Founder, Owner

    Trauma Behind the Badge

    Sgt (Ret.)Christopher J.A. Scallon, MPsy, CCISM. Sergeant Chris Scallon retired as a 24+year veteran with the Norfolk Police Department, holds a Masters in Psychology, BS in Criminal Justice, and certified in Critical Incident Stress Management from the University of Maryland BC Emergency Health Services. He is the current National Public Safety Liaison for Shatterproof First Responders’ and Veterans’ program. He is the Founder of Survival Mindset Training and Consulting, Co-Founder of Trauma Behind the Badge. He provides direct mental health and/or substance abuse services, in addition to connecting first responders, veterans, and their families to resources. He is a current consultant/responder for the Department of Justice Antiterrorism and Emergency Assistance Program (AEAP). He was the founder, and first Director, of the Norfolk Police Department’s Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) & Peer Support Unit, Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Co-Coordinator for the Norfolk Police Department. Sgt. Scallon is a peer and current board member of Virginia Law Enforcement Assistance Program (VALEAP), a certified peer with the West Coast Post Trauma Retreat/First Responder Support Network. Having been involved in multiple shootings he is intimately familiar with trauma and the consequences of exposure. Former Director of Public Safety Support for Chateau Recovery.
  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    A critical component of law enforcement wellness programs is effective, culturally competent chaplaincy focused on police officers and their family members. Chaplains can be a trusted resource that is fully integrated into other agency wellness efforts.

    A critical component of law enforcement wellness programs is effective, culturally competent chaplaincy focused on police officers and their family members. Chaplains can be a trusted resource that is fully integrated into other agency wellness efforts. This requires having a clear understanding of what effective, culturally competent chaplaincy looks like, how to screen for the right chaplains, how to establish their roles and expectations, and how to train and equip them. Different perspectives, resources, and organizations will be covered as a means to evaluate your current chaplaincy program or start your future program on the right path.

    • Upon completion, participants will be able to describe at least three key aspects of an effective, culturally competent police chaplain and chaplaincy program, and determine how to integrate it into established agency wellness programs.
    • Upon completion, participants will be able to list at least two of the next steps in order to develop a new chaplaincy program or evaluate their current program.
    • Upon completion, participants will be able to list at least three useful chaplaincy resources, organizations, and policies.

    Jeremy Wade

    Peer Support, Wellness

    Fearless Resilience LLC

    Jeremy Wade is the founder of Fearless Resilience LLC, offering resilience, wellness, and peer support training and consulting. He served as a Seattle Police Officer for over 13 years with a long list of accomplishments, including; Medal of Valor, Officer of the Year, Officer of the Month (Washington’s Most Wanted on Q13 FOX), and the City of Seattle Community Outreach Leadership Award. He led a successful peer support team for 5 years, and assisted in developing the department’s first wellness unit. He developed and trained the agency’s first resilience program and mentorship program. He also served as the Seattle Police Chaplains Association Executive Director for over 8 years, and currently oversees training and development for the Fellowship of Christian Peace Officers- USA.

    Matt Domyancic, MS, MS, MA

    Chaplain, Peer Support, and Wellness Ministry

    Global Associates

    Matt Domyancic is a medically retired police officer that worked patrol, peer support, SWAT, and full time police academy instructor for fitness and officer survival. Matt was the Wellness Coordinator for his agency integrating sports nutrition, strength and conditioning, stress management, combatives, and scenario training regarding officers as tactical athletes. He also was concurrently a collegiate strength coach at Yale and Georgetown Universities while a full-time police officer. Later he was a strength coach and mental skills trainer for NFL combine athletes. At Yale, he volunteered for Athletes in Action and at Georgetown, he created an ecumenical ministry Hoyas for Christ. Matt now volunteers as a chaplain, peer support, and wellness advocate for police agencies in Los Angeles. He also is a volunteer for nonprofits that support police officers in crisis, as well as those that are injured and disabled. Matt also spent time as a chaplain for an in-patient substance abuse and PTSD facility for first responders. He believes all first responders can have careers that provide deeper meaning and add richness to their spiritual lives if approached in the right manner. Matt played football and was a competitive powerlifter at the Air Force Academy and Colgate Univeristy where he earned his BA in Political Science. He also has an MS in Forensic Science under Dr. Henry Lee, an MS in Sport Psychology under Dr. Ken Ravizza, and an MA in Pastoral Theology from Loyola Marymount University. Matt is a certified Spiritual Director through Still Point Direction School.

    Stephanie Barone McKenny, PhD

    Police Psychologist, Los Angeles, California, Police Department

    Dr. Stephanie Barone McKenny is an LAPD police psychologist who provides consultation to several elite units including SWAT, Air Support Division, and undercover agents. She has worked with law enforcement personnel at the international, national, state, county, and local levels.  Dr. McKenny is also a Diplomate in Sports Psychology, a Nationally Certified Sports Psychologist, a Certified Trauma Professional, and she is Certified in Integrative Medicine for holistic health (mind-body-spirit).  

