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View Individual 2021 Annual Conference Workshops

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    This panel provided perspectives from smaller, rural serving, and statewide agencies who have sought assistance from the COPS Office premier technical assistance center (CRI-TAC). CRI-TAC provides customized technical assistance for law enforcement agencies seeking to enhance their implementation strategies and programs to meet the needs of the field.

    Law enforcement agencies across the country are encountering challenges in recruitment, hiring, retention, and training. Small agencies can be an incubator for innovation, agencies serving rural communities must reimagine services, and statewide agencies seek to meet fluctuating demands within dispersed geographic regions. Agencies of all types are challenging the status quo through implementing creative and flexible solutions. This panel provided perspectives from smaller, rural serving, and statewide agencies who have sought assistance from the COPS Office premier technical assistance center (CRI-TAC). CRI-TAC provides customized technical assistance for law enforcement agencies seeking to enhance their implementation strategies and programs to meet the needs of the field.

    • Describe barriers to effective recruitment, hiring and retention strategies.
    • Recognize strategies to diversify recruitment and hiring efforts.
    • Identify lessons learned from recruitment, hiring, and retention challenges and successes.

    Nazmia Comrie

    Senior Program Specialist, COPS Office

    Nazmia E.A. Comrie is a senior program specialist in the Resources and Technical Assistance (RTA) division at the U.S. Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office). Nazmia provides leadership for the development, implementation, and delivery of technical assistance efforts to state, local, tribal, and campus law enforcement agencies across the county as the program manager for the Collaborative Reform Initiative. She is an issue manager for issues related to human trafficking, hate crimes, interpersonal violence, and mass demonstrations, and has expertise in officer wellness and safety and youth safety. To date Nazmia has authored and coauthored a number of publications relevant to her areas of expertise and the criminal justice field as a whole, including Building Stronger, Safer Communities: A guide for law enforcement and community partners to prevent and respond to hate crimes. In addition Nazmia was a significant contributor to the After-Action Assessment of the Police Response to the August 2014 Demonstrations in Ferguson, Missouri report that was released in 2015. Nazmia received her bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of Rochester and her master's degree in criminal justice from University at Albany, where she worked on research involving homicides, wrongful convictions, community policing, and gangs. 

    John Batiste

    Chief

    Chief John R. Batiste is the 21st Chief of the Washington State Patrol originally appointed in 2005. On January 16, 2017, Governor Jay Inslee reappointed Chief Batiste to continue to lead the Washington State Patrol. He oversees the day-to-day operations and manages the agency?s six bureaus: Commercial Vehicle Enforcement, Field Operations, Fire Protection, Forensic Laboratory Services, Investigative Services, and Technical Services. Chief Batiste began his career with the Washington State Patrol in March 1976. He has promoted through the ranks of sergeant, lieutenant, captain, and deputy chief. Chief Batiste obtained his Bachelor?s Degree in Law Enforcement Administration from City University and is a graduate of Northwestern University?s Center for Public Safety School and Police Staff and Command, as well as a graduate of the Federal Bureau of Investigation?s National Executive Institute. Chief Batiste has been involved in a variety of activities and organizations to numerous to name, participating as an Executive Board Member for many boards and organizations.

    Jeff Caponera

    Chief

    Grafton, WI, Police Department

    Chief Caponera is a 26-year law enforcement professional. He retired as Chief of Police from the City of Anna, Texas Police Department in August 2020 after serving the Anna community for over 12 years. He currently serves as the Chief of Police for the Grafton, Wisconsin Police Department. Chief Caponera graduated Summa Cum Laude from Regis University in Denver, Colorado with a BS in Public Administration. He is a graduate of the FBI National Academy, Session 276 and the 53rd Session of the Institute for Law Enforcement Administration?s School of Executive Leadership. Chief Caponera?s certifications include instructor, crisis negotiator, field training officer and supervisor, master peace officer (Texas) and grant writer. Chief Caponera is an active member of the FBI National Academy Associates (Wisconsin Chapter). He was a member of the North Central Texas Council of Governments Criminal Justice Policy Development Committee, representing Anna and Collin County, Texas. Chief Caponera currently represents the Wisconsin Police Chiefs Association as an advisory board member for the Wisconsin Department of Justice?s Committee on Elder Abuse.

