2022 Officer Safety and Wellness Symposium Workshops

If you missed the IACP 2022 Officer Safety and Wellness Symposium, it's not too late! Included in this package are some of the most popular workshops, covering topics from resilience to financial wellness. 

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    In this workshop, representatives from the IACP's Mass Violence Advisory Initiative discuss the mass violence incidents that affected their agencies and communities and the unanticipated challenges they faced, both in the immediate aftermath of the event and in the following months.

    Mass violence incidents present unique challenges to law enforcement leaders facing one of these events for the first time. Regardless of how much planning and preparation agencies do ahead of time, the reality is far different. In this workshop, representatives from the IACP's Mass Violence Advisory Initiative discuss the mass violence incidents that affected their agencies and communities and the unanticipated challenges they faced, both in the immediate aftermath of the event, and in the following months. These experts share lessons learned and discuss specific ways their ability to lead in the aftermath of one of these incidents would have been enhanced if they had the guidance of someone who had been through a similar experience. As our experts repeatedly tell us about these incidents, "We didn't know what we didn't know." Also during this workshop, we will introduce the concept of the Mass Violence Peer-to-Peer Advisory Team and share its mission, purpose, and unique value, including how this no-cost service addresses agency, victim, community, and survivors? mental wellbeing as they work to heal following a traumatic mass violence event.

    • Describe the unique factors and conditions that make incidents of mass violence a challenge for law enforcement leaders.
    • Discuss the needs communities have as they strive to heal following an incident of mass violence.
    • Discuss the Mass Violent Peer-to-Peer Advisory Team, its components, and its value to law enforcement and communities following an incident of mass violence.

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    Hear from leading experts in data collection, research, and program implementation around mental health that can help give agencies the catalyst they need to better serve their own officers.

    Learn how to empower the shift from raising awareness to enacting change in support of effective solutions to prevent law enforcement suicide. While progress is continually being made, there is still a significant gap in implementing evidence-based, data-driven, culturally appropriate approaches to truly combat these challenges. This panel will explore suicide prevention, intervention, and postvention. These efforts are not linear, and we must implement a process and procedures to address every piece of this complex and individualized set of circumstances. A comprehensive foundation of planning and support needs to be in place. Hear from leading experts in data collection, research, and program implementation around mental health that can help give agencies the catalyst they need to better serve their own officers.

    • Explore suicide prevention, intervention, and postvention strategies and how agencies can better support their officers.
    • Understand the FBI Law Enforcement Suicide Data Collection efforts and how your agency can become involved.
    • Discuss best practices to support officer mental health, respond to officers who may be approaching crisis, and prepare should a suicide death occur.

    Domingo Herraiz

    Domingo Herraiz has more than 38 years of government and public safety experience in dealing with local, state, and federal policies. He currently serves as the director of Programs for IACP where he oversees the Association’s work in the areas of officer safety and wellness, law enforcement officer suicide, mental health, crisis response, children and youth, criminal justice system reform, information sharing and technology, human trafficking, domestic violence and sexual assault, crime and victimization, community-police engagement, and traffic safety. Prior to joining IACP, he served as the Vice President of North America Government Affairs for Motorola Solutions, where he was responsible for public policy and federal government relations in the United States and Canada. Before joining Motorola Solutions, he served as the Presidentially appointed, U.S. Senate-confirmed director of the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) at the Department of Justice (DOJ) under President George W. Bush. As the director of BJA, he led DOJ’s largest funding and policy unit for the state, local, and tribal criminal justice issues. Prior to his role as director of the BJA, Herraiz served on Ohio Governor Bob Taft’s cabinet as the director of Criminal Justice Services. He also served as the executive director of the Ohio Crime Prevention Association.

    Tim Gardiner, MJA

    Probation and Parole Officer

    Alabama Bureau of Pardons and Parole - Retired Birmingham PD

    Tim Gardiner began his law enforcement career in 2008 with the Birmingham Police Department in Alabama. After working in patrol 5 years, he was transferred to the Community Service Division where he served as a School Resource Officer and Community Project Coordinator. In 2018, Tim was promoted to Sergeant and was assigned as Patrol and Training Supervisor, School Resource Supervisor and Adjunct Training Instructor teaching mental health, suicide awareness/intervention and officer wellness. In 2021, Tim took a position with the Alabama Bureau of Pardons and Parole as a Probation/Parole Officer working in an intensive supervision program designed to assist newly released offenders in being successful. Prior to law enforcement, Tim is a United States Marine Corps combat veteran, and served as a Volunteer Firefighter in 3 states. Tim and his wife, Season, love to travel around the world when they get free time. Tim has seen and experienced firsthand the stress and crisis our veterans and first responders go through on a continuous basis. He has continuously sought out training and opportunities to be able to help those in need. Tim teaches Law Enforcement Preventing Suicide, Officer Wellness, Mental Fitness and Mental First Aid to law enforcement agencies. Tim established the Birmingham PD Peer Support and Officer Wellness Program. He currently serves as the Alabama Law Enforcement Alliance for Peer Support Region G Coordinator, where he provides guidance and support to over 100 Certified Peer Support Team Members across 8 counties in central Alabama. He assisted in the establishment of legislation to protect peer support members in the State of Alabama. He assisted in the establishment of legislation to protect peer support members in the State of Alabama. He has advised law enforcement executives and elected officials on the topics of Officer Wellness and Mental Health.