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Take the next step in building a resilient support system for agency families by speaking with subject matter experts on implementing effective family programming.

    Family resilience and wellbeing are critical components of officer wellness. Agencies who proactively implement family support programming can expect improved retention, resilient officers, and happier communities. Implementing family support may take the form of social events, spouse and family education through ride-along activities or benefit information sessions, and highlighting the resources available to family members. Take the next step in building a resilient support system for agency families by speaking with subject matter experts on implementing effective family programming.

    • Learn about the value of family wellness programming for officers, family members, and policing agencies.
    • Identify strategies to launch or enhance family wellness programming in an agency.
    • Prepare for common program challenges.

    Jim Baker

    Commissioner, Vermont Department of Corrections

    James W. Baker served with the Vermont State Police for over 30 years. He was promoted to the rank of Colonel and appointed to the position of Director of the Vermont State Police on September 1, 2006 by Public Safety Commissioner Kerry L. Sleeper. He received a B.S. in Criminal Justice Management from Southern Vermont College and is a graduate of the 188th Session of the FBI National Academy at Quantico, Virginia.  Baker has an extensive background in all aspects of law enforcement. He served as a Trooper, Detective Trooper, Sergeant Patrol Commander, Det. Sgt., Lieutenant Station Commander, Captain Troop Commander and Assistant Field Force Commander. Baker was promoted to the rank of Major in December 2004 and served as the Field Force Commander. Colonel Baker retired from the Vermont State Police on June 30, 2009 to start a consulting practice entitled JW Consulting. Through his consulting he has served as the Interim Director of the Vermont Police Academy, Acting Police Chief in the Town of  Manchester, Vt., Interim Chief of Police for City of Rutland, Vt. and project consultant for the FBI National Law Enforcement Data Exchange (N-DEx) program. Baker also served as Executive Support Specialist for the Nationwide Suspicious Activity Initiative within the U.S. Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Assistance.      Baker was appointed the Chief of Police for the City of Rutland in August 2012. He left the position of Chief of Police in January 2015 to accept a position with the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) as the Director of Law Enforcement Operations and Support. He later served as the Director of Advocacy. In his role at IACP Baker worked on national and international criminal justice issues to include the development of the Institute of Community Police Relations. In May 2018 Baker left IACP to devote more time to his consulting practice. His past work includes the project lead of the Arlington (Vt.) Area Renewal Project, leadership coaching, first responder safety and wellness and law enforcement executive searches. Baker currently serves as the Interim Commissioner of the Vermont Department of Corrections.         

    Kimberly Jackson-Luzader, Master's of Counselor Education, Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor (NC LCMHC), Nationally Certified Counselor (NCC)

    Trauma Counselor

    Raleigh Police Department

    Kimberly Jackson-Luzader is the first and only Trauma Counselor for the Raleigh Police Department (RPD). Her position was established in 2016 to offer short-term counseling, emotional support, and community resource referrals to individuals who have experienced traumatic events. In 2019, a Raleigh officer was critically injured in the line of duty and this traumatic incident highlighted an urgent need for law enforcement family support. Kimberly was able to quickly bridge this gap utilizing her trauma experience and program development and management skills. With this opportunity Kimberly’s role evolved into the Coordinator for RPD’s Families Behind the Badge, in addition to her primary duties as a Trauma Counselor. Families Behind the Badge is a support network that strives to be a resource for all RPD family members and defines family as those who love and support our RPD officers. She is an active champion for Officer Safety and Wellness within her current department and has assisted in developing a variety of wellness initiatives. Prior to joining the Raleigh Police Department, she worked as an outpatient therapist in both community and private sectors. She has over 12 years of clinical experience and advanced training specializing in trauma, grief, loss, suicide bereavement, and critical incident management. Kimberly holds a bachelor’s degree in Social Work from the University of Findlay and a master’s degree in Counseling from NC State University. She is a Licensed Clinical Mental Health Counselor in North Carolina and a Nationally Certified Counselor.