    Laura Wilt

    Program Manager

    IACP

    Laura Wilt is a Program Manager on the IACP Programs Team currently responsible for overseeing the successful delivery of all training and technical assistance activities of the Collaborative Reform Initiative Technical Assistance Center (CRI-TAC) to agencies across the nation. Since joining the IACP eight years ago, Laura has worked on the IACP Programs and IACP Member Engagement Teams focused on the implementation and delivery of projects, training, and technical assistance initiatives aimed at providing practical tools, education, and support to the policing field. Areas of focus in her portfolio of work have included victim services, trauma-informed training, officer safety and wellness, multi-collaborative partnerships, juvenile justice, community-police relations, women in law enforcement, and leadership. She has supported federal grant awards from diverse funders including OJJDP, OVC, and the COPS Office. Before becoming a team member with the IACP, Laura served as Crisis Manager and Training Coordinator at the Arlington, VA based non-profit, CrisisLink, centered on crisis intervention and suicide prevention.  

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    This conference workshop hosted a conversation with Philip Mudd, current CNN counterterrorism analyst and former deputy director of the Counterterrorist Center at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the first deputy director for the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) national security branch, and later the FBI's senior intelligence advisor, as he discusses the evolving counterterrorism threat.

    This conference workshop hosted a conversation with Philip Mudd, current CNN counterterrorism analyst and former deputy director of the Counterterrorist Center at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), the first deputy director for the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) national security branch, and later the FBI's senior intelligence advisor, as he discusses the evolving counterterrorism threat. The discussions will include how some of the pivotal global and domestic terrorism events have evolved from 9/11 to present day, the lessons learned from these events and how we prepare to combat these threats moving forward.

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    An expert panel discusses lessons learned, leading practices and cutting-edge approaches that can assist agencies in dealing with unplanned critical incidents and identify steps that police leaders can be taken before, during, and after an event that can keep an incident from becoming a crisis.

    An expert panel discussed lessons learned, leading practices, and cutting-edge approaches that can assist agencies in dealing with unplanned critical incidents and identify steps that police leaders can be taken before, during, and after an event that can keep an incident from becoming a crisis.

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    A conversation hosted by IACP's past president Cynthia Renaud with three top media representatives. This conversation assists law enforcement in gaining the perspective of news media in breaking-news situations.

    A conversation hosted by IACP's past president Cynthia Renaud with three top media representatives. This conversation assists law enforcement in gaining the perspective of news media in breaking-news situations.

    Cynthia Renaud

    IACP President, Chief of Police (Ret.), Santa Monica, California, Police Department

    After spending nearly three decades in local law enforcement, Cynthia Renaud retired as Chief of Police from the Santa Monica Police Department in October 2020.  Prior to this agency, she served as chief of the Folsom Police Department in Sacramento county for seven years, and prior to that, the Long Beach Police Department in Los Angeles County for twenty years, leaving that agency at the rank of commander.  She is currently the president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, the world’s largest and most influential professional association for police leaders with over 31,000 members across 165 countries worldwide. 

    Chief Renaud spent many years working uniformed patrol assignments and special investigations positions. Along with serving as chief in two agencies, her supervisory positions included Internal Affairs, the Field Training Program, Academy Director, Patrol Watch Commander, Communications Division Commander, Patrol Division Commander, and Investigations Division Commander. 

    Chief Renaud is a native of Long Beach. She attended California State University, Long Beach, where she completed a Bachelor’s Degree in English Literature in 1996 and a Master’s Degree in English Literature in 2000.  In 2010, she completed a second Master’s Degree in National Security Studies at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey.  Chief Renaud received the Outstanding Thesis Award for her thesis submissions in both graduate programs.

    Luke Barr

    Jack Date

    Geneva Sands

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    Learn from two well-known and respected public information officers on how they maximize their time and effort to create high quality products that resonate with communities. You will learn how to create beautiful reports, publications, social media posts, graphics, photographs and videos. Participants will walk away with a resource guide that allows them to learn the techniques in class and reinforce the material when they get back to their respective agencies.

    Over the past decade, law enforcement agencies have continued to improve their skillsets related to citizen engagement. Many police agencies need professional products, however, there is a limited budget to create stunning products that create a "wow" factor for citizens consuming the information. Learn from two well-known and respected public information officers on how they maximize their time and effort to create high-quality products that resonate with communities. This workshop demonstrated how to create beautiful reports, publications, social media posts, graphics, photographs, and videos. Participants were provided the resources to allow them to learn the techniques in class and reinforce the material when they get back to their respective agencies. This is a PIO ONE STOP SHOP.