    Lora L. Klingensmith

    Management Program Analyst, Federal Bureau of Investigation

    Jennifer Myers

    Mental Health Counselor and Violence and Trauma Training Development Manager, Education Development Center

    Christopher Scallon, MSPsy

    Founder, Owner

    Trauma Behind the Badge

    Sgt (Ret.)Christopher J.A. Scallon, MPsy, CCISM. Sergeant Chris Scallon retired as a 24+year veteran with the Norfolk Police Department, holds a Masters in Psychology, BS in Criminal Justice, and certified in Critical Incident Stress Management from the University of Maryland BC Emergency Health Services. He is the current National Public Safety Liaison for Shatterproof First Responders’ and Veterans’ program. He is the Founder of Survival Mindset Training and Consulting, Co-Founder of Trauma Behind the Badge. He provides direct mental health and/or substance abuse services, in addition to connecting first responders, veterans, and their families to resources. He is a current consultant/responder for the Department of Justice Antiterrorism and Emergency Assistance Program (AEAP). He was the founder, and first Director, of the Norfolk Police Department’s Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) & Peer Support Unit, Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) Co-Coordinator for the Norfolk Police Department. Sgt. Scallon is a peer and current board member of Virginia Law Enforcement Assistance Program (VALEAP), a certified peer with the West Coast Post Trauma Retreat/First Responder Support Network. Having been involved in multiple shootings he is intimately familiar with trauma and the consequences of exposure. Former Director of Public Safety Support for Chateau Recovery.
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    As wellness programs evolve and grow across the police profession, it is critical that agencies adapt a broad scope of programmatic elements to support the wellbeing of their officers. Resilience is a key component of wellness and evidence-based practices can be easily integrated into established wellness and peer support programs.

    As wellness programs evolve and grow across the police profession, it is critical that agencies adapt a broad scope of programmatic elements to support the wellbeing of their officers. Resilience is a key component of wellness and evidence-based practices can be easily integrated into established wellness and peer support programs. During this session, attendees will hear from law enforcement leaders on their decision to explore resilience programming for their agencies, why resilience is an important component of wellness, and how agencies can take simple steps to integrate resilience into agency culture, from the academy to regular in-service training.

    • Attendees will learn about evidence-based resilience practices.
    • Attendees will learn how to integrate resilience into agency culture.
    • Attendees will learn strategies to implement resilience practices in academy and in-service training settings.

    Jennifer Styles

    Program Manager

    IACP

    Jennifer Styles is a Program Manager at the International Association of Chiefs of Police. She is an experienced criminal justice grant manager with a strong ability to translate the needs of the field into tangible resources, services, and trainings. Ms. Styles specializes in community-police relations, officer safety and wellness, pretrial justice, volunteer management, emergency preparedness, and tribal and smaller agency issues. Ms. Styles currently oversees IACP’s portfolio of officer safety and wellness work to include the Officer Safety and Wellness Symposium, National Consortium on the Prevention of Law Enforcement Suicide, Innovative Approaches to Officer Safety and Wellness, VALOR Law Enforcement Resilience Training Program, National Peer Support Program for Small and Rural Agencies, and Law Enforcement Family Wellness Training and Technical Assistance Program. 

    Karmen Clay-Tyler, PsyD

    Director of Staff Wellness & Clinical Services

    Cook County Sheriff's Office

    Dr. Karmen Clay-Tyler is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist and earned her doctoral degree from the Illinois School of Professional Psychology in 2015. She also has a master’s degree in Forensic Psychology and over 15 years of experience providing mental health services, many of which in the juvenile and adult correctional settings. Her interests shifted from the inmate population to that of law enforcement after noticing the various stressors that co-exist for staff working within these settings. Currently, Dr. Clay-Tyler serves as the Director of Staff Wellness and Clinical Services at the Cook County Sheriff’s Office (Chicago). Her career with the sheriff’s office began in 2017 with the Department of Corrections (Cook County Jail) where she served as a Director within the Inmate Programs and Services Department. In 2019, she was selected to join the Bureau of Human Resources as the sheriff’s office aimed to identify additional programs and resources to better support and promote staff wellness. To date, she is working alongside colleagues on the launch of a formal staff wellness unit. She is also a course instructor within the training academy and facilitates mental health trainings for sheriff’s office police recruits. Dr. Clay-Tyler is a member of the American Psychological Association (APA), the APA Division 18 Psychologists in Public Service, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), and the Society for Police and Criminal Psychology (SPCP). She is also a co-author of Pandemic, Protests, and Purpose: Police Psychology in a Time of Great Need (2020) and studied the Psychological Characteristics of Police Officers Referred for Multiple Fitness for Duty Evaluations (2015) in completion of her Clinical Research Project. Her professional interests include the completion of Pre-Employment and Fitness for Duty Evaluations. She also hopes to seek board certification in Police and Public Safety Psychology within the near future.