    Ralph LeBlanc, Masters in Criminal Justice Anna Maria College

    Chief of Police

    Westminster, Massachusetts Police Department

    Chief Ralph LeBlanc has been a member of the Westminster Police Department since 1993 starting as a part-time dispatcher and assending through the ranks, becoming Chief of Police in September of 2020. He has been progresive in his appraoch to officer health and wellness with his small department and advocating for his officers. Chief LeBlanc is a member of the Massachusetts Chiefs of Police CISM/Peer Support Committee,

    Hugh Velasquez

    Commander

    Colorado Springs Police Department

    Hugh M. Velasquez is a commander with the Colorado Springs Police Department. He oversees the Professional Standards Division which includes the Professional Development, Compliance, and Wellness Section, the Evidence/Impound Section, the Internal Affairs Section, The Public Affairs Section, and the Police Psychologist. Commander Velasquez's service with the Colorado Springs Police Department began at the Sand Creek Patrol Division in 1997, where he became a property crime detective in 2001. He then transferred to the Homicide Unit in 2002. He was promoted to sergeant in 2005, where he served in three patrol divisions (Gold Hill, Falcon, and Sand Creek). He also served as a sergeant in the Sex Crimes/Crimes Against Children Unit from 2007-2011. He was promoted to lieutenant in 2012, where he served in three patrol divisions (Sand Creek, Stetson Hills, and Falcon). As a patrol lieutenant, at differing times, he also oversaw the School Resource Officer Unit, the Sand Creek Division Impact Unit, and GangNet. He served in the Professional Standards Division as the training director from 2012-2016. His final assignment as a lieutenant was in the Patrol Support Section of the Specialized Enforcement Division in 2019. Commander Velasquez earned a bachelor’s degree in Political Science from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1995. He attended the FBI Rocky Mountain Command College, Center for Creative Leadership’s Leadership Development Program, and the Colorado POST-University of Denver Daniels Executive Education Program’s Public Leadership Program.
  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    This presentation shares the findings of a research study conducted by John Jay College of Criminal Justice in Fall 2020.

    This presentation shares the findings of a research study conducted by John Jay College of Criminal Justice during Fall 2020. The study explored the effectiveness of service dogs to support and promote officer wellness in two midsized police departments. Six dimensions of police officer wellness were examined including: operational and organizational stress; topical stressors including those related to the COVID-19 pandemic, police use of force, community relations, and police reform efforts; Perceived Organizational Support (POS); receptivity to service dogs; and willingness to seek assistance for mental health issues. Best practices and lessons learned regarding service dog programs will be shared by police leaders from a suburban and urban department with a service dog program.

    • Discuss the benefits and limitations of service dogs when used for officer wellness.
    • Recognize potential obstacles to implementing an effective service dog program.
    • Design a service dog program for their agency that best addresses individual officer and organizational needs.

    Kenneth Quick, Master of Science

    Inspector / PhD Candidate

    NYPD / John Jay College of Criminal Justice

    Kenneth Quick joined the New York City Police Department (NYPD) in 1999. Over his more than 22 years of police experience, he rose through the ranks to his current designation of Inspector. As a police officer and sergeant, he worked in Brooklyn, patrolling some of the city’s highest crime neighborhoods. As a sergeant, he received a police department scholarship to attend John Jay College of Criminal Justice and received his Master of Science Degree in Protection Management, focusing his studies in Security and Emergency Management. He was then assigned to the NYPD’s Office of Management Analysis and Planning, where he researched, developed, and implemented various department programs and policies. As a captain, he led proactive enforcement operations in Brooklyn that targeted violent offenders and prioritized removing illegal firearms from the street. Due to his success in this role, he was assigned as the Commanding Officer of Brooklyn’s 66th Precinct, which serves a diverse, multi-cultural community. During his tenure, he forged strong community relationships, reduced crime, and reinforced the principals of procedural justice during his daily interactions with officers and staff. Due to his unique abilities and experience in both operational and administrative assignments, Kenneth is currently assigned as the Commanding Officer of the Employee Relations Bureau, which is tasked with morale enhancement, employee engagement, promoting the health and wellbeing of all members, supporting the families of fallen officers and members who are seriously ill or injured, and is liaison to the department’s fraternal organizations. He is also a graduate of Columbia University’s Police Management Institute. In addition to his role at the NYPD, Kenneth is a third year doctoral student at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. His research interests include the effect of officer morale and well-being on agency performance and community satisfaction with the police.

    Louis Fusaro, MS

    Chief of Police

    Groton Police Department

    L. J. Fusaro is the Chief of Police and Emergency Management Director for the Town of Groton, Connecticut, having been appointed in July 2015. He manages a budget of $9.5 million and he oversees the administration and operations of 70 officers and 20 civilian staff members. In 2019 the GTPD partnered with Puppies Behind Bars for the first of its kind Officer Wellness/Police Service Dog, serving Groton with positive community outreach while also assisting many other first responders and agencies. Chief Fusaro is a retired Major from the Connecticut State Police, having held multiple command positions in over 21 years. His last was Director, Office of Counterterrorism/Connecticut Intelligence Center. He concurrently served as the Commanding Officer of the State Police Emergency Services Unit, overseeing SWAT, Dive, K9, Aviation, Marine, Bomb, and Fire & Explosive Units. He's received numerous awards throughout his career to include recognition by the FBI Director for service as the Tactical Commander for the Sandy Hook shootings in December 2012. In 2020 he received the Distinguished Chiefs Award from the Connecticut Police Commissioners Assn. Chief Fusaro holds a bachelors degree from The Citadel and a masters degree from Western New England University. He is a graduate of the 236th Session of the FBI NA, the USSS Dignity Protection Seminar and the Naval Postgraduate School Executive Leader and Fusion Center Leader Programs. His professional affiliations include IACP, PERF, Military Police Regimental Association, and the National Guard Association of the United States. He also serves on the Board of Directors of Safe Futures, an organization that works for those impacted by domestic violence. Chief Fusaro serves as Colonel in the Connecticut Army National Guard, where he commands the 169th Regiment (RTI) and oversees the Subject Matter Expert cell for the Army National Guard’s Military Police branch.