    • Discuss the current state of public information in a police-reform era.
    • Learn how to create products specially designed to maximize community engagement.
    • Upon completion, the participant will have a "one stop shop" toolbox to assist with building trust.

    Christopher Cook

    Lieutenant, Arlington, Texas, Police Department

    Christopher Cook is an award-winning speaker and subject matter expert in the field of social media and media relations for public safety. As a Lieutenant for the Arlington Police Department, he oversees the public information office and has led the Arlington Police Department's public and media relations strategies since 2011. Lt. Cook has been interviewed numerous times on local, national, and international news networks and programs. Lt. Cook began his career in law enforcement in 1995 and has served in a variety of roles and capacities. Speaking and executive training engagements include the International Association of Chiefs of Police, National Information Officers Association, Major Cities Chiefs Association, FBI, Law Enforcement Management Institute of Texas, Texas Crime Prevention Association, Institute for Law Enforcement Administration, Caruth Police Institute, Government Social Media Conference, the Social Media Internet Law Enforcement Conference, and numerous other law enforcement centric organizations. Lt. Cook holds a Master of Arts in Criminology & Criminal Justice from the University of Texas and a Master Peace Officer Certificate from the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement. He is currently a Ph.D. student with Tarleton State University seeking a doctoral degree in Criminology. Lt. Cook was a 2012 graduate of the Bill Blackwood Law Enforcement Management Institute of Texas 67th Leadership Command College and a 2016 graduate of the Senior Management Institute for Police Session #63 from the Police Executive Research Forum. Lt. Cook was elected as Vice President of the National Information Officers Association in 2019 and will serve a 3-year term with positions of Vice President, President and Immediate Past President 2019-2022. He also serves as the Regional Vice Chair for the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) “ Public Information Officers Section. He previously chaired the IACP “ PIO Section from 2015 to 2018. Lt. Cook currently chairs the Major Cities Chiefs Association “ Public Information Officers Committee since 2018. Lt. Cook was awarded the 2018 Leadership in Public Information Management Award from the International Association of Chiefs of Police. He has also received the 2013 Connected COPS Social Media Leadership Award for his distinguished and exemplary leadership in the use of social media. Under Lt. Cook's leadership, the department received the Most Innovative Use of Social Media for three consecutive years (2012, 2013, & 2014) by the Texas Center for Digital Government. Arlington was also recognized for being the 6th Most Friendly Police Department in the nation in 2013. The term, 'tweetalong' was coined in Arlington in 2011 which is a virtual ridealong that has now been replicated in hundreds of countries around the globe. Under Lt. Cook's leadership and direction, the department received honors for the 2014 and 2015 annual reports by the International Association of Law Enforcement Planners. He leads the North Texas PIO Group with monthly luncheons to share best practices and build a strong core of future public information officers.  

    Zhivonni Cook

    Officer, Mansfield, Texas, Police Department

    Zhivonni Cook is a subject matter expert in the field of social media for law enforcement and media relations for public safety. As a sworn police officer, she oversaw the Arlington Police Department's social media platforms and citizen engagement efforts for the 48th largest city in the United States. Zhivonni led the way on content strategy and development with humanizing officers as a top priority through social media. While serving as the social media coordinator, the department had been awarded the Most Innovative Use of Social Media for three consecutive years (2012, 2013, & 2014) by the Texas Center for Digital Government.  Zhivonni began her career in law enforcement in 2000 and had served in a variety of roles and capacities. She joined the Mansfield, Texas Police Department as a sworn Public Information Officer in 2019 where she currently serves.  Zhivonni is currently a consultant for the Major Cities Chiefs Association. Speaking and executive training engagements include the International Association of Chiefs of Police, National Information Officers Association, Texas Crime Prevention Association, Law Enforcement Management Institute of Texas, Government Social Media Conference, and numerous civic clubs and law enforcement forums and agencies.  

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    An examination of how the legal doctrines of qualified immunity, Monell liability, and deliberate indifference apply to those who work with or for government agencies.

    An examination of how the legal doctrines of qualified immunity, Monell liability, and deliberate indifference apply to those who work with or for government agencies.