    Richard Creamer

    Sergeant

    Norfolk, Virginia, Police Department

    Sergeant Rich Creamer is a 20-year veteran of the Norfolk Police Department and is currently assigned to the Norfolk Police Department's Training Division, where he is responsible for the development, maintenance, and instruction of courses related to Critical Incident Stress Management and Peer Support. Sergeant Creamer also provides CISM/Peer Support services to the Norfolk Police Department as well as other emergency services agencies throughout the region while developing an evolving-based vision and mission for the Norfolk Police Department to reflect trends in public safety mental health and wellness. Sgt. Creamer currently works with the International Association of Chiefs of Police and University of Penn in the development and delivery of VALOR- Resiliency in Law Enforcement curriculum. Prior to his current assignment, Sgt. Creamer held a leadership position in the Criminal Intelligence Unit and has extensive experience in violent crime investigations and criminal street gangs. Sergeant Creamer holds both a Bachelor's degree from Old Dominion University in Sociology and a Master's degree from Liberty University in Human Services Counseling.  

    Chelley Seibert, MEd

    Training and Community Engagement Coordinator

    Dayton Police Department

    Chelley Seibert is the Training and Community Engagement Coordinator with the Dayton Police Department. She assists newly graduated police recruits in their first year transition to police officer. She monitors their work/life balance and measures their job burnout rate. Chelley is a retired Dayton Police Officer after 25 years of service. Her assignments included Patrol, Crime Prevention Specialist, Public Information Officer, Academy Instructor and Training Coordinator. She is a Diversity Instructor, Certified Physical Fitness Instructor and Subject Matter Expert in Instructor Skills Development thru the State of Ohio. Chelley was the first female recruit in Dayton Police history to be awarded the Top Firearms Award (“Top Gun”) and was named the Dayton Police Officer of the Year in 2011. Chelley was a speaker at the TEDxDayton in 2015, and the WINxChicago Law Enforcement event in 2016. She currently serves as a speaker coach for TEDxDayton Speakers Committee. She has also presented both locally and nationally in universities, police academies, hospitals, churches and at the International Law Enforcement Educators and Trainers Association (ILEETA). Chelley received her Bachelors Degree in Music Education from Miami University and Master of Education Degree – School Counseling from Wright State University. She is currently enrolled in the Master of Science Clinical Counseling program starting this fall. In addition, Chelley is a drummer in the band Frozen Feet of Dayton. She has served as a choir director for the TRU Choir in Cincinnati, is a member of the World House Choir in Yellow Springs and a singer/songwriter/keynote speaker in the Positive Music Industry. She was also a member of the World Champion Garfield Cadets Drum and Bugle Corps. She has completed several marathons, including running up Pikes Peak, and has competed as a distance runner in both the Ohio and International Police and Fire Olympics.

    Eric Tobin

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    This presentation explores the role spiritual wellness plays in following basic principles of integrity, values, ethics, and morals, and discusses various aspects of being spiritually well and its critical role in officer wellness.

    Amidst the growing conversation around officer wellness, spiritual wellness is often left out. The stressful and frequently dangerous nature of the job places a burden on officers that most people never endure. Law enforcement is regularly called upon to deal with hurting and distressed citizens, which can lead to a negative perception of the world. This, coupled with the COVID crisis, public demand for services, declining resources, and a critical atmosphere, has placed increased pressure on officers and their families. This presentation explores the role spiritual wellness plays in following basic principles of integrity, values, ethics, and morals, and discusses various aspects of being spiritually well and its critical role in officer wellness.

    • Participants will identify various aspects of spirituality that include but are not limited to religion.
    • Through real-life examples, participants will see the valuable role of spiritual wellness in officer health and wellness.
    • Participants will understand the broad definition of spiritual wellness and the many aspects of being spiritual.

    Iva Rody, M.A.

    Associate Director

    National Center For Prevention of Community Violence

    Throughout her career, Iva Rody has continued to serve as an advocate in both the government and private sectors. Mrs. Rody has a Bachelor of Science in Administration of Justice, a Master of Administration and has been successful at developing and implementing multiple law enforcement-based and community programs. Often, Mrs. Rody is called upon to provide training and professional development on current trends and best practices in Officer Wellness, Mental Health, Domestic Violence, Crisis Intervention, and Advocacy. She is a graduate of the Arizona POST Leadership Program and serves as a committee member for the International Association of Chiefs of Police Victim Services Committee, the National Center for Prevention of Community Violence and the Federal Bureau of Investigations ELEVATE Committee. Ms. Rody serves as faculty at Arizona State University, has extensive experience in program management, and serves as a peer reviewer for the US Department of Justice. Ms. Rody has been recognized by the Arizona Attorney General for Distinguished Service in recognition of Outstanding Leadership and the IACP Excellence in Victim Services Award. In her role, Ms. Rody regularly leads solutions-based programming for the nation's first responder community where she emphasizes the importance of holistic wellness for public safety personnel and their families. Ms. Rody often engages innovative technology to promote access to critical resources that improve and support those she serves.