    Mark Wachter

    Deputy Inspector, New York City Police Department

    Deputy Inspector Mark Wachter began his career in February 1992 as an Auxiliary Police Officer in the 104th Precinct, where he returned as the Commanding Officer in March, 2015.  His rapid ascent through the ranks is indicative of his determination, and in March, 2017 he was transferred to the Career Enhancement Division within the Personnel Bureau. One of the many units under his purview was the Employee Assistance Unit, where under his leadership, many projects and initiatives came to fruition. In August, 2019 Deputy Inspector Wachter was transferred along with the Employee Assistance Unit to the newly established Health and Wellness Section, where he also oversees the Department Sports Team Liaison Unit and the Wellness Outreach and Support Unit.  There is now a Health and Wellness App on all 35,000 Department smartphones, allowing members to access resources at their fingertips. On this app lists all the Department Peer Support members, a program launched in October, 2019, to ensure trained peers in commands are available to assist and proactively check in with fellow members of the service experiencing stressful or difficult moments in their professional or personal lives. Along with a Wellness video series, 55,000 members were trained via TACTICS on the purpose of the Employee Assistance Unit. Recently, the Employee Assistance Unit has doubled its staffing to ensure the needs of members throughout the five boroughs are addressed in a timely manner.  In partnership with the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, over 10,000 uniformed and civilian members have been trained in Mental Health First Aid. Deputy Inspector Wachters tireless dedication to helping all members of the service has resulted in new and innovative methods to address overall wellness for the Department 

    Heather McClelland

    Police Officer/Canine Handler

    Groton Police Department

    OFC Heather McClelland is a 10-year veteran of the Town of Groton Police Department. She is currently assigned as the Community Policing Officer and Officer Wellness Coordinator. OFC McClelland started the Police Service Dog Program in 2019 and has been partnered with K-9 Chase for the past year and half. Chase accompanies OFC McClelland in all aspects of her job, including CISM debriefings, officer wellness for first responders, community outreach events, school visits and teaching D.A.R.E..Chase also helps victims of crimes and works with the victim advocate in New London County. Chase was the first dog of her kind in CT, whose main focus was providing officer wellness and community outreach.

    Ronald Thomas

    Detective/Canine Handler

    New York City Police Department

    Det. Thomas has been a member of the New York City Police Department for 24 years. Currently he is assigned to the Employee Assistance Unit and serves as a handler for Det. Piper. They provide animal assisted interventions for members of the service experiencing hardship. Additionally, Det's Thomas and Piper perform Critical Incident Stress Debriefings, Peer Support and educational training for members of the Department.
  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    This presentation discusses the laws surrounding peer support in order to guide teams in their creation, implementation, and maintenance of their own programs.

    This presentation discusses the laws surrounding peer support in order to guide teams in their creation, implementation, and maintenance of their own programs. The presenter uses the laws of the California government code as a model to guide team policies, particularly for those in states that do not currently have peer support legislation. The goal is to have a peer support team that will be able to maintain confidentiality, integrity, and protection from liability or potential litigation.

    • Identify the best practices to implement their team.
    • Define appropriate confidentiality requirements and exceptions.
    • Conduct training that will assist in creating liability protection for their agency, team, and individual supporters.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    This presentation and interactive demonstration addressed common misconceptions about yoga, cites research that shows the benefits of yoga for law enforcement, and introduces job-specific and culturally-informed exercises and techniques that have made yoga successful in law enforcement settings.

    This presentation and interactive demonstration addressed common misconceptions about yoga, cites research that shows the benefits of yoga for law enforcement, and introduces job-specific and culturally-informed exercises and techniques that have made yoga successful in law enforcement settings. This session presents key concepts from Yoga For First Responders (YFFR) training protocol including tactical breathwork, physical drills/mobility training, and mindfulness techniques that YFFR teaches as a tangible skill set to proactively protect from post-traumatic stress, sleep disorders, and common injuries, as well as how to effectively process stress, build resilience, and enhance performance. With this interactive session, participants leave with tools to immediately integrate into their daily lives.