    Cerise Vablais

    Managing Partner

    Public Safety Psychological Services

    Dr. Vablais received her MBA from the University of Washington's Executive program in 2000 and her doctoral degree in clinical psychology from Fielding Graduate University in 2007. Her doctoral dissertation focused on the varied presentation of psychopathy in female offenders received an award from the Society for the Scientific Study of Psychopathy. She has extensive experience in forensic assessment which she gained working for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and the Maryland Department of Health & Mental Hygiene. Prior to returning to Washington in 2011, she worked as a psychologist and the Director of Mental Health for the Anne Arundel County Detention Center in Annapolis, Maryland. From 2011 ? 2015, she worked on the executive leadership team at Fairfax Hospital, an acute crisis stabilization inpatient facility.She has provided expert witness testimony in both Maryland and Washington for matters including competency to stand trial, determining criminal responsibility and involuntary civil commitment. She is currently licensed in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, California, Alaska, Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, D.C.

    Robert Faigin

    Chief Legal Advisor, San Diego County, California, Sheriff's Department

    Robert Faigin was appointed Special Assistant to the Sheriff in 2001.  He currently serves as Special Assistant/Chief Attorney to Sheriff Bill Gore.  He is responsible for providing legal advice to the Sheriff, Command Staff, and other departmental personnel.  As head of the Legal Affairs Unit, Faigin and his staff provide legal opinions, conduct research on a variety of legal issues affecting the department, review pleadings and departmental documents for legal sufficiency, and coordinate various litigation matters for County Counsel.  His current areas of emphasis include criminal law and procedure, civil rights liability, employment and labor law, detentions, and peace officer bill of rights.  Prior to joining the department, Mr. Faigin served as a Deputy District Attorney in Solano County and a Senior Deputy District Attorney in Lassen County.  As a prosecutor, he handled cases from charging to sentencing.  In Solano County, he prosecuted family violence cases including domestic violence, child and elder abuse.  In Lassen County, he prosecuted misdemeanor and general felonies including violent crimes, domestic violence, property and theft crimes.  He has tried over 50 jury trials to verdict in addition to hundreds of bench trials.  Mr. Faigin served as the State Chair of the California Peace Officers Association, Police Legal Advisors section.  He is a member of the San Diego County Bar Association, the California Peace Officers' Association, and the California State Sheriffs' Association, and is currently the chair of the IACP Legal Officers' Section  Mr. Faigin holds a Juris Doctor from Pepperdine University School of Law.  He is admitted to practice in both California and Nevada.  He holds a Master of Science in Public Administration from California State University Dominguez Hills.  He earned a Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice with a minor in Political Science from the University of Nevada Reno.  

    Oliver Stone

    Supervisory Psychologist

    Stress Management Team, Montgomery County Government

    Oliver R. Stone, Ph.D., is a licensed psychologist who graduated with a doctorate in clinical psychology from Northwestern University. Dr. Stone?s past professional experiences include working within (Federal Bureau of Prisons) and with the law enforcement community (Montgomery County Police Department), where he has supervised clinicians, developed programs, and provided oversight for delivered mental health services. Professional and research interests include police and public safety psychology, brain-behavior relationships, outcome studies, program and policy development, and the use of technology to improve clinical practice. Dr. Stone is a member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police and currently serves as the Chair of the Police Psychological Services Section?s Diversity Committee.

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    Through an agency-wide commitment to quality report-writing and accurate data collection, even the smallest departments can conduct basic crime analysis and evaluation of the impact of police operations.

    Meaningful engagement between police officers and community members can only occur when the officers are well informed on the public safety issues and concerns of a neighborhood. From such engagement comes trust and collaboration as community members and officers work together to build better, safer communities. Through an agency-wide commitment to quality report-writing and accurate data collection, even the smallest departments can conduct basic crime analysis and evaluation of the impact of police operations. Examples will be provided to show how small departments used existing personnel and basic computer technologies to create actionable analysis in support of greater community engagement.

    • Develop a localized plan for analysis-driven police and community engagement.
    • Improve data quality and create actionable analysis with limited technology and analytical capacity.
    • Support and sustain police and community collaboration toward improved public safety.