    Bobby Kipper

    Executive Director/Retired Police Officer

    National Center for Prevention of Community Violence

    Bobby Kipper is a Wall Street Journal and USA Today Bestselling author with over four decades of experience in both the public and private sector. Bobby's journey began with a successful twenty-six-year career with the Newport News Virginia Police Department. Following his local law enforcement service, he served as the Director of the Gang Reduction Program for the Office of the Attorney General of Virginia for 4 years. In addition, he served as a school safety and discipline specialist with the Virginia Department of Education for 4 years. He went on to start a successful national consulting company focusing on training and technical assistance for both public and private industry. In 2009 Bobby founded the National Center for Prevention of Community Violence which currently serves communities and schools across America in an effort to interrupt the process of violence through proven solutions. Bobby's efforts have been recognized by local, state, and national leaders for his consistent approach to positive community change at the public and private levels. He has been awarded the FBI Director’s award for the Fight Against Crime in America as well as he was recognized for Outstanding Contribution to Law Enforcement on three separate occasions. His work has been featured on: CSPAN, National Public Radio, Fox News Network, MSNBC, USA Today, the Wall Street Journal and a number of local and regional media outlets. Bobby has served as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Memphis and the University of North Florida. He is called to provide keynote and conference presentations both nationally and internationally and his current bestselling book “Performance Driven Thinking” is being highlighted as a pathway for improving performance in public and private organizations across America.
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    This presentation addresses underlying issues inhibiting good sleep and offers practical, real-world strategies and activities to improve an officer's quality of sleep.

    Lack of sleep poses significant health risks to an officer's wellbeing and job performance. Disrupted sleep is a symptom of, and exacerbates posttraumatic stress injury. Poor sleep impairs cognitive functioning and heightens emotional reactivity, leading to errors in judgment and poor decision-making in the field. When reaction time is increased, officer safety is jeopardized. This presentation addresses underlying issues inhibiting good sleep and offers practical, real-world strategies and activities to improve an officer's quality of sleep. Specific actions to improve pre-sleep routines, guidelines for organizing one's sleep space to promote more restful sleep, and means for coping with nightmares and disruptive dreams are detailed. The use of medications and other sleep aids will be discussed.

    • Detail activities that promote good sleep hygiene.
    • Organize their sleep space to improve sleep quality.
    • Identify and apply tools to reduce the impact of disruptive dreams and nightmares.

    Kathryn Hamel, PhD

    Chief Executive Officer

    Hecht Trauma Institute

    Dr. Kathryn Hamel, Ph.D., is the Chief Executive Officer of The Hecht Trauma Institute. Dr. Hamel served our communities for 25 years as a law-enforcement professional for two mid-size Police Departments. During her career in Law Enforcement, she obtained experience in personnel, training, homeland security, criminal investigations, leadership and management, ultimately earning the rank of Lieutenant. During her time spent as a detective, Dr. Hamel investigated hundreds of cases involving rape, domestic assault, child sexual abuse and other forms of violence. Her caseload enabled her to assist victims of these traumatic events navigate the criminal justice system while seeking justice on their behalf. Preparing for a post-Law Enforcement career, she earned a doctorate in Public Safety Leadership from Capella University, and a Master’s Degree in Criminal Justice from Chapman University. Transitioning from law enforcement to academia, she assumed a leadership role at a University. In this capacity, she served as the Dean of the School of Criminal Justice and Criminology and later as the Senior Vice-President of Human Resources and Organizational Development. A committed community volunteer, she has almost three decades of experience in guiding non-profit and charitable organizations, and is currently a Board Member of KinderVision, a nonprofit co-founded by her late mother, Ashby Sebastian. As the current Chief Executive Officer of the Hecht Trauma Institute, she continues to mentor and empower her staff, as she enhances and enriches its Servant Leadership culture.

    Kevin Connors, MS, LMFT

    Senior Vice-President, Program Development

    Hecht Trauma Institute

    Kevin J. Connors, MS, MFT is the Senior Vice President for Program Development at the Hecht Trauma Institute in Costa Mesa, California creating trainings for clinicians, first responders, and others treating interpersonal trauma. Kevin is a licensed Marriage & Family Therapist in private practice in Long Beach, California, specializing in treating: dissociative disorders and complex post-traumatic stress disorder. Kevin is a frequent national and international presenter on complex trauma and dissociative disorders. He is co-author of Treating Complex Trauma and Dissociation: A practical guide to navigating therapeutic challenges. Kevin is a Member-at-Large on the Board of Directors of the National Partnership to End Interpersonal Violence. He is a Fellow and Past President of the International Society for the Study of Trauma and Dissociation. He also serves as Co-Chair of the Institute on Violence, Abuse, & Trauma’s International Summit Planning Committee’s Adult Survivors of Childhood Maltreatment Track.