    • Explain the intention of yoga for law enforcement, address misconceptions about yoga, and understand how yoga can influence the basic functions of the nervous system and stress response.
    • Define mindfulness, awareness, and resilience, and be able to practice tangible techniques for each of these areas.
    • Illustrate how yoga trains an officer to perform at their highest level of functioning for tactical performance, career longevity, and personal life satisfaction including learning basic techniques to share with others.

    Olivia Mead, ERYT 500

    Founder/CEO

    Yoga For First Responders

    Olivia Mead is Founder and CEO of the non-profit organization YogaShield® Yoga For First Responders® (YFFR). Olivia is a life-long yoga practitioner along with studying Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Human Performance and Trauma-Sensitive Yoga for Veterans. She has taught yoga since 2003 and has focused primarily on public safety since 2013 starting at Los Angeles Fire Department and Los Angeles Police Department. Since then, Olivia has taught and spoken around the county at several trade conferences and public safety agencies. Olivia is a member of the Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association and the International Society of Fire Service Instructors. YFFR recently launched an online platform and app available on desktop and the app store.

    Patricia Froehlich, JD

    Retired State's Attorney, Instructor II

    Yoga For First Responders

    Patricia (Trish) Froehlich has been regularly practicing yoga since 2008, although she fondly remembers her adult education yoga classes from the early 1980s! A doctor suggested Trish practice yoga to help with asthma. She immediately found breath control techniques beneficial, not just with asthma but with the sense of calm the breathwork provided. Trish served as a Connecticut prosecutor for over 26 years, starting in Connecticut’s Judicial District of Danbury and retiring in 2016 as State’s Attorney for the Judicial District of Windham. From one end of Connecticut to the other, Trish found immense stress relief not only while practicing but also off the mat, taking to the courtroom and office the deep breathing techniques and focus she learned on the mat. From 2012-2015 Trish represented CT on the National District Attorneys Association’s Board of Directors and often found yoga studios at which to practice while traveling the country to attend meetings. During her career Trish often practiced using DVDs and online programs but has always favored the energy and camaraderie that comes from practicing with others when possible. She earned her 200-hour teacher training certificate at Nadi Om Wellness in Ocala, FL and is excited about continuing to share yoga. She is a Registered Yoga Teacher (RYT-200) with Yoga Alliance. Trish is also certified as a Level II instructor by Yoga for First Responders. She is certified by Laskshmi Voelker to teach chair yoga and by Bernie Clark to teach yin yoga. Trish believes that yoga should be accessible to people of every size, shape, age, and fitness level. She currently teaches at four fitness centers in Ocala, FL and is among a small group of teachers offering free yoga at Ocala’s Sholom Park.

    Joseph J. Froehlich, BS

    Retired Deputy Chief, Instructor II

    Yoga For First Responders

    Joe Froehlich spent 32 years in Connecticut law enforcement, holding positions in patrol and major crime and was a canine handler, tactical team member, and eventually an administrator. He spent most of his career working for the Connecticut State Police. In 2007 he was appointed deputy chief in the Putnam Police Department. Upon his retirement from law enforcement Joe served as Director of Law Enforcement Services for the Connecticut Coalition Against Domestic Violence. He is recognized by the federal Office on Violence Against Women to train law enforcement and domestic violence advocates across the country in the area of response to and prevention of domestic violence. While serving as a deputy chief Joe discovered that yoga was so much more than just a good stretch. He found yoga to be a great relief from the stressors that face law enforcement officers. Along with support from his wife and friends he found yoga helped him through the challenges of being a deputy chief. Yoga is part of the resilience that has served Joe well throughout his career and into retirement. Joe completed his RYT-200-hour yoga teaching certificate in 2021. He is a certified Instructor 2 with Yoga for First Responders and a member of Veterans Yoga Project Teacher Alliance. He also has certifications in Chair Yoga and Yin Yoga. He currently teaches yoga at four different fitness centers located in Ocala, FL. He enjoys a variety of different practices from a gentle practice to a challenging practice designed to energize the body while regulating the entire nervous system.
  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    The focus of this presentation was the benefits of financial fitness as they relate to reducing stress and increasing officer safety.

    Most people do not become police officers for the pay, and very few police departments provide any type of financial training. The focus of this presentation was the benefits of financial fitness as they relate to reducing stress and increasing officer safety. A standard police academy offers more than 1,000 hours of training in criminal law, officer safety, driving, shooting, and defensive tactics. In-service training often includes day and night fire, various required topics, active shooter, internal affairs updates, and legal updates. In short, we provide an extensive amount of training in areas to make you successful on the job. You also can benefit from information and training to increase your financial fitness.

    • 1. At the conclusion of the session, participants will have an increased understanding of the benefits of financial fitness.
    • 2. At the conclusion of the session, participants will have an increased understanding of the importance of budgeting and debt management.
    • 3. At the conclusion of the session, participants will have an increased understanding of the basic concepts of investing and planning for retirement.