    Debra Piehl

    Senior Analytical Specialist

    IADLEST

    Debra J. Piehl Is the Senior DDACTS Analytical Specialist on Data Driven Approaches to Crime and Traffic Safety (DDACTS). Prior to that she served as the senior crime analyst in the Office of Crime Control Strategies for the New York City Police Department (NYPD). Under Commissioner Bratton she was responsible for creating the new position of ?crime analyst? as well as the selecting, hiring, training and supervising of NYPD?s first 100 civilian crime analysts. Debra served for over five years as the Compstat Director of the Massachusetts State Police. She previously served the State Police as an Intelligence Analyst Supervisor in the Commonwealth Fusion Center. Prior to joining the State Police Debra served as Director of Planning & Research at the Newton, MA Police Department where she also served as the CALEA Accreditation Manager. Debra is currently working nationally and internationally as a consultant on analysis-driven operations and CompStat. Debra was the recipient of the first annual 2019 Bryan Hill IACA Memorial Scholarship and the International Association of Crime Analysts 2017 President?s Award and was also the 2010 and 2003 recipient of the same award.

    Brett Railey

    Chief (ret)

    IADLEST

    Chief Brett C. Railey (Retired) Beginning his law enforcement career with the Florida Highway Patrol in 1977, Chief Railey has over 39 years of experience in the law enforcement field, 35 of those with the Winter Park, FL PD. In 2015 ? 2016 Chief Railey served as President for the Florida Police Chiefs Association, 3rd largest statewide police chief?s organization in the country. Chief Railey trains SME's to instruct Data Driven Approaches to Crime and Traffic Safety workshops and as a member of the International Association of Crime Analysts, teaches police executives in the Department of Justice sponsored course ?Making Effective Use of Crime Analysis?. Chief Railey consults as part of the IACP's Collaborative Reform Technical Assistance Center and consults under a contract with NHTSA. Chief Railey chaired the FPCA Highway Safety Committee and served on the IACP Highway Safety Committee. In January, 2021 he was appointed to chair the IACP?s Technical Advisory Panel for the Drug Evaluation and Classification, Advanced Roadside Impaired Driving Enforcement, and Standardized Field Sobriety Testing programs. Chief Railey serves on the Florida Impaired Driving Coalition and the Florida Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Coalition. Among his accomplishments, In 2014 Chief Railey was presented the NHTSA Public Service Lifesaver Award and was awarded the IACP J. Stannard Baker Award for lifetime achievement in highway safety, both awards being their sponsors highest recognition for highway/traffic safety excellence. Chief Railey is a 2021 recipient of the Florida Police Chiefs Association?s Wall of Honor distinction. Chief Railey has consulted on traffic safety concerns with the government of Kuwait under the United Nations Development Project and with the Brazilian National Police Force and has taught traffic safety topics in Cali Columbia, South America, Mexico and Canada. In retirement he serves as the VP of Public Safety Services for The Digital Decision.

    Peggy Schaefer

    National Certification Program Director

    International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards and Training

    Peggy Schaefer, IADLEST, NCP Program Director. Peggy Schaefer leads a dynamic and innovative team comprised of training program reviewers, content experts, and software specialists committed to ensuring that criminal justice training content and delivery methods comply with nationally accepted standards. She directs content to the appropriate expert reviewers, tracks the certification process for training providers, and helps providers improve their products. Peggy retired in 2010 as the CEO/Training Director of the North Carolina Justice Academy and oversaw the day-to-day operations and strategic vision for two campuses, a $7.2 million annual budget, and 102 employees. As the Director, she managed the entire curriculum development and dissemination of training and instructional materials to over 85,000 law enforcement professionals for basic and in-service. She holds a B.S. degree in Criminal Justice and Sociology from Guilford College and a Master?s in Public Management from UNC ? Pembroke. Peggy was sworn for 35 years with Guilford County Sheriff's Office, Greensboro, and Fayetteville NC PDs. She has four children and eleven grandchildren.

    Lance Arnold

    Chief

    Weatherford Police Department

    Lance Arnold was appointed Chief of Police for the Weatherford, Texas Police Department in June 2017. He was appointed as the Director of Public Safety in August 2020 to lead police, fire, and emergency management functions for the City. Chief Arnold served for 20 years with the Norman, Oklahoma Police Department in a variety of divisions including Patrol, Traffic, Recruiting, SWAT, Animal Welfare, and Personnel and Training. He holds a Bachelor of Liberal Studies from the University of Oklahoma, a Master of Arts in Criminal Justice from American Military University, and is pursuing his Doctor of Education in Organizational Leadership at Abilene Christian University. Chief Arnold serves on the Criminal Justice Policy Development Committee for NCTCOG, the Strategic Advisory Committee with NCT 911, and the Weatherford College Law Enforcement Academy Advisory Board. Chief Arnold is active in both the International Association of Chiefs of Police and the Texas Police Chiefs Association.