    Kelli Ellis

    Founder - Designer

    Kelli Ellis Designs

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    Learn how leaders can inadvertently worsen or aggravate trauma within their ranks, and how they can serve as trauma-informed change agents, help save the lives of officers, and lead the way towards healing and post-traumatic growth.

    Law enforcement professionals are exposed to very high levels of trauma, uniquely different from what people outside the profession experience. Attendees will learn how trauma impacts police work, how officers and their families are affected by trauma, and how to become a trauma-informed leader. Learn how leaders can inadvertently worsen or aggravate trauma within their ranks, and how they can serve as trauma-informed change agents, help save the lives of officers, and lead the way towards healing and post-traumatic growth. Attendees are provided solution-focused roadmaps for trauma-informed police leadership, including how trauma-informed leadership is a vital source of strength, stability, and support during extremely difficult and challenging times.

    • Describe three key features of strong trauma-informed leadership for law enforcement professionals.
    • Identify three key pitfalls to avoid in trauma-informed police leadership.
    • Understand the impact of trauma on police and how to transform that impact into opportunities for growth.

    David Black, Chief Psychologist California Police Chiefs Assoc. Wellness Committee / Ph.D. Clinical Psychology / Licensed Psychologist (CA)

    CEO and Chief Psychologist

    CORDICO

    Dr. David Black is the Founder and CEO of CORDICO, serving hundreds of law enforcement agencies nationally. He is the Chief Psychologist of the California Police Chiefs Association Wellness Committee, and a Founding Board Member of the National Sheriffs Association Psychological Services Group. Dr. Black is also an Advisory Board Member for the National Police Foundation’s Center for Mass Violence Response Studies, serves on the IACP Police Psychological Services Ethics Committee, serves on the National Fraternal Order of Police Officer Wellness Committee and Provider Evaluation Subcomittee, and is an Officer Wellness subject matter expert for the California Commission on POST. Dr. Black has been serving law enforcement since 2002.

    Neil Gang

    Chief of Police

    Pinole, California, Police Department

    Police Chief Neil H. Gang has served in law enforcement for over 32 years and has been the Chief of Police for the Pinole Police Department since 2014. He is the Chair of the California Police Chiefs Association Officer Wellness and Resiliency Committee, the author of the Asher Model-7 Point Approach to a Culture of Wellness, the host of the 6th Pillar Podcast and was named Public Safety Hero of the Year by the House of representatives in 2020.

    His innovative work as a law enforcement leader has been featured by the IACP in Police Chief magazine. He is the graduate of the prestigious Northwestern School of Police Staff Command, where he was both the president of the class and the recipient of the Franklin M. Kremel Award for excellence in the field of leadership.

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    The purpose of the program was to help officers improve their nutritional knowledge and learn healthier eating habits, especially as they handle stressful calls, long hours, varying shifts, and overall cumulative stress.

    The holistic wellness program, STEPP, is based on the concept that overall wellness should encompass all facets of our lives. The acronym STEPP includes: Support Systems, Tactical Knowledge & Skills, Emotional Well-being, Physical Health and Personal & Financial Stability. One of the biggest obstacles first responders face is maintaining healthy nutritional habits. The Miami Beach Police Department in Florida was awarded a grant to create a six month nutrition pilot program. The purpose of the program was to help officers improve their nutritional knowledge and learn healthier eating habits, especially as they handle stressful calls, long hours, varying shifts and overall cumulative stress. Goal was to assess and evaluate this program in order to create a departmental nutrition program that could be combined with a physical fitness program.

    • Upon completion, the participant will be able to define the purpose of a nutrition program and why it is necessary for first responders.
    • Upon completion, the participant will be able to demonstrate how nutritional knowledge and healthy eating behaviors can be implemented in your wellness program designed to improve physical health.
    • Upon completion, the participant will be able to list the steps their department would need to take to implement a successful nutrition program ? including research, selection, implementation, cost analysis and evaluation.

    Elise S. Taylor, PsyD

    Lieutenant/Clinical Psychologist Training Unit

    Miami Beach, Florida, Police Department

    Lieutenant Elise Spina Taylor is a 25-year veteran of the City of Miami Beach Police Department. While working full-time for the police department, Elise completed her Doctorate degree in Clinical Psychology and obtained her Florida License, in 2008. Currently she is the Commander of the Training Unit and Hostage Negotiations Team, the Psychology Consultant and administrator of the Peer Support Team and Department Wellness Program. Elise has over 17 years of investigative experience, working assignments in the Criminal Investigative Division (CID) - Property Crimes and the Homicide - Major Crimes Unit. She later returned to CID at the rank of Lieutenant and was assigned to the Street Crimes Unit, which includes Robbery, Narcotics, Human Trafficking and the Crime Suppression Team. When Elise was promoted to the rank of Sergeant, she was assigned to the Entertainment District - Ocean Drive Squad and then was assigned to the Internal Affairs Unit. Prior to joining the Police Department, Elise was an English teacher and school counselor in the Miami-Dade public school system. Her education and experience have been a great foundation in managing the department wellness and training programs.