    David Perry, Masters in Public Administration

    Chief of Police (Retired)

    Institute for Intergovernmental Research

    Chief David L. Perry (Ret.) is a Senior Research Associate for the Institute for Intergovernmental Research (IIR). In his position, he is responsible for developing and delivering classroom / web-based or online training programs and technical assistance as well as providing on-site facilitation for federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies. His responsibilities also include providing primary support to all areas of program engagement. The Institute for Intergovernmental Research (IIR) is a Florida-based nonprofit corporation specializing in criminal justice (law enforcement focus) and Officer Safety and Wellness issues. As the former Assistant Vice-Chancellor and Chief of Police for the University of North Carolina serving from 2019 to 2021, his responsibilities were to oversee all aspects of Public Safety. Perry has previously served as police chief for Florida State University, Clemson University, and Albany State University. Perry has worked in law enforcement and campus safety for 25 years. He has provided campus safety assessments throughout the country to assist with the overall improvement of safety in many communities. Perry has also presented in-service training courses to campus, federal, municipal, and tribal law enforcement agencies. In addition to serving as the Past President for the North Florida Chapter of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE), David is a past president for the Florida Police Chiefs Association and past president for the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators where he represented colleges and universities around the world. David is a graduate of Albany State University with a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Criminal Justice (1993). He holds a Master’s in Public Administration from Albany State University (2002). He has also completed the basic police recruit training academies in Georgia, South Carolina, Florida, and North Carolina.

    Deborah Meader

    Policy Advisor

    Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice

    Christopher Gandia, CFP®

    Captain (Ret.)

    Londonderry New Hampshire Police Department

    Christopher J. Gandia, CFP® Captain Christopher J. Gandia, retired from the Londonderry, New Hampshire, Police Department (LPD), formerly assigned as the division commander for the Manchester-Boston Regional Airport. His career encompassed 25+ years of law enforcement experience and 28 years of financial experience. Interwoven career paths of finance and law enforcement created unique opportunities and experiences for him. After earning his degree in 1993, Captain Gandia turned to law enforcement in 1996, when he began his career with the LPD as a patrol officer. He also served as a sergeant, lieutenant and recently retired as captain in 2022. His career has included various tasks such as fiscal management, budgetary planning, internal auditing, organizational development, strategic planning, departmental training programs, and personnel leadership initiatives. In addition, from 1999 to 2014, he served on the Southern New Hampshire Regional SWAT Team. Captain Gandia’s prior experience includes Pricewaterhouse Coopers, LLC, as an external auditor, and Zoom Telephonics as a financial analyst. He also performed as a lead instructor for the National Sheriffs’ Association and the National Domestic Preparedness Coalition. Captain Gandia earned a bachelor of science degree in accountancy from Providence College, an advanced certificate in financial planning from Merrimack College, and his CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ designation in 2003.

    Brandon Post

    Captain (Ret.)

    Institute for Intergovernmental Research

    Captain Brandon Post retired from the Provo, Utah, Police Department (PPD) in 2021 after 20 years of service. Captain Post most recently served as Commander of the Patrol Division. Before this assignment, he served as the Commander of the Special Operations Division, where he supervised the department’s major crimes, special enforcement, community-oriented policing, and school resource officer teams. Captain Post was also the Commander of both the SWAT team and the Hostage Negotiations Team and served as the PPD Public Information Officer. Captain Post began his law enforcement career in 2000 as a dispatcher in the Emergency Medical and Police Dispatch Unit. As a police officer, he became a firearm and defensive tactics instructor. He became a member of the SWAT Team in 2005, eventually serving as a squad leader, a marksman/observer, and team leader. He is fluent in speaking, reading, and writing Spanish. Captain Post is a senior research associate with the Institute for Intergovernmental Research, where he provides instruction on officer safety and wellness. He earned his bachelor of arts degree in political science from Brigham Young University in Provo and his associate’s degree in criminal justice from Ricks College in Rexburg, Idaho. Captain Post is a graduate of the 273rd Session of the Federal Bureau of Investigation National Academy.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Having immediate peer support readily available is crucial to maintaining mental wellbeing. Current peer support programming is geared towards front-line first responders. However, there are unique and complex mental and emotional stressors that command-level staff face daily, along with sometimes more than 20 years of first-line trauma they accumulated while working in the field.

    Having immediate peer support readily available is crucial to maintaining mental wellbeing. Current peer support programming is geared towards front-line first responders. However, there are unique and complex mental and emotional stressors that command-level staff face daily, along with sometimes more than 20 years of first-line trauma they accumulated while working in the field. Discussed during this presentation is the 66-member, cross-disciplined, Commander Level Peer Support Team - featured at many national conferences, in magazines, and on podcasts. This training program involves discussions on many topics, such as toxic leadership, suicide risk assessment, basics of CISDs, practice scenarios, and equestrian work at War Horses for Veterans.