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    Learn strategies to maintain department motivation and engagement while balancing individual stressors, perspectives, and experience. Hear perspectives from a multidisciplinary team, including sworn personnel and police psychologists as they discuss common coping strategies as well as interventions for your department to enhance officer wellness and engagement.

    How do you keep your department healthy and engaged during times of anti-police sentiment? Leading a department is no easy feat let alone during times of civil unrest and a strong social movement against law enforcement. Learn strategies to maintain department motivation and engagement while balancing individual stressors, perspectives, and experience. Hear perspectives from a multidisciplinary team, including sworn personnel and police psychologists as they discuss common coping strategies as well as interventions for your department to enhance officer wellness and engagement.

    Julie Snyder, Psy.D.

    Police Psychologist, Los Angeles, California, Police Department

    Dr. Julie Snyder works with the LAPD as a Police Psychologist. She specializes in empirically supported and behaviorally based treatments and provides clinical services to law enforcement staff and consults with the Crisis Negotiation Team. Previously, Dr. Snyder has served as voluntary clinical faculty at UCLA Semel Institute. Dr. Snyder has been providing treatment for individuals in various settings for the last 15 years, specializing in substance abuse treatment and serious mental illness. Dr. Snyder completed her Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology at Pepperdine University and an APA-Accredited postdoctoral fellowship at Harbor-UCLA. She is most interested in mindfulness, self-compassion, and providing a practical approach to treatment.

    Stephanie Barone McKenny, PhD

    Police Psychologist, Los Angeles, California, Police Department

    Dr. Stephanie Barone McKenny is an LAPD police psychologist who provides consultation to several elite units including SWAT, Air Support Division, and undercover agents. She has worked with law enforcement personnel at the international, national, state, county, and local levels.  Dr. McKenny is also a Diplomate in Sports Psychology, a Nationally Certified Sports Psychologist, a Certified Trauma Professional, and she is Certified in Integrative Medicine for holistic health (mind-body-spirit).  

  • Contains 5 Component(s)

    This study is a global first and addresses the knowledge gap in our understanding of the development of PTSD, explains in what ways technology can be utilized and how evidence-based clinical interventions can be used to protect the officer before a psychological injury has occurred. This session discussed the research design, discuss ongoing challenges and report preliminary findings

    The prevalence of Occupational Stress Injuries (OSI's), including PTSD is 15+ times higher in police than in the civilian population. We are also seeing death by suicide occur at alarming rates and we must do more to protect and save the lives of our members. Currently underway with the RCMP is a massive, longitudinal study investigating PTSD that begins with cadets and follows them after deployment. This study is a global first and addresses the knowledge gap in our understanding of the development of PTSD, explains in what ways technology can be utilized and how evidence-based clinical interventions can be used to protect the officer before a psychological injury has occurred. This session discussed the research design, discuss ongoing challenges and report preliminary findings.


    • Will have a full understanding of the prevelance, persistence and human cost of OSI's in policing
    • Obtain a full understanding of the project design and participant expectations over the 10 years.
    • Will have a full understanding of the global impact of how to improve police office mental health.

    Gregory Kratzig

    Director Research and Strategic Partnerships

    Royal Canadian Mounted Police

    Gregory Kr?tzig Ph.D. is the Director Research for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and Adjunct Professor at the University of Regina Dept., of Psychology. He has been awarded grants in excess of $4M and has won many awards including the Canadian Psychological Association award for Academic Excellence, the Alumni Crowning Achievement Award for Distinguished Professional Achievement, and the Alumni of Distinction Award Campion College and has presented at INTERPOL, IITSEC, CEPOL, CPA and APS. He currently serves as the Technical Authority on the RCMP Longitudinal PTSD Study. R. Nicholas Carleton, Ph.D., R.D. Psych, is a Professor of Clinical Psychology, a registered doctoral clinical psychologist, and serves as the Scientific Director for the Canadian Institute for Public Safety Research and Treatment. He has recently been inducted as a Member of the Royal Society of Canada?s College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists, and has received the Royal-Mach-Gaensslen Prize for Mental Health Research, a Canadian Institutes of Health Research Brain Star Award. He is currently serving as the principal investigator on the RCMP Longitudinal PTSD Study.