    Noel Castillo, PhD

    Officer/Training Unit

    Miami Beach, Florida, Police Department

    Ofc. Noel A. Castillo has worked in the law enforcement/correctional field for the past twenty-five years. As a police officer with a sound academic background, he has conducted and assisted with research in the areas of body worn cameras, officer wellness, use of force and juvenile issues. Noel has received awards for his work as a Hostage Negotiator, Training Officer and for the implementation of community outreach programs. Noel has a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice from Florida International University, Master of Public Administration from Barry University, and a PhD in Criminal Justice from Nova Southeastern University. He is a US Army veteran.

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    The policing profession has begun to see a significant shift in their approach and response to both officer and community alcohol and prescription drug use. As departments become more informed in addressing and assisting the communities with these issues, they in turn learn how to better serve their own officers, who may be presented with similar challenges.

    Law enforcement responsibilities place unique challenges and pressure on those who serve their community. The build-up of physical, psychological, and emotional demands can take a toll on an officer's well-being. In extreme situations, officers may turn to alcohol and prescription drugs for pain or stress management. Although these may provide temporary relief, they can lead to misuse that may cause new or worse problems later. The policing profession has begun to see a significant shift in their approach and response to both officer and community alcohol and prescription drug use. As departments become more informed in addressing and assisting the communities with these issues, they in turn learn how to better serve their own officers, who may be presented with similar challenges.

    • Explore the relationship between how alcohol and prescription drug misuse affect the community and those within the law enforcement profession.
    • Learn how one department has implemented innovative responses to officers who may be struggling with substance misuse.
    • Identify risk factors and warning signs of alcohol and substance misuse and explore ways to encourage conversation on the topics.

    Megan Dent-Carman

    Project Manager

    International Association of Chiefs of Police

    Megan Dent-Carman is a project manager at the IACP. She oversees two projects within IACP's Officer Safety and Wellness Program - The National Consortium on Preventing Law Enforcement Suicide and Innovative Approaches to Strengthening Officer Wellness. Prior to joining the IACP in February 2021, Megan served as a police officer for five years.

    Walter McNeil

    Sheriff

    Leon County Sheriff's Office

    Walter. A. McNeil was elected Sheriff of Leon County in November 2016. In his distinguished 40-year career as a public servant, Walter McNeil has led the fight against crime in Tallahassee, has been tapped to lead two state agencies under former Gov. Charlie Crist, and has advised the Obama White House and other governments around the globe on law enforcement strategies and tactics. From 2008-2011, his three years as Corrections Secretary, he put in place Florida's first prison reentry programs, reducing the inmate recidivism rate by nearly 5%. For 10 years at the helm of the Tallahassee Police Department, Chief McNeil was recognized for his progressive voice and his effective response to citizen concerns. His community policing efforts to control gangs, drugs and juvenile crime earned him numerous honors, including the Tallahassee NAACP Humanitarian Award, Public Sector Business Person of the Year and the United States DEA Award. In 2012 he was selected to serve on the advisory group that met with Vice President Biden to discuss gun violence. As President of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, Chief McNeil traveled to foreign countries to discuss methods to combat terrorism, human trafficking, cyber-crimes and other 21st century concerns that may impact global security and policing issues. McNeil has chaired the Heart Walk for the county chapter of the American Heart Association, been honorary co-chair of Leon's March of Dimes Walk America campaign, and serves on numerous boards; Southside Rotary Club, Greater Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce, Fellowship of Christian Athletes, Big Bend Minority Chamber of Conference, Boys Town North Florida and the Refuge House. The Sheriff and his family are active members of New Mount Zion AME Church.

    Sara Metz, PsyD

    Owner

    Code-4 Counseling, LLC

    Dr. Sara Metz is a licensed psychologist in the state of Colorado specializing in psychological support services for emergency responders and their families. In 2016, she was honored to be the recipient of the American Psychological Association Eileen Gupton Award for Early Career Contributions in Police and Public Safety Psychology. In 2017, Sara opened her own firm, Code-4 Counseling, LLC. Code-4 Counseling, LLC has grown quickly over the past 4.5 years and Sara, along with her growing team of clinicians, now serve agencies throughout the state of Colorado providing wellness checks, counseling, training, critical incident response, and wellness program assessments. In 2019, Dr. Metz partnered with CSU Global to develop a fully specialized counseling program, one of the first of its kind in the country, for those wishing to specialize in providing support to military and responder personnel. The program officially launched in September 2020 and more than 90 students are now enrolled. In addition to her work with Code-4 Counseling and CSU Global, Sara further serves the responder community as an Executive Board Member of the Colorado Fallen Hero Foundation, the AT&T FirstNet Responder Wellness Coalition, and the It’s a Calling Foundation.