    • The participant will be able to understand the purpose and ethical issues associated with commander-level peer support and discuss how to mitigate the boundaries and challenges by making accountable leadership decisions.
    • The participant will be able to identify laws and policies associated with confidentiality and peer support.
    • The participant will be able to identify risk factors associated with mental illness, suicide, burnout, domestic violence, and substance abuse among first responders.

    Dan Davis

    Lieutenant

    Belton Police Department

    Dan Davis I began with the Belton Missouri Police Department in January of 1994 as a corrections officer. I then became a dispatcher in March of 1994. I was promoted to Patrolman in July of 1994 and sent to the Kansas City Missouri Regional Police Academy I have served in the following specialized units during my career: Critical Incident Response Team (SWAT) Armorer Defensive Tactics Instructor Bicycle Patrol Hostage Negotiator Motorcycle Officer CIT Officer / Coordinator I moved up through the ranks of Corporal, Sergeant and was promoted to Lieutenant in March of 2018. In my current position, I am the Patrol Division commander, the jail administrator, commander of the Victim Advocate Unit, the recruiting coordinator and the public information officer. In December of 2019, I joined the Mid America Regional Council’s (MARC) command level peer support team. During my time on the team, I have been active in several critical incident stress debriefings as well as offering support to other commanders on a “one on one” basis as needed. In the spring of 2021, I had the honor of becoming the Missouri co-chair of the command level peer support team along with my Kansas cohort Captain Matthew Kelly from the Miami County Kansas Sheriff’s Department. I joined the International Association of Chiefs of Police in April of 2021 in the Public Information Officers section attending the mid-year PIO conference in Arlington, Texas.

    Matthew Kelly

    Captain

    Miami County Sheriff's Office

    I started my Law Enforcement career in 2007 with the Louisburg Kansas Police Department. I worked there for a little over 5 years as a Patrol Officer, but due to the small size of the agency, I was eager to branch out in a larger agency. In late 2012 I was hired by the Miami County, Kansas Sheriff's Office and since then I have been a Deputy assigned to Patrol, Detective, Sergeant assigned to Patrol and now Captain of Operations which consists of Patrol, Dispatch, Court Security, Investigations and Administration. Additionally I am the Commander for the Special Operations Response Team and the agency Public Information Officer. I have been the Captain for going on 4 years. Effective April 2, 2022 I will become the Undersheriff. Our agency has 87 employees with 44 of them sworn and 43 civilian. I have been a Command Level Peer Support member since 2019 after completing the Mid America Regional Council's 40-hour training. I became a Co-Chair of the Command Level Peer Support team in 2021.
  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    This presentation is part of the VALOR Officer Safety and Wellness Program. As a law enforcement officer, the body is one of the greatest tools on the job. Physical health can make all the difference when apprehending a subject, surviving a critical incident, and much more.

    This presentation is part of the VALOR Officer Safety and Wellness Program. As a law enforcement officer, the body is one of the greatest tools on the job. Physical health can make all the difference when apprehending a subject, surviving a critical incident, and much more. However, some law enforcement officers de-prioritize their physical health and endanger themselves by not being physically prepared for the job. This panel discussion features lessons learned and techniques for making behavior changes based on promising practices and personal stories of law enforcement executive leaders from across the country. It will show officers how to improve their overall health and wellness through simple tasks, such as maintaining a proper diet and getting quality sleep.

    • Articulate the importance of strength training and functional fitness as it relates to the law enforcement profession.
    • Articulate the importance of maintaining a healthy relationship with food and the importance of meal planning.
    • Articulate the concept that sleep is beneficial to both their bodies and minds, and how it can enhance their physical health and safety.

    Sonia Quinones, MPA

    Chief of Police (Ret)

    Hallandale Beach Florida Police Department

    Chief Sonia Quiñones (retired) served in law enforcement for more than 28 years, 21 of which were in management. Her career began in 1993, as a patrol officer for the City of Hallandale Beach, Florida. She worked her way up through the ranks and was appointed to Chief of Police in 2017. Chief Quiñones earned her master’s degree in public administration at Barry University. She is a 2012 graduate of the Federal Bureau of Investigation National Academy (FBINA). Chief Quiñones continues to contribute to the betterment of law enforcement as an instructor with the VALOR Officer Safety and Wellness Program and the National Suicide Awareness for Law Enforcement Officer (SAFLEO) Program. She is the First Vice President for the National Association of Women Law Enforcement Executives (NAWLEE) and a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), Human and Civil Rights Committee.