    R. Nicholas Carleton

    Professor

    University of Regina

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    This panel focuses on managing law enforcement risk, the benefits and processes of agency accreditation, and tracking officer decertifications through the National Decertification Index.

    Risk management is a practice that seeks to identify and mitigate risk for both officers and the public. Two risk mitigation strategies law enforcement agencies can employ are (1) agency accreditation and (2) officer decertification. These methods help to ensure accountability and transparency that can enhance confidence and trust in law enforcement among community members and communities as a whole. This panel focuses on managing law enforcement risk, the benefits and processes of agency accreditation, and tracking officer decertifications through the National Decertification Index.

    • Upon completion, participant will be to able to demonstrate the importance of risk management.
    • Upon completion, participant will be able to explain the benefits of agency accreditation.
    • Participant will be able to describe how to submit to the National Decertification Index.

    Shelley Hyland

    Supervisory Program Specialist

    U.S. Department of Justice Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office)

    Shelley S. Hyland is a Supervisory Program Specialist in the Resources and Technical Assistance Division within the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS Office). She oversees a team responsible for managing Law Enforcement Mental Health and Wellness Act and Community Policing Development awards, and the Collaborative Reform Initiative Technical Assistance Center (CRI-TAC). Prior to joining the COPS Office, she was a statistician with the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS). In this role, she was the program manager for a number of law enforcement surveys, including Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS), Census of State and Local Law Enforcement Agencies, and Census of Law Enforcement Training Academies. Prior to working at BJS, she was a research and policy analyst for the Schenectady (NY) Police Department and a crime analyst for the City of Kingston (NY) Police Department. Her research interests include law enforcement management and operations, community policing, use of force, crime analysis and pre-employment screening. She holds a Ph.D. in Criminal Justice from the University at Albany-SUNY.

    Michael Becar

    Executive Director

    International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards and Training

    Michael N Becar International Association of Directors of Law Enforcement Standards & Training (IADLEST) Mike has nearly 50 years in Law Enforcement, starting with the Caldwell, Idaho police department for 12 years reaching the rank of commander, then working with Idaho Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) for 27 years, the last 10 years as Executive Director. At Idaho POST he was responsible for the basic training of every law enforcement officer in Idaho as well as corrections, parole and probation, juvenile corrections, and law enforcement dispatchers. Mike was appointed Executive Director of IADLEST in January 2012, which serves as the national forum of Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) agencies, boards, and commissions as well as statewide law enforcement training academies throughout the United States. Mike holds a Bachelor of Science in Education, Trade and Technology from the University of Idaho. He is a member of Phi Kappa Phi, honor society of Boise State University, Graduate of the FBI National Academy, session 159 and the FBI Intermountain Command College.

    Harry Delgado

    Accreditation Program Director

    New Jersey State Association of Chiefs of Police

    Harry J Delgado, Ed.S. is the Accreditation Program Director of for the New Jersey State Association of Chiefs of Police. In this capacity Mr. Delgado directs, plans, organizes, and coordinates all accreditation programs, functions, and activities of the New Jersey State Association Chiefs of Police Law Enforcement Accreditation Program, the New Jersey Public Safety Communications Centers Accreditation Program, and the New Jersey Law Enforcement Accreditation Commission. In addition, provides leadership as a member of the AccredNet leadership team to ensure cooperation and communication amongst states with accreditation programs in alignment with the organization?s strategic objectives. Serves as a member of their Steering Committee and the By-Laws Committee. Mr. Delgado has a Master of Arts degree (MA) in Human Resource Management and an Education Specialist Degree (Ed.S) in Education Leadership Management policy, Administration and Supervision.

    Travis Parrish

    Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies

    As Director of Client Services & Relations for the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies, Inc., (CALEA?), Mr. Parrish?s primary responsibility is to ensure positive client engagement and Accreditation success. Working with eight Regional Program managers (RPMs), Mr. Parrish and the RPM team, educate agencies on the value of CALEA Accreditation, while also working with CALEA client agencies to achieve and maintain their CALEA Accredited status. Having provided strategic communications and public relations services within the public safety and defense industries for the past 20 years, Mr. Parrish also is responsible for developing and executing against a comprehensive marketing and communications plan. Travis is a long-standing member of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), where he serves as a member of the Community Policing Committee. He is a veteran of the United States Marine Corps and he supports a number of special charities such as the National MS Society Chapter of Central & Eastern Virginia.

    Vonda Matthews, LCPC

    DOJ/COPS Office