    Dan Brite

    Wellness Coordinator

    Douglas County Sheriff's Office

    Dan Brite is a U.S. Marine Corps veteran and has been in Law Enforcement for 21 years. In 2016, he was shot in the line of duty and died twice at the hospital. The injury resulted in permanent paralysis. His biggest struggle wasn't from the physical pain from the significant injuries, but the mental anguish from years in the profession and suffering such a life changing event. Dan is a huge advocate for mental health improvements in first responders and their families. He runs his agency wellness program, as well as, assists other agencies across the nation with builidng wellness programs. Dan is a subject matter expert with IACP in building wellness programs. He has his bachelor's in organizational leadership and is currently in the Military and First Responder Pscyhology Master's Program, through Colorado State University. This program is the first of its kind in the nation and it aims to create culturally competent therapists to help the military and first responder professions. Dan's wife, Christy, is a Sergeant with the same agency and they have two beautiful daughters. Dan's sidekick, Fergus, is a 4 year old giant schnauzer doddle service dog for him and a therapy dog for his agency.
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    Chief Daniel Thompson discusses the mental health and wellness impacts of the event on Waukesha Police Department, peer responding agencies, and the community.

    On November 21, 2021, tragedy struck the community of Waukesha, Wisconsin, when the driver of a vehicle drove through the Waukesha Christmas Parade, striking parade goers and resulting in the death of six and injury of 67 people. Chief Daniel Thompson discusses the mental health and wellness impacts of the event on Waukesha Police Department, peer responding agencies, and the community. Chief Thompson and panelists address building resilience, leadership, resources, and relationships as the cornerstones in response to and recovery from traumatic events.

    Laura Wilt

    Program Manager

    IACP

    Laura Wilt is a Program Manager on the IACP Programs Team currently responsible for overseeing the successful delivery of all training and technical assistance activities of the Collaborative Reform Initiative Technical Assistance Center (CRI-TAC) to agencies across the nation. Since joining the IACP eight years ago, Laura has worked on the IACP Programs and IACP Member Engagement Teams focused on the implementation and delivery of projects, training, and technical assistance initiatives aimed at providing practical tools, education, and support to the policing field. Areas of focus in her portfolio of work have included victim services, trauma-informed training, officer safety and wellness, multi-collaborative partnerships, juvenile justice, community-police relations, women in law enforcement, and leadership. She has supported federal grant awards from diverse funders including OJJDP, OVC, and the COPS Office. Before becoming a team member with the IACP, Laura served as Crisis Manager and Training Coordinator at the Arlington, VA based non-profit, CrisisLink, centered on crisis intervention and suicide prevention.  

    Steve Caballero

    Law Enforcement Coordinator

    US Attorney's Office Eastern District of WI.

    Steve Caballero is the Law Enforcement Coordinator for the U.S. Attorney's Office, Eastern District of Wisconsin. Mr. Caballero is tasked with facilitating and promoting coordination, communication, and cooperation among federal, state, local and tribal law enforcement agencies in his district. He retired from the Milwaukee Police Department after 25 years reaching the rank of Assistant Chief.

    Daniel Thompson, MA

    Organizational Leadership and Administration

    Concordia University

    Chief Daniel Thompson began his law enforcement career with the Milwaukee Police Department in 1991. During his time in patrol, he was selected for special assignments with the Gang Squad and Metro Drug Unit. In 1999, he was promoted to Detective. As a Detective, he worked for five years in HIDTA (High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area). This task force is a federally funded group of Detectives and Officers from both federal and local agencies to target drug trafficking organizations. He was also selected to become a member of the Milwaukee Hazardous Devices Unit (Bomb Squad), which is a 24/7 365 day on-call commitment. Chief Daniel then worked in the Homicide Unit for approximately five years. He was a Task Force Agent assigned full-time to the FBI Joint Terrorism Task Force in disrupting and dismantling international and domestic terrorist threats. When he was promoted to Lieutenant, he was assigned to the Intelligence Fusion Division and became the Director for STAC (Southeastern Wisconsin Threat Analysis Center). In addition, he was assigned to the Homicide Unit as a Lieutenant. He was then promoted to Captain and led the Fusion Division in leveraging technology and partnerships with state, federal, and local agencies, as well as the private sector. In 2019, Thompson was promoted to the Inspector of Police and oversaw operations of the City of Milwaukee. He was also assigned to manage and lead the team to host the 2020 Democratic National Convention. On May 4th, 2020 Thompson was sworn in as Chief of Police for the City of Waukesha. His personal and professional accomplishments include being a certified public manager Wisconsin Command College Class Six), and a certified professional manager. He also has a master’s degree in Organizational Leadership.

    David Kennington, MA, LPC, MHSP

    Behavior Health Services Assistant Manager

    Metropolitan Nashville, Tennessee, Police Department

    David Kennington is a Licensed Professional Counselor employed by the Metropolitan Nashville Police Department (MNPD) since 2007. He manages The Professional Wellness Section, which was cited as a model officer wellness program in a 2019 Department of Justice Congressional Report. The Professional Wellness Section has 2 Units (Counseling and Wellness) with multiple programs including, training, critical incident stress management, psychotherapy, peer support, family support, and chaplain support. The Professional Wellness Section is comprised of both sworn and civilian employees.  He provides therapy to law enforcement personnel and their families, is a certified officer wellness instructor and leads critical incident stress debriefings. He has over 30 years of experience working as a clinical psychotherapist. He recently served on Officer Safety and Wellness Panels at the Department of Justice. He has a B.A. in Psychology from The University of Texas at Austin (1988) and a M.A. in Professional Counseling from The University of Texas at Tyler (1994). David has been married to Korree for 23 years. They have 2 sons, Collin (20) and Cooper (16). 