    Cory Tchida

    Interim Chief of Police

    Georgetown Police Department

    Interim Chief Cory J. Tchida has more than 25 years of experience in law enforcement, including duties in corrections, patrol, narcotics, traffic, professional standards, and administration. Currently, he is the Interim Chief of the Georgetown, Texas, Police Department. In this position, he manages and leads the day-to-day operations of the department, including patrol, criminal investigations, traffic, records, community engagement, and communications. He has more than 20 years of experience leading police officers and civilians at all levels of the organization. Interim Chief Tchida’s teaching experience includes topics such as use of force, racial profiling, crime statistics, traffic safety, wellness, fitness, suicide prevention, and leadership and supervision. Interim Chief Tchida has been with the Georgetown Police Department for more than 25 years, beginning his career as a patrol officer. For ten years, he was a sergeant responsible for patrol, training, traffic, and narcotics. He created a workload metric tracking system for patrol officers, coordinated department training, conducted a complete rewrite of the standard operating procedures for the Narcotics Unit, and reformed the Traffic Unit. When he became lieutenant of patrol and administration, among other duties, he assisted in the restructuring of the department firearms training program, including phased levels of training and metric tracking of performance issues. Interim Chief Tchida has made presentations to Citizen Police Academy classes, citizens’ groups, and peace officers all over the country. He is a longtime board member of the Williamson County CASA. He earned a master of science degree in criminal justice leadership and management from Sam Houston State University and a bachelor of arts degree in government from the University of Texas at Austin. Interim Chief Tchida is a 2014 graduate of Northwestern University’s School of Police Staff and Command and a 2018 graduate of the FBI National Academy Session #272.

    Deborah Meader

    Policy Advisor

    Bureau of Justice Assistance, U.S. Department of Justice

    William Balling, MA

    Chief of Police

    Sidney Police Department

    William P. Balling Chief William P. Balling has more than 28 years of experience within law enforcement, 25 of those being in a supervisory role in the state of Ohio. Chief Balling began his law enforcement career with the Sidney, Ohio, Police Department in 1994 and has worked through the ranks, becoming Chief in 2013. He has developed a training program for the department’s officers and dispatchers and started community programs such as the Citizens Academy, Juvenile Academy, and Coffee with a Cop. Chief Balling has presented for the Ohio Attorney General’s Office on the importance of health and wellness programs for law enforcement departments. He is an assessor and helped create the health and wellness standards for the Ohio Collaborative. Chief Balling has served as president of the Ohio Association of Chiefs of Police. He has received the Officer of the Year Award; the Life Savings Award; and, as a department, the Destination Zero and Ascension Award. He earned his master’s degree in justice administration from Tiffin University. Chief Balling graduated in 1993 with a bachelor’s degree in city administration, with a focus on criminal justice, from Wright State University.
  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    This workshop discusses other indicators of mental unwellness, focusing on police officer behavior and not just tragic outcomes. This course will contextualize how trauma manifests itself in police officer behaviors while also providing insight on how to develop mental resiliency, individually and organizationally.

    Too often mental wellness, or unwellness rather, is discussed and measured by the amount deaths by suicide an agency has or has not had. While the suicide rate among law enforcement is too high and unacceptable, that outcome is not a complete measure of how mentally well an agency's officers are. This workshop discusses other indicators of mental unwellness, focusing on police officer behavior and not just tragic outcomes. This course will contextualize how trauma manifests itself in police officer behaviors while also providing insight on how to develop mental resiliency, individually and organizationally.

    • Upon completion, participants will be able to list the categories of PTSD symptoms.
    • Upon completion, participants will be able to identify common negative police behavior that can be directly related to unprocessed trauma.
    • Upon completion, participants will be able to identify self-care strategies to implement mental resilience, individually and organizationally.

    Jesse Trevino, MS, PhD candidate

    President

    SolutionPointPlus

    Jesse is a former police detective, current social science academic, and master trainer who is an expert in policy evaluation and mental health jail diversion processes. Jesse served with the San Antonio Police Department for over 10 years. He worked on the Mental Health Unit and implemented nationally recognized programs addressing mental illness, homelessness, and chemical dependency. He went on to serve as an instructor and training coordinator at the San Antonio Police Training Academy, one of the top police academies in the nation. After promoting to detective Jesse became the threat assessment program coordinator for the Southwest Texas Fusion Center, establishing the current national model for behavioral threat assessments in law enforcement. He frequently peer-reviews grant submissions for the Department of Justice. Jesse has an AA from Northwest Vista College, a BA in Criminal Justice, and an MS in Criminal Justice and Criminology from the University of Texas at San Antonio. He is in the dissertation phase of the criminal justice program at Walden University, pursing a PhD. Jesse is the President and co-founder of SolutionPoint+, the international consulting and training firm.

    Joe Smarro

    CEO and Co-Founder

    SolutionPoint+ / San Antonio, Texas, Police Department