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Wellness and physical fitness are crucial components of law enforcement training and support. Research continues to prove the value, highlighting the many ways that wellness and fitness can increase job readiness, safety, health, and longevity.

    Wellness and physical fitness are crucial components of law enforcement training and support. Research continues to prove the value, highlighting the many ways that wellness and fitness can increase job readiness, safety, health, and longevity. While many agencies recognize the critical need for training and support programs, some face challenges with implementing them. This workshop will help agencies of all sizes and demographics overcome those challenges and succeed. Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) Joe Dulla and Mandy Nice will team together with the IACP to host this engaging and interactive workshop. They will address pivotal fitness and wellness needs for members of law enforcement, introduce the IACP?s Health & Wellness Assessment Tool and Action Planning Roadmap, and guide attendees through a ?practice session? so that they can become comfortable and confident using the Roadmap for their respective agencies. The professional guidance, resources, best practices, and positive support provided during this workshop will pave the way for attendees to implement safe, practical, user-friendly, results-focused wellness and fitness training and support programs that are truly best-in-class.

    • Recognize common challenges agencies face when implementing a fitness and wellness program and learn how to proactively combat these challenges.
    • Understand the importance of conducting a needs assessment and how to do so using the Health & Wellness Assessment Tool and Action Planning Roadmap.
    • Establish goals and steps to build and enhance your department?s fitness and wellness program based on the results of the Health & Wellness Assessment Tool and Action Planning Roadmap.

    Joseph Dulla

    Interim Associate Dean of Fire Technology

    Santa Ana College

    Joe Dulla has served in first responder roles for over 39 years. He has worked as an emergency medical technician, lifeguard, rescue boat operator, mountain rescue, and law enforcement officer. After 31 years of service with the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, Joe recently retired where he worked, custody, patrol, investigative, task force, training & technical assignments in various sworn ranks and positions. For his last 4 and a half years, Joe served as academy director overseeing the training of over 1,400 recruits per year. He is a member and served as chairman of the California POST Physical Training Program S.M.E. Group, Los Angeles County Human Performance Workgroup, as well as Job Task Analysis and Return to Work committees. He also managed the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department’s “Fast Track Injury Care” program that utilizes Sports Medicine concepts to reduce time lost to injuries, enhance wellness, and optimize employee performance. Joe has also taught and served in faculty positions at the undergraduate and graduate levels for courses in Public Policy, Public Personnel, Organizational Behavior, Leadership, Tactical Sports Medicine, at five universities. 

    He holds TSAC‑F certification with distinction from the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), has presented locally, nationally, and internationally on the physical demands of law enforcement patrol personnel, wellness, injury and rapid return to work, written articles for the Tactical Strength and Conditioning Journal, and co-authored over 20 articles for peer-reviewed journals and other periodicals. Joe is currently the Interim Associate Dean of Fire Technology at Santa Ana College where he oversees a portfolio including Fire Technology, Physical Fitness for Public Safety Personnel, the Basic Fire Academy, Fire Prevention, Fire Officer, and the SAC FIT Wellness Program. The SAC FIT Program has a 30 year history of providing cutting-edge wellness evaluations, courses, and coaching to over 30 client fire and law enforcement agencies across five Southern California counties. He is currently a Ph.D. student in the College of Health Sciences and Medicine, Tactical Research Unit, Bond University. His dissertation topic examines recruit attrition, success factors, physical abilities, injuries, costs, incumbent health, and human performance optimization.

    Mandy Nice, U.S. Army Certified Master Fitness Trainer, NSCA TSAC-F,*D, NSCA CPT,*D, FMSC-L2, NPTI-MPT

    Tactical Program Manager: Public Safety

    The National Strength and Conditioning Association

    Mandy Nice has over 15 years of experience developing and implementing physical fitness and wellness programs that measurably improve the strength and resilience of tactical athletes and civilians. Her science-based, results-focused approach has consistently produced positive results that have earned national-level awards for measurably improving employee health, fitness, and quality-of-life. Mandy actively serves as a guest speaker at state, national and international law enforcement conferences to help share scalable best practices for sustainable success. To further support agencies, Mandy also serves as the Tactical Program Manager of the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA). She is responsible for fully equipping members of law enforcement and fire/rescue with the essential research, training, tools, and resources to establish safe tactical athletic programs that optimize job readiness while reducing injury risk. Mandy’s greatest motivator is helping members of law enforcement and fire/rescue optimize their fitness and health so that they can enjoy strong, rewarding careers and long, healthy retirements.